T Nation

Grunting Study lol

i came across a study about grunting couldn’t access the entire article

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=maximum%20isometric%20dead%20lifting

I find grunting to be therapeutic and will continue to grunt during heavy lifts even after reading

I think it’s a little hard to do a study on grunting when most of the time the noise has an emotional backing. You can’t just grunt. When I grunt during a lift it’s after intense visualization and psyching myself up. I think the grunt is a byproduct of that. I never intentionally grunt, but it does happen, no sense in fighting it because some study says its dumb.

[quote]thefreshmanverve wrote:
i came across a study about grunting couldn’t access the entire article

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=maximum%20isometric%20dead%20lifting

I find grunting to be therapeutic and will continue to grunt during heavy lifts even after reading [/quote]

Seems to work pretty well for this guy.

CS

I like grunting when I wake up to get the juices flowing, or when taking a dump. I also like grunting big time at work so I can enhance my performace and get good bonuses. I grunt before and during sex as well so I can unleash the beast better. Sometimes as I walk down the street I just start grunting to show passerbys that I’m not to be fucked with. EXPLODE

[quote]daraz wrote:
I like grunting when I wake up to get the juices flowing, or when taking a dump. I also like grunting big time at work so I can enhance my performace and get good bonuses. I grunt before and during sex as well so I can unleash the beast better. Sometimes as I walk down the street I just start grunting to show passerbys that I’m not to be fucked with. EXPLODE[/quote]

i don’t know how they can study ‘grunting’ anymore than they can study ‘squatting’. i mean… studies claim to study ‘squatting’ but then it turns out that what they looked at wasn’t a squat at all (in the sense of a good form squat to depth). so when ‘studies claim’ such things as ‘squats hurt your knees’ turns out that the study doesn’t show that at all since what the study studied wasn’t squats!

does that kinda make sense?

i reckon different things can be going on with grunts…

some people obviously do grunt for attention. that is to say the grunting doesn’t (isn’t supposed to) help their performance at all. it is voluntary. when you roll your eyes at them sometimes these people stop and don’t seem to suffer loss of strength because of it.

yelling in kung fu can be about that at times, apparently. it is about scaring the opponent. yell to intimidate. it isn’t supposed to help you punch harder but it is supposed to scare the other guy.

so… sometimes grunting / yelling is voluntary and doesn’t help performance.

but… i reckon othertimes it can be involuntary / it can help performance.

yelling can be about amping yourself up (scaring yourself - getting the adrenalin going). i do this for oly lifting and i swear it adds kg’s to my total (i know because i lift best when i’m alone or with earphones so i don’t feel self-conscious about my yelling).

there is some stuff on the ki ya (however you spell that) for karate…

partly it is about breath control. exhaling forcefully against a belly full of air. like how squeezing your hands really hard around the bar can help you lift more weight exhaling more forcefully (making more of a noise) can help you lift more weight.

i think eventually… one should be able to control it. apparently that is the case for martial arts… but students are often told to make noise so they learn to do it right… then gain control of the voluntary aspect of whether noise comes out or not.

i’m really interested in this…

for tennis, too…

but i really do think most studies simply miss the mark by:

  • thinking ‘grunting’ is grunting (that people can either make sound or not and they can measure whether there is increase in performance or not rather than linking grunting with breathing / intraabdominal pressure / ones natural inclination.

I remember watching sports science a few years ago and how it had an episode on maximum output. It had more to do with martial arts but all the results were the same. They had them break and strike things without screaming then after they would have them do their normal way, which they all grunted and screamed.

Everyone’s results from the test were pretty much the same in increase. The test showed that with the scream and grunt that there was an increase in power and acceleration. The reason why is because when you scream and grunt your body natually releases adrenaline.

The only reason I could really see how it wouldn’t help during deadlift would be because it is hard to scream and pull some big ass weight. But doing it just before the big pull I would imagine it would help from anything I have read or seen.

I grunt to assert my authority as the Alpha Male in any group anywhere and as a mating call while at bars and clubs.

…And to keep myself from passing out during big lifts. The intraabdominal pressure just gets to be so much that I get the stars and tunnel vision and have to let some air out so I don’t collapse in a heap and have a bar crash down on my head or something stupid like that.

Isometric deadlift.

I don’t grunt to increase my lift. I grunt because it hurts so damn much.