T Nation

Hamstring/Quad Balance?

I’ve read most athletes are quad dominant and will find great value in hammering the posterior chain to bring up the balance and increase performance.

I’m aware of some of the problems that arise when the quads over power the posterior chain, but I’m wondering if it’s possible to bring up the posterior chain so much that the hams/glutes overpower the quads in a negative way? What kind of symptoms or problems could occur if this is a possible scenario?

LOL instead of walking leaning forward relying more on your quads as the hams and glute expire youd prob walk like you have something up your butt all the time.

What makes you feel this could be an issue I think it would be VERY hard to accheive but im sure its possible.

Phill

On that note: I wonder if the upper posterior could become overdeveloped relative to the upper anterior.

[quote]Phill wrote:
LOL instead of walking leaning forward relying more on your quads as the hams and glute expire youd prob walk like you have something up your butt all the time.

What makes you feel this could be an issue I think it would be VERY hard to accheive but im sure its possible.

Phill[/quote]

Actually I kind of walk that way a little now after bringing up my rear these past five months! Actually I was just curious as to what some of the problems would be if it got too strong?

You’d probably become some sort of olympic or world champion.

[quote]gasbolt wrote:
You’d probably become some sort of olympic or world champion.[/quote]

Yeah, tough side effect there. And you’d always have women checking out your ass. That would really suck.

Seriously though, the largest muscle in the body is the gluteus maximus, and the PCL (the knee ligament that your hamstrings pull against) is larger and twice as strong as the ACL (ligament the quads pull against). Our bodies are made for stronger posterior chains.

I’ve been wondering the same, since I squat 3x per week but in comparison I only deadlift 1x per week, with no other posterior chain work. Mind you the squat days have varying intensity/load, whereas the deadlifts are usually just a heavy 5x5 ramping.

I don’t remember who said this, but:

“If you can’t see in the mirror, train it.”

Most people train their anteriors because that’s what they see. Most people train the large muscles because they see them. It’s the posterior, and the small muscles, that are often ignored.

Right now I’m taking Waterbury’s advice and ignoring my chest; I’m working only my back, my glutes, my hamstrings, and my core (with lots of eternal rotator and leg ab/ad work). I look the same in the mirror, but my I’m adding plates to my squat and deadlift by the week. I know it will pay off in the future.