Harmful Effects of High Blood Glucose?

Chronically elevated blood glucose damages the body, particularly the heart, but I’m guessing that means what you’d find in an insulin-resistant person with diabetic levels of blood glucose for years, right?

And for hard-training, lean guys who are spiking blood glucose post-training with wholesome natural foods for the anabolic effects of insulin, and whose blood glucose insulin brings back to baseline after 2-3 hours, it’s nothing to worry about? I’m asking because I’m 5’9", 200lb/9-10%, and can tolerate large amounts of carbs without much fat gain - roughly 600g-800g on training days. I keep fat and fibre fairly low.

So no experts have shown up. My answer is there’s no need for someone with good insulin sensitivity to worry. Insulin will shuttle the glucose to the liver and muscles before accumulates in the blood enough and for long enough to do damage. And leanness is the best predictor of insulin sensitivity.

If this were something to worry about, there’d be tons of articles on it.

[quote]wsk wrote:
So no experts have shown up. My answer is there’s no need for someone with good insulin sensitivity to worry. Insulin will shuttle the glucose to the liver and muscles before accumulates in the blood enough and for long enough to do damage. And leanness is the best predictor of insulin sensitivity.

If this were something to worry about, there’d be tons of articles on it.[/quote]

Your answer looks pretty accurate, assuming you are healthy your blood sugar shouldn’t spike to pathological levels in such a short period.

http://www.T-Nation.com/readArticle.do?id=5103371

^ somewhat useful

Also the odds of you truly being glycogen depleted are pretty low, if youre working out relatively normal (ie 3-5 days a week 60-90 minutes) and eating a normal diet.

The guys who actually get glycogen depleted are like marathon runners or people who are doing excessive physical activity. Obviously diet will also play into this equation (ie carb cycling or something if you do several low carb days then your glycogen might end up depleted or ketogenic diets etc).

Obviously its not quite that simple, but odds are very likely that anyone taking in those massive amounts of carbohydrates is taking in more than just sufficient amounts for replenishing glycogen.

Insulin resistance isnt exactly completely figured out nor am I an expert, but id imagine as long as you have a solid overall diet along with regularly working out (which improves insulin sensitivity) combined with a healthy body weight/fat and somewhat regularly having fasting glucose checked you have nothing to worry about.

Of course there are genetic factors as well as other things beyond our current understanding as well, so who knows.

[quote]wsk wrote:
Chronically elevated blood glucose damages the body, particularly the heart, but I’m guessing that means what you’d find in an insulin-resistant person with diabetic levels of blood glucose for years, right?

And for hard-training, lean guys who are spiking blood glucose post-training with wholesome natural foods for the anabolic effects of insulin, and whose blood glucose insulin brings back to baseline after 2-3 hours, it’s nothing to worry about? I’m asking because I’m 5’9", 200lb/9-10%, and can tolerate large amounts of carbs without much fat gain - roughly 600g-800g on training days. I keep fat and fibre fairly low.[/quote]

It actually damages the vessels which then affect the heart. but no its not bad to spike blood sugar if your body deals with it well and returns to normal in a couple hours. the problem comes when blood sugar is always elevated because your body can’t handle it or because you keep shoveling in sugar all day. the healthy body easily deals with blood sugar spikes 2 or 3 times a day with no detrimental consequences.

OK, cheers. I checked out Lyle McDonald’s view on this as well. In case anyone’s interested:

Carb-loading individuals - up to 7g per lb LBM - so for me that’s 7x180 = 1260g
Non carb-loading individuals - up to 4g per lb LBM - 4x180 = 720g

I not carb-depleted on training days, so I’ll stick to the lower recommendation.