T Nation

Happy 4th British Brothers


#1

I am not being facetious. To Renton and all the other Brits. I am American, and today is our 4th.

Many ways to measure true brothers. One is when you can fight with them and still end up friends - that is the Brits with us Americans. Another is when they have your back even when you screw up. I felt the invasion of Iraq was a mistake from the beginning, but even then the Brits had our back.

I consider myself patriot and American, just got done celebrating the 4th - and during the fireworks had to feel grateful for my/our British brothers. My grandmother on my dad's side was fresh off the boat from England.

Happy 4th of July - Independance day


#2

p.s. we won


#3

Nah, we let you go. It was a sneaky plan to get rid of all the obnoxious fat people with bad dress sense and overload voices.

j.k. :wink:

Hope you all had a good 4th of July! It is local election day down here in Mexico so all bars are shut and the supermarkets can’t sell beer. Good job I stocked up on Friday!


#4

It is my suspicion that British people don’t think much of Americans, at least that has been my observation with my encounters with them.


#5

[quote]MaximusB wrote:
It is my suspicion that British people don’t think much of Americans, at least that has been my observation with my encounters with them. [/quote]

Yes, Blair definitely inadverdently sent a huge wave of anti-Americanism sweeping across the U.K. by backing Bush a few years ago. Sucks, but maybe the damage can be repaired…


#6

[quote]Cockney Blue wrote:
Nah, we let you go. It was a sneaky plan to get rid of all the obnoxious fat people with bad dress sense and overload voices.
[/quote]

Ouch, touche! I think, actually, that we wanted to escape the lack of dental care and bad weather. Hah, I’m j/k, too; that’s all I could think of for stereotypes :wink: Mexico, huh? Lucky bastard :slight_smile:

Here in Georgia beer can’t be sold on Sundays, but it can be bought in dining establishments/bars… assinine, I know; that’s our fucking silly ‘moral majority’ down here for ya. Luckily I stocked up on Shock Top yesterday… great beer!


#7

[quote]MaximusB wrote:
It is my suspicion that British people don’t think much of Americans, at least that has been my observation with my encounters with them. [/quote]

I’ve only met a few Americans, and although I did find them a little loud (I myself am rather quietly spoken), I’m happy to count them as friends.

Happy Independence Day.


#8

[quote]Roual wrote:
MaximusB wrote:
It is my suspicion that British people don’t think much of Americans, at least that has been my observation with my encounters with them.

I’ve only met a few Americans, and although I did find them a little loud (I myself am rather quietly spoken), I’m happy to count them as friends.

Happy Independence Day.[/quote]

Maybe they were Northerners?


#9

[quote]MaximusB wrote:
It is my suspicion that British people don’t think much of Americans, at least that has been my observation with my encounters with them. [/quote]

I have no problem with Yanks.

Maybe those people just didn’t like you!

j/k

LR


#10

[quote]MaximusB wrote:
It is my suspicion that British people don’t think much of Americans, at least that has been my observation with my encounters with them. [/quote]

It’s true that the general opinion in England of Americans is not a good one, but in my experience it’s based on meeting a very small proportion of your society (14 year old’s who’ve just learned how to swear over the internet etc.). However on every one of the numbers of trips I’ve made to America I’ve always felt that as a whole, Americans are unfairly labeled, in fact in some areas Britain could take some lessons (customer service is considered a chore and something to be barely attempted in England!). But people will believe what they want and jump to false conclusions. Although admittedly G.W.Bush did little to further your cause :wink:

As for the American civil war, my generation (early 90’s) seem to care very little about our history and culture as English people (unless they’re playing “who’s the better country” with other idiots on youtube, or trying to annoy the scottish boy in school), which is sad considering how much England has affected the world - albeit sometimes negatively - over the 1700 or so years since we were first documented. That’s the key difference (in my opinion) between American and English people, you tend to be passionate about your history and achievements, we don’t (on the whole) remember much that we are proud of! Our independence from the likes of the Romans came and went a long time ago, so things still fresh in American minds is taken for granted and wholly uncelebrated in England.

Maybe then it’s not that we think little of you, but simply that, as a people, we no longer understand your passion for things which we’ve not had to think about, let alone fight for, in over 1000 years and take your passion as bragging, instead of a celebration of your still relatively new nationality.

Or maybe it’s just that we seem to mainly meet the minority of idiots that you have and vice versa :stuck_out_tongue:

/essay

I hope you all have had (are having? don’t know the time differences :P) a good 4th of July! Best wishes from across the pond :wink:


#11

[quote]RedviperUK wrote:
MaximusB wrote:
It is my suspicion that British people don’t think much of Americans, at least that has been my observation with my encounters with them.

It’s true that the general opinion in England of Americans is not a good one, but in my experience it’s based on meeting a very small proportion of your society (14 year old’s who’ve just learned how to swear over the internet etc.). However on every one of the numbers of trips I’ve made to America I’ve always felt that as a whole, Americans are unfairly labeled, in fact in some areas Britain could take some lessons (customer service is considered a chore and something to be barely attempted in England!). But people will believe what they want and jump to false conclusions. Although admittedly G.W.Bush did little to further your cause :wink:

As for the American civil war, my generation (early 90’s) seem to care very little about our history and culture as English people (unless they’re playing “who’s the better country” with other idiots on youtube, or trying to annoy the scottish boy in school), which is sad considering how much England has affected the world - albeit sometimes negatively - over the 1700 or so years since we were first documented. That’s the key difference (in my opinion) between American and English people, you tend to be passionate about your history and achievements, we don’t (on the whole) remember much that we are proud of! Our independence from the likes of the Romans came and went a long time ago, so things still fresh in American minds is taken for granted and wholly uncelebrated in England.

Maybe then it’s not that we think little of you, but simply that, as a people, we no longer understand your passion for things which we’ve not had to think about, let alone fight for, in over 1000 years and take your passion as bragging, instead of a celebration of your still relatively new nationality.

Or maybe it’s just that we seem to mainly meet the minority of idiots that you have and vice versa :stuck_out_tongue:

/essay

I hope you all have had (are having? don’t know the time differences :P) a good 4th of July! Best wishes from across the pond :wink:

[/quote]

Damn, RedViper, that was a really insightful first post! Good reasoning and good points! It’s currently 6:50PM EST, BTW, so the fourth’s been over for a while. I believe that EST is GMT-5.


#12

[quote]RedviperUK wrote:
MaximusB wrote:
It is my suspicion that British people don’t think much of Americans, at least that has been my observation with my encounters with them.

It’s true that the general opinion in England of Americans is not a good one, but in my experience it’s based on meeting a very small proportion of your society (14 year old’s who’ve just learned how to swear over the internet etc.).

However on every one of the numbers of trips I’ve made to America I’ve always felt that as a whole, Americans are unfairly labeled, in fact in some areas Britain could take some lessons (customer service is considered a chore and something to be barely attempted in England!). But people will believe what they want and jump to false conclusions. Although admittedly G.W.Bush did little to further your cause :wink:

As for the American civil war, my generation (early 90’s) seem to care very little about our history and culture as English people (unless they’re playing “who’s the better country” with other idiots on youtube, or trying to annoy the scottish boy in school), which is sad considering how much England has affected the world - albeit sometimes negatively - over the 1700 or so years since we were first documented.

That’s the key difference (in my opinion) between American and English people, you tend to be passionate about your history and achievements, we don’t (on the whole) remember much that we are proud of! Our independence from the likes of the Romans came and went a long time ago, so things still fresh in American minds is taken for granted and wholly uncelebrated in England.

Maybe then it’s not that we think little of you, but simply that, as a people, we no longer understand your passion for things which we’ve not had to think about, let alone fight for, in over 1000 years and take your passion as bragging, instead of a celebration of your still relatively new nationality.

Or maybe it’s just that we seem to mainly meet the minority of idiots that you have and vice versa :stuck_out_tongue:

/essay

I hope you all have had (are having? don’t know the time differences :P) a good 4th of July! Best wishes from across the pond :wink:

[/quote]

Good comments generally, but I happen to remember that at one point Brits were fond of saying the sun never set on the Union Jack. Seems like a bit of pride to me!

In any event, I spent about 2 months in the UK in summer 2003 and came away with a deep appreciation for the country. If I couldn’t live in the US for some reason, the UK would undoubtedly be my next choice (with Australia a close second). Great people and beautiful country. Cheers!


#13

[quote]LiveFromThe781 wrote:
p.s. we won[/quote]

p.s. We got our asses kicked 19 years later by the British, you know, when they burned down the white house.

I couldn’t imagine why the British (and the rest of the world), hates us. Perhaps its the vast ignorance that being fat as fuck makes you better than the rest of the world. Or that because you live in America your somehow smarter then everyone else, even though American’s are typically idiots. But I suppose we still have freedom…or whats left of it.


#14

[quote]Tyrant wrote:
LiveFromThe781 wrote:
p.s. we won

p.s. We got our asses kicked 19 years later by the British, you know, when they burned down the white house.
[/quote]

Well, uh, we didn’t like that one anyway. We were going to tear it down the next month, but they just saved us labor costs.

So, uh, take that you limey cunts!

PS–God Save the Queen!


#15

Guy Fawkes was cool


#16

[quote]Therizza wrote:
Guy Fawkes was cool[/quote]

But we have that song from Team America.

Trump card.


#17

P.S. I’m an American…

AMERICA, FUCK YEA!


#18

Happy 4th! I think we learned a lot from the British on what not to do when trying to rule the world.


#19

[quote]adamhum wrote:
Happy 4th! I think we learned a lot from the British on what not to do when trying to rule the world. [/quote]

You sure about that, lol?


#20

Hey I may bust balls a bit on here but I love most of the places that I have visited in the US. I work for a US company and a lot of my work contacts are in the states.

When us Brits stereotype the US we sometimes forget what a huge and varied country the US is. Also, pretty much every annoying personality type that we rag on also exists in spades in the UK.

Yes Britain has given a lot of culture to the world over the couple of thousand years that we have been relevent but it would be ridiculous to ignore the huge amount of culture that the US has spread over the last couple of hundred.

I see the US - Great Britain relationship like that between a brash younger brother who takes risks and occasionally pisses people off by being a bit too loud and crass, and the more experienced older brother who sometimes thinks that because he is older he knows everything about everything.