T Nation

Groin Soreness While Squatting/at Random

I decided I wanted to do Strong Woman about 2 months ago. About a month ago I started getting this soreness around the inner thigh groin area that has been causing my squats, sprints, and hell even climbing stairs discomfort. There is no swelling, bruising, or discoloration.

I went with baby weights for about 2 weeks and it seemed fine, I went back to my normal squats and lifts, till out of nowhere I woke up sore again, I hadn’t done squats in 2 days. I warm up with the Ladder of Power, and 3 lite sets of 10 and 1 medium set. I don’t know if this is normal in a fairly new and ambitious lifter or not. I have asked a couple of fellow strong men how my form is and the verdict was great. Just curious for any words wisdom or experience that may help.

[quote]WidowReaver wrote:
I decided I wanted to do Strong Woman about 2 months ago. About a month ago I started getting this soreness around the inner thigh groin area that has been causing my squats, sprints, and hell even climbing stairs discomfort. There is no swelling, bruising, or discoloration.

I went with baby weights for about 2 weeks and it seemed fine, I went back to my normal squats and lifts, till out of nowhere I woke up sore again, I hadn’t done squats in 2 days. I warm up with the Ladder of Power, and 3 lite sets of 10 and 1 medium set. I don’t know if this is normal in a fairly new and ambitious lifter or not. I have asked a couple of fellow strong men how my form is and the verdict was great. Just curious for any words wisdom or experience that may help. [/quote]

The term “groin injury” is ambiguous at best. There are several muscles in the region such as the adductor brevis/longus/magnus, pectineus, gracilis.

You did not mention if the issue is on one side only. From experience, it would not surprise me at all if the pain is specific to one side OR more significant on one side. You will need to provide more information.

Furthermore, your warm up is most likely inadequate. I know it’s fashionable these days to hit the gym, do a light sets of the movement you plan on doing that session, then gradually ramp up. One of the authors who contributes to this site is a proponent of this approach. And while this may work for some, most trainees will benefit from a more conservative approach - especially those who have not perfected their technique and learned to read the messages their body is giving them. Because you are a self-professed newbie at this, it’s a safe bet you qualify to be in this latter group.

And I don’t doubt what the more experienced lifters at your gym are telling you in terms of your technique. But you need to keep in an interesting fact about the barbell lifts. I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again:

Even if the barbell is moving in a perfect line, it is no guarantee the body is working in ideal synchronicity.

As much as I respect Bret Contreras’ work, he posted a relevant article today in which he argued that uni-lateral lifts are unnecessary. I sincerely believe this statement is true for less than 10 percent of all lifters out there. So, if you take my word for it, you have more than a 90 percent chance that you can benefit from unilateral lifts to complement your main lifts.

By groin pain I mean inner thigh close to the joint, I would say adductor longus but only in the crease of the thigh. However it has been both sides that have bothered me, it started on the right, went away and then randomly came up on the left side one morning. I don’t have anything against unilateral lifts, I only mention the squats because that’s where the pain is most noticeable. The pain however popped up after waking up, I never had any pain or strain in the area for a warning sign while squatting. It seemed to come out of nowhere for no reason one morning.

gilmores groin???i had it and needed an op sound similar

[quote]WidowReaver wrote:
By groin pain I mean inner thigh close to the joint, I would say adductor longus but only in the crease of the thigh. However it has been both sides that have bothered me, it started on the right, went away and then randomly came up on the left side one morning. I don’t have anything against unilateral lifts, I only mention the squats because that’s where the pain is most noticeable. The pain however popped up after waking up, I never had any pain or strain in the area for a warning sign while squatting. It seemed to come out of nowhere for no reason one morning. [/quote]

First and foremost, you should cease any activity which can make the injury worse. This sounds incredibly obvious, but you’d be surprised at how many athletes and coaches think training through an injury is a badge of honor. Those are the fools that, sooner or later, make their situation worse and no doubt lurk in forums such as this - ashamed to admit that they’re wrong yet desperately want a solution to their problem.

If the above paragraph makes me look like a monster, it’s only because I hope that you and others who read it are wise enough to not fall into a very dangerous trap.

You will need an accurate in-person diagnosis (which, unfortunately, may be easier said than done).

The adductor magnus plays a role in hip extension (the concentric portion of the squat). And, obviously, all three of the adductors do just what their names state - they bring the femor in medial. This may be taking place in the squat as you subconsciously adduct for a biomechanical advantage.

There could also be an impingement which could explain why the pain drifts from one side to another.

These are all theories based on the information you provided. By no means should you infer this to be a diagnosis. And self-diagnosis is a horrendous idea.

After you get an accurate in-person diagnosis, I hope you take the following to heart. The common denominator that I have noticed regarding groin injuries involves the inability to properly stabilize the hip. This is often a culmination of underactive muscles such as the glute medius, lack of flexibilty in other muscles, and over active muscles such as the piriformis.

So, what does this tell us…? It tells us uni-lateral work, some type of stretching, and some form of release work such as smr and/or massage by a skilled therapist ALL have a place in the tool box. Exactly how and when you implement these tools will be specific to you.

Feel free to keep us updated. I’m rather curious how this case-study evolves.

I did some slow and deep stretching, entire body as well as leg, the pain eased up and disappeared over night. I feel right as rain, a fellow lifter said he had something similar beginning, extreme soreness, after his inner thighs got stronger it went away. Told me to listen to my body and ease up a bit so I dont pull anything.