T Nation

Guys On T Who Don't Lift Heavy

I’m reading a lot of threads on this forum about Medical Research into hormonal patterns as we age and I’m also seeing a lot of posts from guys getting lab tests and asking for advice.

In regards to the medical studies, I’d like to know the characteristics of the control groups when they do these studies. I doubt that anyone in the control groups have spent any significant time in a gym let alone done compound lifts on a regular basis. Are there any formal hormonal studies that relate to the men who make up this forum? That is, men who spend at least 3 or more days a week lifting heavy weight?

I’ve never supplemented with T or GH and hopefully never have to, but if the time comes I’d like to have a good study to turn to as it relates to men who actually train and diet to increase their T levels. Hell, maybe I’m the only guy here that doesn’t shoot up T. That would be nice to know as well.

In regards to the guys getting lab tests, do you also train? If so, how hard and heavy? I’m a firm believer that heavy compound work and a good diet will help raise your T levels naturally. It takes time and its hard work, but the results are natural. I’m certain there are also situations where heavy training didn’t help boost T levels. Any insights on why that happens?

[quote]Bagger wrote:
I’m reading a lot of threads on this forum about Medical Research into hormonal patterns as we age and I’m also seeing a lot of posts from guys getting lab tests and asking for advice.

In regards to the medical studies, I’d like to know the characteristics of the control groups when they do these studies. I doubt that anyone in the control groups have spent any significant time in a gym let alone done compound lifts on a regular basis. Are there any formal hormonal studies that relate to the men who make up this forum? That is, men who spend at least 3 or more days a week lifting heavy weight?

I’ve never supplemented with T or GH and hopefully never have to, but if the time comes I’d like to have a good study to turn to as it relates to men who actually train and diet to increase their T levels? Hell, maybe I’m the only guy here that doesn’t shoot up T. That would be nice to know as well.

In regards to the guys getting lab tests, do you also train? If so, how hard and heavy? I’m a firm believer that heavy compound work and a good diet will help raise your T levels naturally. It takes time and its hard work, but the results are natural. I’m certain there are also situations where heavy training didn’t help boost T levels. Any insights on why that happens?

[/quote]

Not on T and hopefully never need to be.

I have found that Dr Healy’s Magnesium Lotion makes me have wicked dreams and I wake up with hard-ons like when I was 13 years old!

Ditto on T-shots and ditto on the magnesium. Wheat germ oil helps as well. Zinc too.

This may be a noob question but is heavy compound lifting, following a good diet, getting good rest, and taking OTC supplements when needed enough to raise T-levels to the point of countering the effects of Andropause? Has anyone tested for this? After 40 can you raise your T levels to the high end of normal through natural means?

As a guess, what percent of over 40 natural powerlifters or bodybuilders are on HRT NOT because they are looking to increase their performance in the sport, but to simply raise T-levels to the high range of normal?

That leads to another question.

Is the above an oxymoron? Can you be considered natural powerlifter or bodybuilder when you are on HRT?

Sorry for all of the questions. From an outsider standpoint, it seems that HRT should be considered after you’ve spent time countering the effects of Andropause using natural means.

I thought this was a good Waterbury article on the subject. http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_article//5_ways_to_boost_testosterone

You are not the only guy here who doesn’t shot up T.

There are guys in their 60’s and 70’s who have followed a good diet regimen and challenged their bodies with heavy lifting and who have maintained their T-levels into the 700’s thereby.

I think it’s definitely possible.

I read at least 1 thread on the site, I think by 4est, who managed to reverse a young man’s almost complete lack of testerone production purely through manipulating his diet and having him lift heavy.

I’m not sure that andropause isn’t simply a dietary and environmental phenomenon rather than an actual condition that all males must go through as they age.

I think that some possible evidence of that is the apparent increase in young men (35 or so) who are experiencing low testosterone and requiring hormonal replacement therapy. I don’t think our genotype has changed as a species to such a degree that this would have such a sudden onset, such as in the last century.

What has changed in the last century is our exposure levels to environmental toxins and the relatively fast switchover to a carbohydrate-based diet from a meat and fat-based one. It would be interesting to compare andropause-onset ages and rates over the last century of America/Canada/Australia/England with those of non western countries. I haven’t seen any data about that myself. I should start digging…

[quote]hel320 wrote:
You are not the only guy here who doesn’t shot up T. [/quote]

Ditto!

[quote]skidmark wrote:

What has changed in the last century is our exposure levels to environmental toxins and the relatively fast switchover to a carbohydrate-based diet from a meat and fat-based one. [/quote]

And the fact that our move to an information and automation based society has us sitting on our asses and pushing buttons rather than doing any real physical work might have something to do with it.

I really think you are on to something. Nice post.

Men have to step up and start acting the part. Society is trying to strip the human male of his birth right. Our right to dominate anything we can conquer.

The pussyfication of man. We are being crippled with creature comforts. The male has forgotten, nothing great is easy to accomplish. If being an Alpha Male was easy everyone would be one!

As a male one has the unique opportunity to experience and explore the powers of the “Y” chromosome. Anyone can be female. Fact everyone is female, unless they are blessed with the Big “Y”. Basically that’s “Y” it’s a man’s world. So be a man and enjoy it, and fight for it! It’s our birth right!

Lift Big Things!

[quote]skidmark wrote:
There are guys in their 60’s and 70’s who have followed a good diet regimen and challenged their bodies with heavy lifting and who have maintained their T-levels into the 700’s thereby.

I think it’s definitely possible.

I read at least 1 thread on the site, I think by 4est, who managed to reverse a young man’s almost complete lack of testerone production purely through manipulating his diet and having him lift heavy.

I’m not sure that andropause isn’t simply a dietary and environmental phenomenon rather than an actual condition that all males must go through as they age.

I think that some possible evidence of that is the apparent increase in young men (35 or so) who are experiencing low testosterone and requiring hormonal replacement therapy. I don’t think our genotype has changed as a species to such a degree that this would have such a sudden onset, such as in the last century.

What has changed in the last century is our exposure levels to environmental toxins and the relatively fast switchover to a carbohydrate-based diet from a meat and fat-based one. It would be interesting to compare andropause-onset ages and rates over the last century of America/Canada/Australia/England with those of non western countries. I haven’t seen any data about that myself. I should start digging…[/quote]

x2

[quote]streamline wrote:
Men have to step up and start acting the part. Society is trying to strip the human male of his birth right. Our right to dominate anything we can conquer.

The pussyfication of man. We are being crippled with creature comforts. The male has forgotten, nothing great is easy to accomplish. If being an Alpha Male was easy everyone would be one!

As a male one has the unique opportunity to experience and explore the powers of the “Y” chromosome. Anyone can be female. Fact everyone is female, unless they are blessed with the Big “Y”. Basically that’s “Y” it’s a man’s world. So be a man and enjoy it, and fight for it! It’s our birth right!

Lift Big Things![/quote]

x2

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=7530701744597358451

[quote]mancandy wrote:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=7530701744597358451[/quote]

The Eye Opener, one would think. Great link.

I’m 39 and I haven’t taken anything in 19 years. But I was stupid enough to quit all exercise for about 6 years, some to injury, but mostly relocation to a very different area. Anyway, during this period of time I had most of the symptoms of low T…fat(ter), miserable, and lazy. I got back into lifting about a year ago and I feel so much better it’s unbelievable.

I recently partially tore my pec. But from reading here I blame it mostly on not deloading for a year. I planned what I called “go through the motions light weeks”…but nearly everytime about 20 minutes in I felt to good to “waste” a workout. I was also doing a 3 on 1 off split and that was to much after the first couple of months…but I couldn’t accept that each muscle group once a week was enough. I think the idea of training each group once a week was great information I got here…not just from a physical perspective, but it made me chase numbers more intensely.

I would try exercising consistently with intensity before I got my hormones checked. I don’t think T-levels were ever a problem for me…I still got all my hair, I get carded about half the time I buy alcohol, and move pretty good weights in the gym…but I pretty much had all the symptoms when I was doing no exercise.