T Nation

Hamstring Advice Please

Quick history, Pulled left hamstring away from ischial tube when I was only 12, then I pulled it again when I first started lifting when I was 22 and recovered to 100% in 6-8 weeks, now 3 years later I pulled it again. I did a heavy deadlift day, then the next day kinda took off into a trot and felt it pull. i backed off leg work for 2 weeks and started doing recovery shit.

Stretching, foam rolling, fixing my anterior pelvic tilt, stretching hip flexors, glute activation and strengthening, ART at a physio, hamstring strengthening. after all that and 3 months time passed this shit won’t get better. If i kick my leg out, or try to run full speed, or stretch it to its old ROM, i get a sharp pain high in the hammy near the glute tie in.

I just want some direction on what to do next, can anyone help?

I got this too, from just a light jog 2 mins down the road, and all the stretching in the world on my hams didn’t make a jot of difference. However I’ve found my glutes were very tight, and stretching them made my hams feel much better. From there, I’ve found my hips are tight too, so now I’m working on that. Hope it helps, but I’d also be interested in seeing what other, more experienced/knowledgable people have to say on the matter, and how to improve it.

[quote]EllisUFC wrote:
Quick history, Pulled left hamstring away from ischial tube when I was only 12, then I pulled it again when I first started lifting when I was 22 and recovered to 100% in 6-8 weeks, now 3 years later I pulled it again. I did a heavy deadlift day, then the next day kinda took off into a trot and felt it pull. i backed off leg work for 2 weeks and started doing recovery shit.

Stretching, foam rolling, fixing my anterior pelvic tilt, stretching hip flexors, glute activation and strengthening, ART at a physio, hamstring strengthening. after all that and 3 months time passed this shit won’t get better. If i kick my leg out, or try to run full speed, or stretch it to its old ROM, i get a sharp pain high in the hammy near the glute tie in.

I just want some direction on what to do next, can anyone help? [/quote]

Yes, sldl’s should strengthen the area. Also, to me, it sounds like you have a crap ton of scar tissue in there. Through the ROM of the sldl’s, that should clear up.

If there is scar tissue in there that is restricting your flexibility, you should see a doc. They can try ultrasound or Graston Technique to try and break it up.

[quote]niksamaras wrote:

Yes, sldl’s should strengthen the area. Also, to me, it sounds like you have a crap ton of scar tissue in there. Through the ROM of the sldl’s, that should clear up.
[/quote]

I don’t doubt its scarred up, there is a half golf ball sized lump palpable when flexed at the high end of the hammy, and i can pinpoint on ropey section that is always hot. I’ll look around for graston and US possibilities.

Thank you all for responses.

One thing you should note is that after a hamstring tear there is a pretty marked neural inhibition of the muscle torn (which is probably biceps femoris since that is the most commonly torn hamstring muscle). Since this research has only just come out I doubt there is any good information on how to overcome this inhibition.

From personal experience of a quad tear, dry needling from a good practitioner seemed to be an effective technique to help overcome the inhibition. I definitely felt a lot better after the treatment, but I don’t think there would be any good research to back that up so take that for what its worth (an n = 1 experience). From there onward, eccentrically biased training (look up nordic hamstring curls) should probably be the top of your list of exercises to help prevent from future injury, just make sure your body has recovered enough to actually handle such training (a physio or chiro should be able to tell you).

As for scar tissue, all kinds of practitioners claim to be able to deal with it, but I really don’t know which are the most effective. Like a lot of people I have heard ART does wonders, but I can’t say from experience. Good luck.