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Grip for Military Press

With military press, where abouts should my grip be on the bar? shoulder width,slightly wider, alot wider? And what type of grip is suitable for military press? just hold the bar with a normal all round grip? or should i put my thumbs horizontally below the bar?

or i’ve also seen someone at my gym place his palms horizontally and place the bar right at the bottom of his palm and just hold the top with his finger tips if this makes any sense.

Range of motion in military press? should i be going as low as i can, eg. touch the chest area. or does this help encourage injuries? is lowering to chin/nose area enough?

Should i be locking out on military press? usually on my last rep or two i will have too lockout for 3-4 seconds to gather my senses. And should my elbows be inline with the bar, or should my elbows be in front of my body for most of the press?

A pinch grip deadlift question, what rep scheme should i be using? i’ve currently only been using 25 pounds and going to failure to 4 sets, going from about 7-8 reps to 4
or should i go for higher reps and readjust my grip when its about to slide right off the plate?

Thats all for now thanks.

The overhead press, thoroughly explained by some smart guy (or, a few smart guys):

[quote]Rollsroyce13 wrote:
With military press, where abouts should my grip be on the bar? shoulder width,slightly wider, alot wider? And what type of grip is suitable for military press? just hold the bar with a normal all round grip? or should i put my thumbs horizontally below the bar? [/quote]
Start with the “standard” full grip. Occasionally experiment with a thumbless “suicide” grip because some people prefer it for overhead work (though I’m not one of them).

I can’t quite picture it, but it sounds unnecessarily funky.

Shoot for as close to collarbone-level as possible at the bottom. Inflexibility and/or extreme hypertrophy would be the top two reasons this position is unattainable/uncomfortable.

Full lockout at the top. Any compromise of muscle tension is negligible, and is outweighed by the strength/joint health benefits.

A little of column A, a little of column B. :wink: If your grip width is correct and your forearms are kept perpendicular, the elbows should pretty much take care of themselves.

[quote]A pinch grip deadlift question, what rep scheme should i be using? i’ve currently only been using 25 pounds and going to failure to 4 sets, going from about 7-8 reps to 4
or should i go for higher reps and readjust my grip when its about to slide right off the plate?[/quote]
Andy Bolton’s deadlift-specifc grip training article (includes pinch grip deads):

You might want to pluck some tips from that article instead of what you’ve been doing.

Also, if your grip is slipping, rather than failing from fatigue, you might want to consider chalk or some grip spray. But if the plates are sliding due to grip fatigue, you’d be better off not readjusting your grip (it’d be like doing forced reps in a regular lift. Fairly advanced, and very draining on your recovery).

Thanks for the great reply, yeah i missed the grip workout progam for deads, didnt realise it was a 10 second hold and what not. just going to read that military press article now, thanks

Anothner random question, when doing dips, or chins etc. And you want to attach addidtionally weight, should i be using a weight belt then hanging weight from that, i can connect the two using a rope pull down attachment. Or would using a simple long belt cord thing (hard to explain/ which enables me to hang the weight around my neck and the weight sits on my chest inside of around the feet?

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]Rollsroyce13 wrote:
With military press, where abouts should my grip be on the bar? shoulder width,slightly wider, alot wider? And what type of grip is suitable for military press? just hold the bar with a normal all round grip? or should i put my thumbs horizontally below the bar? [/quote]
Start with the “standard” full grip. Occasionally experiment with a thumbless “suicide” grip because some people prefer it for overhead work (though I’m not one of them).
[/quote]

I’m only chucking in here as I’ve recently changed grip in the overhead press. I used to use a full grip on the bar, but after reading something by Jim Wendler about the thumbless “suicide” grip being easier on the shoulders, I tried it out and found it a lot more comfortable (mind you, I do stand 6’ 6" tall and have gorilla like arms).

I’d say try the full grip for a time, then try the thumbless and see which you prefer. The only thing with the thumbless grip is be aware that there is the possibility to drop the bar more easily. I’ve never had a bar fall with a thumbless grip, but then I do clean the bar into place first and catch it with the same grip I use for overhead pressing, so I’m not sure if lifting from a rack would require a little more positional testing.

As for the dipping / chin up thing, I wouldn’t recommend putting anything weighted around your neck when doing dips or chins. I can envisage the load becomming uneven if leaning forward when doing dips, and possibly causing neck problems if heavy loads are used.

[quote]Rollsroyce13 wrote:
Anothner random question, when doing dips, or chins etc. And you want to attach addidtionally weight, should i be using a weight belt then hanging weight from that, i can connect the two using a rope pull down attachment. Or would using a simple long belt cord thing (hard to explain/ which enables me to hang the weight around my neck and the weight sits on my chest inside of around the feet?[/quote]
Again, I can’t quite picture the weight belt/rope pulldown contraption you’re describing. If you can securely affix a plate to a belt, I guess go for it. Just make sure there’s zero chance of the weight dropping mid-set, because you’d be screwed.

They do make belts specifically for adding weight to, like this:
http://www.flexcart.com/members/elitefts/default.asp?m=PD&cid=299&pid=54
Most gyms have one lying around in a corner somewhere.

For dips, I’d only consider adding resistance around your traps/upper back (not neck) if you’re using a resistance band as described in this article:

Because, like Roual said, you’re increasing the risk of injury if you leave a weight freely hanging from your neck. With the band, however, you’re anchoring the resistance to the handles, so the force is directed down and in towards your center, not really perpendicular to the ground. Make sense?

The old “dumbbell between the legs” is another classic way of adding resistance to chins and dips. Once you get strong enough that your legs are unable to hold a heavy-enough dumbbell, you win. :slight_smile:

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

The old “dumbbell between the legs” is another classic way of adding resistance to chins and dips. Once you get strong enough that your legs are unable to hold a heavy-enough dumbbell, you win. :)[/quote]

Naa

Then you wrap a towel around the dumbell handle and hold it between your teeth. THEN you win

[quote]BONEZ217 wrote:

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:
The old “dumbbell between the legs” is another classic way of adding resistance to chins and dips. Once you get strong enough that your legs are unable to hold a heavy-enough dumbbell, you win. :)[/quote]

Naa

Then you wrap a towel around the dumbell handle and hold it between your teeth. THEN you win[/quote]
Dude, I thought I asked you to keep our training sessions quiet.

Y’all will notice that that’s Bonez on the left. I wear horizontal stripes to accentuate my shoulder width.

Thanks for all the help Chris and others, I think ill stick to the fixing the plate to the belt as my gym does not have any bands/chains.

Another random question.

Should i add in back hyper extensions as a warm up, just 3x5 or should i complete them at the end of my workout. Should i be keeping them weightless for the more distant future just to strengthen my lower back, or should i begin adding weight so it is actually a hard set of 5?

[quote]Rollsroyce13 wrote:
Should i add in back hyper extensions as a warm up, just 3x5 or should i complete them at the end of my workout. Should i be keeping them weightless for the more distant future just to strengthen my lower back, or should i begin adding weight so it is actually a hard set of 5?[/quote]
If you’re doing them as part of your general warm-up before your planned workout of the day, I’d keep them relatively-easy, increasing the weight only enough to keep them challenging.

If you’re using them as a primary exercise in your workouts, then try to progress on them like you would with any other exercise. I’d just be very careful about lifting to muscular failure on an exercise like that (as in, I wouldn’t do it).

Fun fact: Reg Park would often begin training sessions with 45-degree hypers in sets of 10, “ramping” the weight up over three or four sets.

As another alternative, if you’re doing them as a warm-up, you might want to consider holding them for time rather than reps. Hold the static “locked out” position for 15-30 seconds, keeping your body rigid the entire time. Once you get 1-3 sets of 30 seconds, you can hold a weight to your chest. This builds static strength through the low back and core, which can be important for overall back health and strength. I first read about it from Jim Wendler, and I believe Eric Cressey has mentioned something similar.

thanks for the responses, just anothner question, when people throw around the word ‘rows’ on the forums and in articles, what exactly type of rows are these? the ones when u sort of bend over and pull the bar from the knees to the pelvic region? or the dumbell rows where u lean over and bring it from the floor to your chest area?

[quote]Rollsroyce13 wrote:
thanks for the responses, just anothner question, when people throw around the word ‘rows’ on the forums and in articles, what exactly type of rows are these? the ones when u sort of bend over and pull the bar from the knees to the pelvic region? or the dumbell rows where u lean over and bring it from the floor to your chest area?[/quote]

Any sort of horizontal pull that starts from in front or slightly below the body.

[quote]Rollsroyce13 wrote:
thanks for the responses, just anothner question, when people throw around the word ‘rows’ on the forums and in articles, what exactly type of rows are these? the ones when u sort of bend over and pull the bar from the knees to the pelvic region? or the dumbell rows where u lean over and bring it from the floor to your chest area?[/quote]
Are you referring to any particular article or instance?

If they’re speaking generally, as in, “Presses, rows, and squats are primary movement patterns.” Then, like Trav said, it’s about the basic rowing movement.

If they’re referring to specific exercises, “do two sets of rows for every set of bench press.” Then I’d probably expect them to clarify (dumbbell row, barbell row, t-bar row, etc.) But it’s a safe bet that bent-over barbell and/or one-arm dumbbell rows are “most basic” types.

And just for reference, barbell rows aren’t always pulled “to the pelvic region.” Could be to the belly button, somewhere around the abs, to the chest. Plenty of variety to experiment with.

Ok then thanks that sounds good, thanks for the references etc

You need to make sure you are shrugging your traps at the top of the lift. Exhale at the top, inhale, and perform another rep. If you “bounce” the weight at the bottom (without knee flexion, of course), this is desirable.

Remember to bring your torso UNDER the bar after the bar passes the top of your head. This creates a straight line between the bar, your body and the ground, instead of a funky angle that messes up your leverage against the weight.

thanks for the pointers, ill try this notion of shrugging my traps at the top of the lift.

Anothner random question, sorry i’d rather do this then makes new threads

When chains are used like each end of the bar during squats and bench, what exactly if the point? if its only more weight why not add plates, or does it add some more pressure through both phases of the lift concentric and eccentric? I have another question but i cant think of it right now :confused:

If you think about it, it adds more weight in the conentric phase since more of the chain is lifted as the weight is lifted. Westside Barbell uses this in their training, but I haven’t done it myself.

Oh yeah that makes sense thanks.