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Good to Enhance Insulin Sensitivity?


#1

To enhance your insulin sensitivity is good? ...... Right

The wording gets me sometimes.


#2

Yes.

If you’re insulin sensitive, then you don’t need to produce as much to have the same effect, because you are “sensitive” to its effects, I guess. Insulin resistant is the opposite, in that you need to produce more to get the desired effect. The idea is the less insuling your body needs to produce to function the better.


#3

It’s good to a point. If you’re too insulin sensitive, then you can wind up being insulin resistant because you’re producing a large amount of insulin for a small stimulus.

Think about a refrigerator or a household thermostat, you don’t want it to be too sensitive or it will cycle on for every small change in temperature, but if it’s not sensitive enough then you’ll have wide swings before it comes on.

This is why we need to move beyond thinking about insulin sensitivity and think about glucose disposal. Insulin is secreted in response to glucose after all, not the other way around.

In reality, a lot of the hypoglycemic agents we try to use to enhance insulin sensitivity are actually increasing glucose disposal; with less glucose around, you don’t secrete as much insulin.

Similarly, with a low-carb diet you’re not [only?] increasing insulin sensitivity per se, you’re just not putting a bunch of exogenous glucose into the blood so there’s less need to get rid of it and thus less insulin.


#4

Its more got to do with keeping fat dowm… After training is a good time for an insulin spike(transport nutrients). However other times not so.

So if one is more insulin sensitive than another, does that mean that the person who is more insulin sensitive can get away with a greater insulin spike during an evening meal for example.

Or… This may be easier to answer.
Is someone who is insulin sensitive going to find getting and staying ripped easier than someone who isn’t as insulin sensitive.


#5

[quote]conorh wrote:
It’s good to a point. If you’re too insulin sensitive, then you can wind up being insulin resistant because you’re producing a large amount of insulin for a small stimulus.[/quote]

What? No. Insulin sensitivity is not a measure of how much insulin your body produces in response to glucose in the blood per se, but rather a measure of how responsive your liver, muscles are fat are to the insulin that’s produced.

If they’re not sensitive, it means your body has to produce more insulin to get the nutrients stored than if they are sensitive. I don’t think there’s any such thing as “too sensitive,” only too insensitive, which is one of the ways you develop type 2 diabetes.

[quote]In reality, a lot of the hypoglycemic agents we try to use to enhance insulin sensitivity are actually increasing glucose disposal; with less glucose around, you don’t secrete as much insulin.

Similarly, with a low-carb diet you’re not [only?] increasing insulin sensitivity per se, you’re just not putting a bunch of exogenous glucose into the blood so there’s less need to get rid of it and thus less insulin.[/quote]

Fom what I understand, carbs actually increase insulin sensitivity, but low carbs, as you suggest, just decrease the need for insuling in the first place.


#6

[quote]paul496 wrote:
Or… This may be easier to answer.
Is someone who is insulin sensitive going to find getting and staying ripped easier than someone who isn’t as insulin sensitive.
[/quote]

I think that being ripped is the cause, not the effect of being insulin sensitivite. Berardi’s 7 habits for example, all have the effect of minimizing the bodies insulin response, whether by having smaller meals for less glucose to dispose of.

And by slowing digestion with vegetables for less glucose concentration, and only eating carbs in the morning or after a workout when your body is more natually insulin sensitive, and not mixing carbs and fat which also leads to less insulin. Exposure to insulin reduces insulin sensitivity, so that seems like the best approach.


#7

I got it, i just wanted to have the terminology down.

My carbs are eaten in the morning and post workout. Im doing good.

Cheers :slight_smile:


#8

If you eat good take cinnamon, fish oil, and the like to become more insulin sensitive, then you eat high GI food and over processed food for a day would you produce a lot more insulin than before?


#9

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#10

now that we have the terminology down.has anyone tried fenuplex and insulinomics from Poliquin’s site? the biosignature information is interesting and i am trying to learn more about it, mostly from the thread on the authors forum since there are no experts in my area.

trying to see if anyone has tried it, and also what supplements(and dosing) people have had success with to control insulin( and lose fat) in addition to low carb dieting of course. fish oil, r-ala,fenugreek,cinnamon? i just want to get feedback as to what people are taking and the dosage they are taking,hopefully i can find a cost effective stack to help with this problem.