T Nation

Half Reps Work Best


#1

A lot of people have had luck with less than the a full ROM in producing gains. Which movements does this rule apply most?


#2

Bottom half of bench press for chest, upper half of close grip bench for tris, upper half of pullups/pulldowns to keep stress on lats, etc


#3

Some make better gains by not locking out (applies to several exercises), thereby keeping the tension on the muscle and not letting it rest and/or not letting the weakest part of the ROM restrict weight used (overhead pressing for example) and some feel that going deep on squats hits their glutes more than anything else.


#4

Everybody's biomechanics are different, find what works best for you /thread


#5

I disagree with all of this. And I (we) would love to see a picture of your developement level.


#6

Mmm, it depends on what feels good and works for you honestly. People do great doing a full ROM, some people do great with half reps. Everybody has different angles and different ROMS that work well for them.

For me, half reps are great for going past failure for tricep pushdowns and bicep curls. If i can't do anymore i just bring them up as high as i can (usually a little under half way) then rep them out for the bicep curls. Tricep pushdowns i push them down as far as i can. As long as i can still feel it, it's all good no matter how limited of a ROM it is.


#7

everyone knows half rep pelvic thrusts are complete bullshit!


#8

Deadlifts. I call them "rack pulls".


#9

#10

thats what she said


#11

I don't see how that has anything to do with the discussion.


#12

He didn't lock out...for max gains...just saying


#13

[/quote]

what do you mean upper half? Not that I believe or not in this it is just that I train at home, my ceilling is low and the pullup is one on the only lat movement I can do.

I am pretty sure the lower part in a pull-up (or when you are at the bottom) which would be the upper part of a pulldown (when the bar is higher) puts more emphasis on the back. Yeah I feel more me lats in this part but I just wanna make sure if in theory it is supposed to do so.

If my ceilling is low and I can do the 1/3-1/4 upper rom of the pull-up is it that bad for the lats?

Why am I confused now


#14

what do you mean upper half? Not that I believe or not in this it is just that I train at home, my ceilling is low and the pullup is one on the only lat movement I can do.

I am pretty sure the lower part in a pull-up (or when you are at the bottom) which would be the upper part of a pulldown (when the bar is higher) puts more emphasis on the back. Yeah I feel more me lats in this part but I just wanna make sure if in theory it is supposed to do so.

If my ceilling is low and I can do the 1/3-1/4 upper rom of the pull-up is it that bad for the lats?

Why am I confused now[/quote]

I probably should have said 'top half'. Basically where the muscle is under more of a stretch. On pullups/pulldowns the bicep takes on more of the load when the bar comes closer to your chin (or maybe it's juts because of my long ass arms haha).

EDIT: Basically what I am saying is if when you train the lats you (whether on a pulldown or doing pullups) have the bar come no lower than about nose level. As an example, watch when Matt Kroc does his pullups, you'll see thats exactly what he does. Thats how most guys I know prefer them.

I hope that makes sense. I might not have explained it properly.
Semantics is a bitch.


#15

You have explained it correctly Northland but its completely wrong...

The first half of the pull down or pull up begins with scapular retraction and then simultaneous elblow flexion/adduction. Its not until the elbow reaches 90 degrees that you can predominantly adduct the arm, which is at the end of the rep when the elbow gets closer to the ribs. This would result in maximal lat activation, not the other way round.

This is why you promote pulling with the elbows and not the arms so that the beginning of the movement uses as little elbow flexion/bicep activation as possible.


#16

I pretty much use full range of motion most of the time. There are benefits to partial reps, I think the biggest being that you can use a lot more weight when you just work in your strongest part of the exercise to overload the muscle. I think it is just that though, an overload technique to be used sparingly like using body english in some lifts for the hardest few reps. Best exercises to use it are pretty much all the big compound lifts.