T Nation

Hand Grippers


#1

I finally decided to work on my grip. Its probably one of my weakest links. I wanted something to use at home, outside of buying plates and piles of paper (an article I read). I've looked around on the site a bit and found the Captain of Crush grips. Though they looked great. However, I really didn't want to pay $20 for each one, since I'd probably need 3.

Doing a little research online, I found an Ivanko Super Gripper. It seems great because its so adjustable and reasonable priced. But I cannot find any feedback on this thing. What would you recommend I get?

Any advice on dip belts too? Anything to keep an eye out for when shopping for one? Or just buy a long chain and loop it through my belt loops?


#2

I love my Ivanko spring loaded hand gripper. I would say for the money it's by far better than the Captains of Crush grippers. But I own a set of the COC grippers too. I was a grip fanatic for a while in the late 90's.


#3

A little more searching would find a buyers rating for Heavy Grips. They are built much like the Captains of Crush, but sell for less. I think you can get on their website a buy a set of 5 (100 lbs - 300 lbs in 50 lbs. inc.) for $70. I believe the singles are something like $15.

I already own the first two CoC grippers, otherwise I'd buy the Heavy grips. If you're just starting out, buy one 100 lbs. one and by the time you're ready to move up, you can swing another 15-20 on the next.


#4

The Ivanko Supergripper is great, though the COC is a slightly different stimulus. And, if you're looking to get certified, you'll need to practice with them. Other than that, though, supergripper will do ya just fine.

If you want a cheap-o dip belt, loop a chain around your normal lifting belt. You'll rip your pantloops right off if you try the way you mentioned.

-Dan


#5

I've used the Ivanko, had no complaints about it. the adjustability factor is its biggest plus. COC are the original and I gues you could say the standard by whcih grip is emasuered.

an aside: Lets not start arguing about the differences in gripper strength bewtween companies and individual grippers. COC were the first big name, so thats why i'm saying they're the standard.

If you get an Ivanko for your crushing grip, you'll be good to go. Build a pnch grip block (take a chunk of 4X4, screw in an eyehook, hook a loading pin to it and there you go) for working that aspect as well as pinching plates and you'll be set.

Also recommend getting a sledgehammer for levering work. Sledgehammer levering works your whole hand like nothign else will. Also cool to walk into Lowes, pick up a 12 lb sledge and freak out the salesfolks by levering it.


#6

What do you mean by levering exactly? Picking it up by the end of the wooden handle and lowering and raising it?


#7

Levering: Pick up a sledge by the handle, (at the far end) and hold it with the handle parallel to the ground. then move your wrist so the handle moves from parallel to the ground to perpendicular to the ground.


#8

Basically yes.

Strictly done, hammer levering would involve holding the sledge by the end of the handle, out at arms length, shoulder level. Using just wrist motion you lower the hammer back down to where it touches your nose. Most guys that lift could do a 8 lb. A twelve takes some grip stength. My goal is a 16.

Hammer work really works the wrists and overall grip. You can adjust the weight by simply sliding your hand closer to the head. Easiest way to get used to the motion and to get an idea of what you can do with one while trainig is start our with a broom. Wrsit circles, roling it different directions, etc. it will develop the wrist and forearm tremendously.

The thing with levering is the weight is part of the whole torque equation. While an 8 pound hammer sounds small, when you factor in the length of handle you're putting a lot more weight on your wrist.

I believe the equation is 8 lb x 36 inches length on the handle = 288 lbs torque on your wrist.

If anyone wants to correct my math, please do.