T Nation

Gut Bacteria & Weight Loss

Preaching to the choir here…interesting nonetheless.

Very interesting.

I read, and I don’t remember where, that our gut flora is originally determined by our mother’s flora. Through a vaginal birth, we’re exposed to our mom’s fecal matter which then populates our gut.

It would be interesting to see GI issues in vaginal births v Caesarian to see if this is true.

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:
I read, and I don’t remember where, that our gut flora is originally determined by our mother’s flora. Through a vaginal birth, we’re exposed to our mom’s fecal matter which then populates our gut.[/quote]

Fecal matter in your mama’s vagina? Don’t mamas poop via a different orifice?!

hahaha

[quote]infinite_shore wrote:

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:
I read, and I don’t remember where, that our gut flora is originally determined by our mother’s flora. Through a vaginal birth, we’re exposed to our mom’s fecal matter which then populates our gut.[/quote]

Fecal matter in your mama’s vagina? Don’t mamas poop via a different orifice?!

hahaha[/quote]

You know the majority of babies are born face down, right?

And that the baby moving through the vagina squeezes fecal matter out much like you might try and get the last bit of toothpaste from the tube?

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:

[quote]infinite_shore wrote:

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:
I read, and I don’t remember where, that our gut flora is originally determined by our mother’s flora. Through a vaginal birth, we’re exposed to our mom’s fecal matter which then populates our gut.[/quote]

Fecal matter in your mama’s vagina? Don’t mamas poop via a different orifice?!

hahaha[/quote]

You know the majority of babies are born face down, right?

And that the baby moving through the vagina squeezes fecal matter out much like you might try and get the last bit of toothpaste from the tube?
[/quote]

Either way, thinking about this stuff cracks me up.

[quote]infinite_shore wrote:

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:

[quote]infinite_shore wrote:

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:
I read, and I don’t remember where, that our gut flora is originally determined by our mother’s flora. Through a vaginal birth, we’re exposed to our mom’s fecal matter which then populates our gut.[/quote]

Fecal matter in your mama’s vagina? Don’t mamas poop via a different orifice?!

hahaha[/quote]

You know the majority of babies are born face down, right?

And that the baby moving through the vagina squeezes fecal matter out much like you might try and get the last bit of toothpaste from the tube?
[/quote]

Either way, thinking about this stuff cracks me up.[/quote]

Have you read the story of the girl who had a fecal transplant from her dad? They poured it down a tube in her throat…

but, but calories in, calories out…

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:

[quote]infinite_shore wrote:

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:

[quote]infinite_shore wrote:

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:
I read, and I don’t remember where, that our gut flora is originally determined by our mother’s flora. Through a vaginal birth, we’re exposed to our mom’s fecal matter which then populates our gut.[/quote]

Fecal matter in your mama’s vagina? Don’t mamas poop via a different orifice?!

hahaha[/quote]

You know the majority of babies are born face down, right?

And that the baby moving through the vagina squeezes fecal matter out much like you might try and get the last bit of toothpaste from the tube?
[/quote]

Either way, thinking about this stuff cracks me up.[/quote]

Have you read the story of the girl who had a fecal transplant from her dad? They poured it down a tube in her throat…
[/quote]

The idea we would need a transplant to do what nature does on its own seems completely preposterous.

The microbiota that make up our gut come to us from all over the place.

The people I could see having true problems with their gut (and immune system in general) are germaphobes that sterilize everything, afraid of getting their hands dirty and children that never go outside and interact with other children.

Could probiotic rich foods give the same type of benefits/weightloss? For the last couple of months I have been eating sauerkraut, kefir yogurt/cheese, kefir coconut milk, and kefir coconut water every day, at the same time I have upped my calories to about 4200 up from 2400-2600 in an effort to gain, problem is I have lost 3 lbs. I also cut out all cardio except for walking my dog for 30 min. a few time a week.

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
The idea we would need a transplant to do what nature does on its own seems completely preposterous.

The microbiota that make up our gut come to us from all over the place.

The people I could see having true problems with their gut (and immune system in general) are germaphobes that sterilize everything, afraid of getting their hands dirty and children that never go outside and interact with other children.[/quote]

Might be preposterous but it works.

Most gut microbiote are determined by the flora in the vagina. I’m sure most on here are aware of their immune signaling properties. Along with the colostrum, essential fats, and IgG from the the mother’s breast milk, that’s all you need to start the process of starting up the gut and kick-starting the immune system.

^^^

I love reading your posts.

The composition of GI flora changes as we age, though these shifts are particularly dramatic in the early stages of life.

The newborn GI tract is typically considered to by a sterile environment but, as mentioned, mode of delivery appears to paly a role in early colonization; bacteria from the mother’s GI and vaginal tracts are associated with natural childbirth, while skin and the surrounding environment are early colonizers of Caesarian births.

After childbirth, the next major shift occurs from the infant’s diet: children given breast milk are seen to have a different intestinal flora than those fed formula (chiefly Bifidobacterium) that is thought to result from the presence of human milk oligosaccharides in breast milk that, while not digested by the infant, are readily utilized by this genus for growth. Evolutionary considerations are given to this, as opinions on Bifidobacterium range from “largely harmless” to “possibly beneficial”, and it is postulated that these indigestible HMOs are an adaptation that allows for bifidos to colonize at the expense of other, more pathogenic, organisms (evidence suggests that breast-fed infants have greater protection against GI infection than formula-fed ones, which are seen to have a great diversity in early intestinal flora). There’s some interesting stuff out there regarding early colonization and immune function, if anyone’s interested.

Weaning results in the final shift towards a more adult-oriented habitation characterized by greater microbial diversity, particularly from the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes phyla which are known to readily digest complex polysaccharides that we cannot.

By the time we are adults, the number of bacteria cells on any individual outnumbers their own somatic cells by an order of magnitude (10^14 vs 10^13), and that the collective genome of these cohabitants, called the ‘metagenome’, boasts over 100 times as many unique genes as is contained in our DNA, many of which serve complementary purposes to our own physiology (e.g., vitamin biosynthesis, immunomodulatory functions, energy production). At this point, anywhere from 500 to 1,000 species may be present in the GI tract in such a way that each individual has their own unique bacterial “fingerprint”, though despite this about 50 or so are seen to be “core” species that are found in all humans.

There is so much bacteria in there performing so many different functions that some researchers call it the “microbe/forgotten organ”, as the aggregate bacterial cell count would form a wad with metabolic functions comparable in overall workload to that of the liver. In fact, every time we poop ~50% of that mass is sloughed off bacterial cells.

We also have a large assortment of viruses, archaea, eukaryotes, etc. in there, as well, though their functions aren’t well established at this time (to my knowledge… I only deal with bacteria).

Regarding obesity: while there is (was?) some speculation about GI micrbiotia driving weight gain by increased caloric absorption, there;s some new research that is beginning to elucidate their role in the inflammatory aspects of insulin resistance and even in effects on GI satiety signals (both of which are thought to occur via their metabolites).

anonym you should have your own website.

you know everything

[quote]rds63799 wrote:
anonym you should have your own website.

you know everything[/quote]

lol you give me wayyy too much credit, man, though I appreciate the endorsement.

TBH, that ^^^ has more to do with my formative education/research being in microbiology than the result of any sort of encyclopedic knowledge. What little information I know is esoteric shit no one ever cares to think about… except for the 1 in a million time they do, in which case I am able to appear much smarter than I really am. Internet forums are great for that sorta thing, I guess.

well mate I think you’re a top tier poster on here, and always enjoy reading your posts

[quote]rds63799 wrote:
well mate I think you’re a top tier poster on here, and always enjoy reading your posts[/quote]
This…I always learn something from your posts and love how you cut threw the BS.

[quote]jppage wrote:

[quote]rds63799 wrote:
well mate I think you’re a top tier poster on here, and always enjoy reading your posts[/quote]
This…I always learn something from your posts and love how you cut threw the BS.[/quote]

Much appreciated, man.