T Nation

Great Dane Owners Unite!


I thought we should have a thread for the Danes. Post pics of your buddy, tell stories, share sorrow, tips, ect.
Zeus 1.5 yrs 165#

[quote]strangemeadow wrote:
I thought we should have a thread for the Danes. Post pics of your buddy, tell stories, share sorrow, tips, ect. [/quote]
Achilles 2.5 yrs 150#

Don’t bigger dogs have problems with their stomach’s getting tangled up if they run about too much after a meal? How do you keep this from happening? I wouldn’t mind having a great Dane. Sweet looking dog!

[quote]FrozenNinja wrote:
Don’t bigger dogs have problems with their stomach’s getting tangled up if they run about too much after a meal? How do you keep this from happening? I wouldn’t mind having a great Dane. Sweet looking dog![/quote]
Big dogs can get what they call “bloat”. The stomach gets twisted and the dog could die. There are two solutions, the old school version where they literally tie the dogs stomach to the ribcage (very 50’s thinking) or just do what most people do: Don’t feed your dog before you take it out for exercise. Feed them when you get back, then they lay down and chill, problem solved.
My guys are super sweet, but most Danes are…

no exercise/excess water +/- 60 mins from eating.

Feeding raw will also go a long way in preventing this, as kibble can be quickly consumed and if allowed to drink lots of water at meals can cause issues too.

they are also very prone to heart issues which I was not aware of till recently. Another reason ours gets 15g fish oil, 1g Curcumin and 100mg Ubiquinol/CoQ10 daily.

don’t mind his weird foot bump lol

this is Ruger 150#s of muscle


another

miss her everyday

one last for now

beautiful dogs y’all have

[quote]strangemeadow wrote:

[quote]FrozenNinja wrote:
Don’t bigger dogs have problems with their stomach’s getting tangled up if they run about too much after a meal? How do you keep this from happening? I wouldn’t mind having a great Dane. Sweet looking dog![/quote]
Big dogs can get what they call “bloat”. The stomach gets twisted and the dog could die. There are two solutions, the old school version where they literally tie the dogs stomach to the ribcage (very 50’s thinking) or just do what most people do: Don’t feed your dog before you take it out for exercise. Feed them when you get back, then they lay down and chill, problem solved.
My guys are super sweet, but most Danes are…
[/quote]

its not really 50’s thinking. If you stitch their stomachs to the ribs (comparative in surgery to spay / neuter) it gives you 12+ hours to get your dog medicle attention for bloat, vs 2 hours otherwise. My gf works with the vet at the human society and they typically do this for all big dogs. You can also avoid it by feeding them more small portions of food then a few large portions.

back on topic. Love great danes, grew up with a 120 pound harliquen great dane… she was my WWF wrestling buddy… also, one of the few dogs who sits on a counch with all feet on the floor.

[quote]Ratchet wrote:

[quote]strangemeadow wrote:

[quote]FrozenNinja wrote:
Don’t bigger dogs have problems with their stomach’s getting tangled up if they run about too much after a meal? How do you keep this from happening? I wouldn’t mind having a great Dane. Sweet looking dog![/quote]
Big dogs can get what they call “bloat”. The stomach gets twisted and the dog could die. There are two solutions, the old school version where they literally tie the dogs stomach to the ribcage (very 50’s thinking) or just do what most people do: Don’t feed your dog before you take it out for exercise. Feed them when you get back, then they lay down and chill, problem solved.
My guys are super sweet, but most Danes are…
[/quote]

its not really 50’s thinking. If you stitch their stomachs to the ribs (comparative in surgery to spay / neuter) it gives you 12+ hours to get your dog medicle attention for bloat, vs 2 hours otherwise. My gf works with the vet at the human society and they typically do this for all big dogs. You can also avoid it by feeding them more small portions of food then a few large portions.

back on topic. Love great danes, grew up with a 120 pound harliquen great dane… she was my WWF wrestling buddy… also, one of the few dogs who sits on a counch with all feet on the floor.[/quote]
Well, I said 50’s because I think for an educated owner the procedure is unwarranted. I know humane society and shelter vets do this, but I was under the impression it’s because those owners are less “in the know” about specifics for special breeds. I’ve had big dogs for 25 years and never had an issue with any of my dogs. But I don’t let them eat before I take them out. I don’t even let them play rough after eating, but the are rarely inclined to.
Now let’s see a pic of that harlequin beauty!

This is my Sebastion, decent height for a Dane (36" at the shoulder) but very lean and athletic at only 130lbs. I take him on 2-5 mile runs on my bicycle ever day, sometimes twice a day. he is 5 years old, which is pretty old for a Dane, but he still has not lost a step.

[photo]16579[/photo]

Good looking!

[quote]strangemeadow wrote:
Well, I said 50’s because I think for an educated owner the procedure is unwarranted. [/quote]

I disagree and take offense at this. We lost Atlas to bloat at age 7 and we were very careful about the food he ate, when he ate, activity before and after eating.

Here’s the scenario. One sunny day Atlas and I went to the park and played. An hour or so later he got fed and had a great appetite. An hour or so after that my wife and I went out to dinner. When we came home a few hours later we found him and rushed him to the vet but it was too late to really do anything. He had a very fragile digestive system and was prone to diarrhea when he got nervous (which was often). He was a rescue so we were unsure of what his past had been.

Could we have done anything different? I guess so but to think it cannot happen to your dog is a foolish way of thinking and we will certainly tack our next Dane’s tummy.

james

Another gratuitous shot.

Interesting. I know this is a Great Dane Thread…but I also really want a Cane Corso…it is also a fairly big breed…is stomach stitching the same for all big breeds or are some breeds more prone to the bloat etc?

[quote]FrozenNinja wrote:
Interesting. I know this is a Great Dane Thread…but I also really want a Cane Corso…it is also a fairly big breed…is stomach stitching the same for all big breeds or are some breeds more prone to the bloat etc?[/quote]

more common in the deep chested dogs, that said I wouldn’t consider cane corsos deep chested… not sure though

From what I understand it’s typically deep chested dogs that are the most prone to it. We’ve got a Saint Bernard now and didn’t tack his stomach both because he’s not really that deep chested and because we got him when he was out of puppy stage.

There’s always a risk with surgery with big dogs so it’s probably one of those operations that should be done when they are younger. But I don’t know enough about the procedure to offer any real advice besides the thought that I would definitely do it. You lose one animal to that and you don’t ever want to risk it again.

james

though I hear it happens, but much more rare… feed raw, there’s much less chance of bloat… i can’t speak to the accuracy of this, but makes sense.

My girlfriend got an 8 month old great dane a few weeks ok. That thing is insanely quick and agile. Pretty cool animal.