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Gout Diet?

i had my first Gout attack on sunday it was not a very bad 1 but i need to do something if i don’t what to get it again :frowning: for what i have found out on the internet there are alot of no no in Gout diet and thie say u shuldt not be on a hige proten diet and thet is wery bad for me hehe sins i am trying to put on some kgs: so is ther any 1 out ther thet can help me ?

Came to the wrong place. Fitness message board are not the place to ask for MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY to manage disease.

[quote]BrickHead wrote:
Came to the wrong place. Fitness message board are not the place to ask for MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY to manage disease. [/quote]

Were you diagnosed with gout by a doctor?

You might want to ask about anti-inflammatory diets for gout therapy.

What you can do without your doc’s permission is to reduce all your sugar and seed oil intake. These are the two biggest culprits to dietary related inflammation.

If your doctor tries to give you meds but does not address your diet get a new doctor.

(As to not getting medical advice here I would ignore that suggestion because your doctors don’t really know what they are doing if it does not involve getting you addicted to their drugs.)

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:

(As to not getting medical advice here I would ignore that suggestion because your doctors don’t really know what they are doing if it does not involve getting you addicted to their drugs.)[/quote]

When it comes to gout, I’d trust a doctor over a random message board. Heck even something as seemingly harmless as nuts can be very problematic.

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:

(As to not getting medical advice here I would ignore that suggestion because your doctors don’t really know what they are doing if it does not involve getting you addicted to their drugs.)[/quote]

When it comes to gout, I’d trust a doctor over a random message board. Heck even something as seemingly harmless as nuts can be very problematic.[/quote]

Maybe, but acting on random advice is much different than asking for advice. I get loads of information from these boards but I am free to do my own research.

Besides, many doctors will tell their patients to avoid certain foods but forget all about the really damaging stuff like sugar and polyunsaturated fats.

For example, it may not really be the nuts in the diet but how the body is reacting to nuts along with other pro-inflammatory foods. Purine metabolism can be made very troublesome by consuming sugar and highly oxidative polyunsaturated fats. When this happens excess purine converts to uric acid and that is what causes gout.

Reducing sugar and seed oils is free advice that none should have to ask their doctors about.

I had high uric acid blood test(sorry about spelling). My Doc said: lay off red meat and beer(too thick blood anyway), add vitamin C, eat lots of beans and drink a lot of water…

So, do these things until you can see a doctor.

Do doctors even know what causes gout besides the generic medical answer that purine is not being properly metabolized?

This is my biggest beef with modern medicine: to treat gout doctors will prescribe medicine to lower uric acid and tell us not to eat purine rich foods but not do anything to treat the actual metabolic disorder because they could not prescribe us drugs with that treatment.

came across this today. Pardon the copy/paste, but doubt I can link to it

By Dr. Mercola

Painful, stiff and inflamed joints are a few of the characteristic symptoms of gout, which is a type of arthritis that is typically, but not always, located on your great toe.

When an attack occurs, the pain can be debilitating, with sufferers often describing it as being burned by a flame or skewered with a hot poker.

Gout symptoms usually go away within three to 10 days, and the next attack may not occur for months, or even years, if at all. However, oftentimes gout becomes a lifelong problem, with attacks occurring with increasing frequency and severity. In time, this can permanently damage your joints and surrounding areas.

Needless to say, preventing gout attacks is essential to maintaining your quality of life ? which is why new research showing cherries might do the trick is worth shouting from the rooftops.

10-12 Cherries a Day Can Reduce Gout Attack Risk

In a study of over 600 people with gout, those who ate a ½-cup serving of cherries a day, the equivalent of about 10 or 12 cherries, or consumed cherry extract, had a 35 percent lower risk of a subsequent gout attack.1 Those who ate more cherries, up to three servings in two days, had an even lower, 50 percent reduction in risk. 

It might seem strange that cherries would lower your risk of gout, as this condition is often associated with sugar, fructose and fruit juice consumption. But you only need to eat a small amount of cherries to get the benefit, meaning the sugar contribution is small. Plus, they contain powerful compounds like anthocyanins and bioflavonoids, which are known to fight inflammation. They may also be beneficial because of their impact on your uric acid levels.

Gout occurs when the metabolic processes that control the amount of uric acid in your blood fail to do their job effectively. The stiffness and swelling are a result of excess uric-acid-forming crystals in your joints, and the pain associated with this condition disease is caused by your body?s inflammatory response to the crystals. Past studies have found:

    Eating two servings of cherries after an overnight fast lead to a 15 percent reduction in uric acid, and lower nitric oxide and C-reactive protein levels (which are associated with inflammatory diseases like gout.)2 The researchers noted the study supports ?the reputed anti-gout efficacy of cherries? as well as ?evidence that compounds in cherries may inhibit inflammatory pathways.?
    Consuming tart cherry juice daily for four weeks may lower your levels of uric acid3

Fructose and Uric Acid: If You Have Gout, You Need to Know The Connection

Drinking just one soda or 6-ounce glass of orange juice a day has been linked to a significant increase in gout ? 74 percent and 41 percent, respectively ? compared to drinking these only rarely.4 We believe the primary culprit is fructose, which typically generates uric acid within minutes of ingestion. You probably already know that fructose is a sugar, but you may not realize is that it?s distinctly different from other sugars as it?s metabolized through very specific pathways that differ from those of glucose, for example, and through its distinct metabolic action, uric acid is generated.

For those of you who maintain that "a sugar is a sugar is a sugar," fructose -- and fructose ALONE -- drives up uric acid. And elevated uric acid levels are not only a factor in gout, they?re a factor in many other health conditions, including hypertension, insulin resistance/diabetes, obesity and kidney disease. Not coincidentally, may of these conditions, like diabetes and hypertension, also increase your risk of gout (as does the use of thiazide diuretics, which are commonly used to treat hypertension).

The connection between fructose consumption and increased uric acid is so reliable that a uric acid level taken from your blood can actually be used as a marker for fructose toxicity. I now recommend that a uric acid level be a routine part of your blood screening. According to the latest research, the safest range for uric acid is between 3 and 5.5 milligrams per deciliter, and there appears to be a steady relationship between uric acid levels and blood pressure and cardiovascular risk, even down to the range of 3 to 4 mg/dl. As you probably know, two-thirds of the U.S. population is overweight, and most of these people likely have uric acid levels in excess of 5.5. Some may even be closer to 10 or higher (this may explain why being overweight also increases your risk of gout).  Dr. Richard Johnson, professor of medicine at the University of Colorado, suggests that the ideal uric acid level is probably around:

    4 mg/dl for men
    3.5 mg/dl for women

You can find out more about how uric acid in your blood can cause not only gout but also wreak havoc on your blood pressure, insulin production and even kidney function in the interview with Dr. Johnson below.

What are the Top Tips for Preventing and Managing Gout?

Be careful not to overdo it on cherries. I know from personal experience because they are my favorite fruit and I could easily eat a pound of them in one sitting. They key is moderation, as large amounts of fructose on a regular basis are not a good strategy for health. Fortunately, they have a relatively short harvest season and are not a temptation for too long.

According to Dr. Johnson's research, a quarter of the U.S. population consumes a whopping 134 grams of fructose a day. This is a staggering amount of fructose when you consider the fact that you need to restrict your fructose intake to below 25 grams a day in order to maintain good health.

If you have gout, this is extremely important, and you must take into account the fructose you consume from fruit. For instance, if you eat cherries for their therapeutic value, 10 sweet cherries or 1 cup of sour cherries contain about 4 grams of fructose. The fructose level of other fruits are listed in the graphic below.

So if you had no other sources of fructose 25 cherries would put you at 10 grams of fructose. You would need to eat more than 60 cherries to put you over the limit. My guess is that if you only did this occasionally and did not have insulin resistance this would likely not be a problem. However, you would activate your fat switch and put on some storage fat. But that is ok as you have the metabolism designed to burn it, especially if you are not consuming cherries every day.

Limiting fructose in your diet is one of the most important parts of managing and preventing gout attacks, and you can find a simple guide for doing so using my nutrition plan. You?ll want to be sure to cut out soda, fruit drinks and other sweetened beverages, as these types of drinks are a primary source of excessive fructose. Instead, drink plenty of pure water, as the fluids will help to remove uric acid from your body.

Alcohol in general, and beer specifically, may also raise the levels of uric acid in your blood, so this should also be limited or avoided.

Actually many of my clients who have gout have done really well supplementing with the amino acid glycine. I learned this trick from Dr. Mark Schauss - simply take 1g (literally a 5th of a teaspoon) of glycine mixed in water each day. If you don’t see an improvement in 7 days, you can titrate up by 1g/day up to 20g/day if need be. Great for your liver health too.

Overall, very effective and cheap solution here.

[quote]Jackie_Jacked wrote:
Were you diagnosed with gout by a doctor?[/quote]

yes i went to the hospital and this is not the first time i get this but this is first time i get it after turning my life around

thx for that info jehovasfitness and i will def try that whit the cherries i have all so taken out all SUPPLEMENTS for now while i find out more about this hehe still have bit of pain but this was not as bad as last time

i will look in to thet hungryone

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
don’t really know what they are doing if it does not involve getting you addicted to their drugs.[/quote]

Oh yes, we all know ethical doctors intend to harm their patients, not really to treat or manage people’s diseases. And yes, he should ask for advice for medical nutrition therapy because we all know anyone with access to T-mag and Pub Med is just as qualified as a doctor or dietitian or pharmacist to practice.

Oh my evil doctor who treats my medical condition for the past 11 years. That evil doctor who who removed my mother’s pituitary tumor that was impinging on her optic nerves and wreaking havoc on her endocrne system. That evil doctor who untwisted part of my great grandmothers intestine. That evil doctor who performed hip resurfacing surgery on my uncle’s childhood friend and 25-year NPC veteran.

All the evil doctors saving lives everyday, performing amputations of necrotic and gangrene infected legs, tripling the lifespans of the needy in far off parts of the world, healing broken bones and life threatening wounds, prescribing the appropriate medicines for god knows how many illnesses… yup, you guessed, they don’t know what they’re doing.

The quintessential fitness internut–believing he knows more or is just as qualified as those who earned their bones with years of schooling and decades of demonstrated COMPETENCE in their respective fields.

What do you have to offer that a doctor, pharmacist, or dietitian doesn’t–or a bodybuilder for that matter, considering that, if I recall correctly, you’re the guy who said we shouldn’t listen to a SUCCESSFUL BODYBUILDERS’ ADVICE ON BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL BODYBUILDERS?

What line of work are you in?

[quote]BrickHead wrote:

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
don’t really know what they are doing if it does not involve getting you addicted to their drugs.[/quote]

Oh yes, we all know ethical doctors intend to harm their patients, not really to treat or manage people’s diseases. And yes, he should ask for advice for medical nutrition therapy because we all know anyone with access to T-mag and Pub Med is just as qualified as a doctor or dietitian or pharmacist to practice.

Oh my evil doctor who treats my medical condition for the past 11 years. That evil doctor who who removed my mother’s pituitary tumor that was impinging on her optic nerves and wreaking havoc on her endocrne system. That evil doctor who untwisted part of my great grandmothers intestine. That evil doctor who performed hip resurfacing surgery on my uncle’s childhood friend and 25-year NPC veteran.

All the evil doctors saving lives everyday, performing amputations of necrotic and gangrene infected legs, tripling the lifespans of the needy in far off parts of the world, healing broken bones and life threatening wounds, prescribing the appropriate medicines for god knows how many illnesses… yup, you guessed, they don’t know what they’re doing.

The quintessential fitness internut–believing he knows more or is just as qualified as those who earned their bones with years of schooling and decades of demonstrated COMPETENCE in their respective fields.

What do you have to offer that a doctor, pharmacist, or dietitian doesn’t–or a bodybuilder for that matter, considering that, if I recall correctly, you’re the guy who said we shouldn’t listen to a SUCCESSFUL BODYBUILDERS’ ADVICE ON BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL BODYBUILDERS?

What line of work are you in?

[/quote]

Quoted for truth

[quote]Consul wrote:

[quote]BrickHead wrote:

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
don’t really know what they are doing if it does not involve getting you addicted to their drugs.[/quote]

Oh yes, we all know ethical doctors intend to harm their patients, not really to treat or manage people’s diseases. And yes, he should ask for advice for medical nutrition therapy because we all know anyone with access to T-mag and Pub Med is just as qualified as a doctor or dietitian or pharmacist to practice.

Oh my evil doctor who treats my medical condition for the past 11 years. That evil doctor who who removed my mother’s pituitary tumor that was impinging on her optic nerves and wreaking havoc on her endocrne system. That evil doctor who untwisted part of my great grandmothers intestine. That evil doctor who performed hip resurfacing surgery on my uncle’s childhood friend and 25-year NPC veteran.

All the evil doctors saving lives everyday, performing amputations of necrotic and gangrene infected legs, tripling the lifespans of the needy in far off parts of the world, healing broken bones and life threatening wounds, prescribing the appropriate medicines for god knows how many illnesses… yup, you guessed, they don’t know what they’re doing.

The quintessential fitness internut–believing he knows more or is just as qualified as those who earned their bones with years of schooling and decades of demonstrated COMPETENCE in their respective fields.

What do you have to offer that a doctor, pharmacist, or dietitian doesn’t–or a bodybuilder for that matter, considering that, if I recall correctly, you’re the guy who said we shouldn’t listen to a SUCCESSFUL BODYBUILDERS’ ADVICE ON BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL BODYBUILDERS?

What line of work are you in?

[/quote]

Quoted for truth
[/quote]

Thanks!

I really don’t prefer to fly off the handle, but some statements and actions are just fucking rude and crass! And I see and hear it more everyday: unqualified and uninformed people putting down professions everyday. It’s especially pervasive on internet message boards. There are four areas in which fitness message board internuts feel they can take a stab–dietetics, medicine, pharmacology, and psychology (which usually has a crass, New Age flavor to it when internuts are trying to apply it to fitness)–without any credentials at all or even knowing fully what these fields entail or what the respective professionals learned and practice.

[quote]BrickHead wrote:
Thanks!

I really don’t prefer to fly off the handle, but some statements and actions are just fucking rude and crass! And I see and hear it more everyday: unqualified and uninformed people putting down professions everyday. It’s especially pervasive on internet message boards. There are four areas in which fitness message board internuts feel they can take a stab–dietetics, medicine, pharmacology, and psychology (which usually has a crass, New Age flavor to it when internuts are trying to apply it to fitness)–without any credentials at all or even knowing fully what these fields entail or what the respective professionals learned and practice.[/quote]

I totally agree with you. It’s classic Dunning-Kruger effect: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning–Kruger_effect

Exactly!

I have no problem with bodybuildign nutrition by anyone. People practice it on themselves and people like Shelby, Meadows, and Stu know more than 99.9% of dietitians and doctors for getting ripped.

[quote]dingox wrote:

[quote]Jackie_Jacked wrote:
Were you diagnosed with gout by a doctor?[/quote]

yes i went to the hospital and this is not the first time i get this but this is first time i get it after turning my life around [/quote]

What course of treatment did he prescribe for you?

[quote]BrickHead wrote:

Oh my evil doctor who treats my medical condition for the past 11 years. That evil doctor who who removed my mother’s pituitary tumor that was impinging on her optic nerves and wreaking havoc on her endocrne system.
[/quote]

Sorry OP for the brief hijack on my part.

Hi BrickHead. I thought your entire post was excellent but this part stood out to me in a big way. Did they remove the pituitary gland and how is your mother doing now? My father had the same surgery. Thank goodness for skilled professional surgeons and endocrinologists.