T Nation

Gum Chewing

So I’m sitting and chewing gum and then I started thinking.

Chewing, if I’m not mistaken, is a part of digestion. You are making what ever you are ingesting into smaller pieces by splitting it with your teeth. Doesn’t that make your body prepare to digest by raising acidity levels in your stomach?

So what’s your take on this? Are you actually fooling your body that you are eating while you are really not, and thus depriving it of certain thing associated with eating.

You’re going to die.

Epic first post.

I think maybe you need to stop thinking so much.

You just invented a new diet, hurry and make a book before Shugart does. I kid, I kid.

[quote]AngryVader wrote:
Epic first post.

I think maybe you need to stop thinking so much.[/quote]

agreed.

[quote]iamthewolf wrote:
AngryVader wrote:
Epic first post.

I think maybe you need to stop thinking so much.

agreed.[/quote]

x2

deep thoughts from the shallow end of the gene pool…

and just what the hell was in that gum?

[quote]josh86 wrote:
iamthewolf wrote:
AngryVader wrote:
Epic first post.

I think maybe you need to stop thinking so much.

agreed.

x2[/quote]

x3 - but…

I was once told by a friend who is a clinician that regularly chewing gum, especially on an empty stomach, can be a cause of stomach ulcers for the exact reason that the OP mentioned.

I have no medical evidence to back this up however.

Are you sure you weren’t chewing on peyote?

Stick it in your pooper.

Then you will have more important things to worry about.

haha, man you guys are mean today!

depending on what studies you read, chewing gum can increase appetite for the reasons originally mentioned, also stimulates blood flow to the temporomandibular region which is suggested to improve mental acuity on a short term basis.

I don’t believe most of the studies anymore.
they are nothing more than market driven “experiments” to promote sales.

[quote]Renton wrote:
josh86 wrote:
iamthewolf wrote:
AngryVader wrote:
Epic first post.

I think maybe you need to stop thinking so much.

agreed.

x2

x3 - but…

I was once told by a friend who is a clinician that regularly chewing gum, especially on an empty stomach, can be a cause of stomach ulcers for the exact reason that the OP mentioned.

I have no medical evidence to back this up however.[/quote]

Neither does your “friend”.

This is one of the reasons Mercola doesn’t like gum. Not so much because of the stomach acid, but because of the constant stimulation of the salivary system.

[quote]Woundedbyravens wrote:
So I’m sitting and chewing gum and then I started thinking.

Chewing, if I’m not mistaken, is a part of digestion. You are making what ever you are ingesting into smaller pieces by splitting it with your teeth. Doesn’t that make your body prepare to digest by raising acidity levels in your stomach?

[/quote]

On the contrary:
[i] Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2001 Dec;110(12):1117-9.Links
Effects of gum chewing on pharyngeal and esophageal pH.

Smoak BR, Koufman JA.
Center for Voice Disorders of Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157-1034, USA.

We investigated the effects of gum chewing on pharyngeal and esophageal pH levels in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) who were undergoing reflux testing. Forty consecutive, unselected, adult patients who were undergoing ambulatory double-probe (simultaneous pharyngeal and esophageal) pH monitoring for diagnosis of LPR were asked to chew 2 sticks of gum 4 times during their pH studies.

Twenty subjects chewed regular sugarless gum, and 20 subjects chewed a sugarless gum containing bicarbonate. The subjects recorded the beginning and end of each gum-chewing period. The mean pH values for the gum-chewing intervals and for comparable pre-gum-chewing intervals were analyzed statistically for both the pharyngeal and esophageal probe data.

The regular gum group and the bicarbonate gum group were analyzed separately. In addition, the gum-chewing pH data were compared to controls, ie, normal postcibal buffering effects. The data show that gum chewing consistently increases esophageal and pharyngeal pH, and that bicarbonate gum causes greater increases than regular gum.

For patients with LPR, gum chewing appears to be a useful adjunctive antireflux therapy.[/i]

Chewing gum increases gastric secretions but raises gastric pH (especially in kids), but not in Norwegian smokers. Honest.
Chewing gum after abdominal surgery also relieves gut paralysis.

Too much time on my hands…

[quote]DrSkeptix wrote:
Woundedbyravens wrote:
So I’m sitting and chewing gum and then I started thinking.

Chewing, if I’m not mistaken, is a part of digestion. You are making what ever you are ingesting into smaller pieces by splitting it with your teeth. Doesn’t that make your body prepare to digest by raising acidity levels in your stomach?

On the contrary:
[i] Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2001 Dec;110(12):1117-9.Links
Effects of gum chewing on pharyngeal and esophageal pH.

Smoak BR, Koufman JA.
Center for Voice Disorders of Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157-1034, USA.

We investigated the effects of gum chewing on pharyngeal and esophageal pH levels in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) who were undergoing reflux testing.

Forty consecutive, unselected, adult patients who were undergoing ambulatory double-probe (simultaneous pharyngeal and esophageal) pH monitoring for diagnosis of LPR were asked to chew 2 sticks of gum 4 times during their pH studies.

Twenty subjects chewed regular sugarless gum, and 20 subjects chewed a sugarless gum containing bicarbonate. The subjects recorded the beginning and end of each gum-chewing period.

The mean pH values for the gum-chewing intervals and for comparable pre-gum-chewing intervals were analyzed statistically for both the pharyngeal and esophageal probe data. The regular gum group and the bicarbonate gum group were analyzed separately.

In addition, the gum-chewing pH data were compared to controls, ie, normal postcibal buffering effects. The data show that gum chewing consistently increases esophageal and pharyngeal pH, and that bicarbonate gum causes greater increases than regular gum. For patients with LPR, gum chewing appears to be a useful adjunctive antireflux therapy.[/i]

Chewing gum increases gastric secretions but raises gastric pH (especially in kids), but not in Norwegian smokers. Honest.
Chewing gum after abdominal surgery also relieves gut paralysis.

Too much time on my hands…[/quote]

There goes that “ulcer theory”.

I guess that one doctor who stated as such to the poster in this thread enjoys fabrication.

All gastric and digestion issues aside, it really is a loathesome pastime. The sound and sight of endless mastication…blech.

[quote]ouroboro_s wrote:
All gastric and digestion issues aside, it really is a loathesome pastime. The sound and sight of endless mastication…blech.[/quote]

Xylitol has been proven to reduce the bacteria associated with decay in the mouth. You may not like it, but I do believe more people should be chewing sugar free gum as well as taking better care of their mouths.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
ouroboro_s wrote:
All gastric and digestion issues aside, it really is a loathesome pastime. The sound and sight of endless mastication…blech.

Xylitol has been proven to reduce the bacteria associated with decay in the mouth. You may not like it, but I do believe more people should be chewing sugar free gum as well as taking better care of their mouths.[/quote]

I have no doubt you are correct. That type of chewing ad nauseum is something that has existed across many cultures for many centuries for a variety of reasons.

Benefits aside, I find the sight and sound intolerable.

Damn, Ouro. And I thought if we lived near each other we could be great friends.

But…now I realize we couldn’t. I love gum. Love, love, love gum. It seems to draw off some of my excess energy. I have a hard time being still unless I’m reading, and life seems to demand a great deal of thoughtful stillness from me.

I feel less frenetic with gum. Having an outlet also prevents the energy converting into anxiety, which I’m prone to.

And then, too, I love the taste of…tastiness. I don’t allow myself very much sweet stuff and my diet is horrifically repetitive. Bubblemint gum is like the sunshine in my bland, Wheat Chex and chicken breast-inundated life.

You’re just a mean, anti-gum bully. And now you’ve crushed my spirit. THANKS.

[quote]EmilyQ wrote:
Damn, Ouro. And I thought if we lived near each other we could be great friends.

But…now I realize we couldn’t. I love gum. Love, love, love gum. It seems to draw off some of my excess energy. I have a hard time being still unless I’m reading, and life seems to demand a great deal of thoughtful stillness from me. I feel less frenetic with gum.

Having an outlet also prevents the energy converting into anxiety, which I’m prone to.

And then, too, I love the taste of…tastiness. I don’t allow myself very much sweet stuff and my diet is horrifically repetitive. Bubblemint gum is like the sunshine in my bland, Wheat Chex and chicken breast-inundated life.

You’re just a mean, anti-gum bully. And now you’ve crushed my spirit. THANKS.[/quote]

That, and who doesn’t like the doublemint twins.