T Nation

Good Rep/Set Scheme?

Would using 5x5 reps/set for one exercise per main muscle group and 4x6 for the other exercises be a good way to maximize strength and hypertrophy?
Day 1:
Squat
Glute-Ham Raises or Straight LegDeadlift
Bench Press
Inverted Rows
Pullups
Dips
Core Work
Calve Work
Foararm Work
Day 2:
Deadlift
Bulgarian Split Squat
Dumbbell Decline Bench
Military Press
Chinups
Upright Rows
Core Work
Calve Work
Foararm Work

i.e for day one:
Squat 5x5
Bench Press 5x5
Pull-ups 5x5
SLDL 4x6
Inverted rows 4x6
dips 4x6

The 5x5 and 4x6 training schemes have been staples for decades. Either works equally well. Mix and match to your preference.

Switch off periodically - meaning that if you are doing 5x5 for a body part change to 4x6 when you go stale. And vice-versa. Should keep you going for quite a while.

I also rest about a minute or less between sets. Is this good or should I rest longer? I try to keep short rest periods so I can get my workout done in less than an hour.

Ditto on the 5x5 method. Since I’m getting back into lifting I’ve been searching for new ideas and methods. Plus, being 33 and a former White Castle customer, hence the name, I need some extra help.

Here’s one that will get you to bleed and cry:

This method is often called the “ten sets method” but coach Poliquin calls it German Volume Training. Train 3 days in the week on a M, Tue, F split. Use a weight you could lift for 20 reps to failure or 50-60% of your 1RM. The rest periods are short, which is good for people trying to lean up while saving muscle. You rest 60 seconds when lifting in sequence and 90 seconds when lifting as a superset.

You do a 10x10 at 60% 1RM of incline DB press. Rest 90 sec., then do 10x10 of pronated pull-ups and rest 90. Then you do 3x10-12 of DB flyes, rest 60, 3x10-12 of DB rows. Done. It hurts but the results are worth it.

Poliquin recommends that you move on to a more intensive program for a three-week period once you’ve used this method for six workouts per body part.

Give it a shot and keep us up to date.

[quote]WhiteCastle wrote:
Ditto on the 5x5 method. Since I’m getting back into lifting I’ve been searching for new ideas and methods. Plus, being 33 and a former White Castle customer, hence the name, I need some extra help.

Here’s one that will get you to bleed and cry:

This method is often called the “ten sets method” but coach Poliquin calls it German Volume Training. Train 3 days in the week on a M, Tue, F split. Use a weight you could lift for 20 reps to failure or 50-60% of your 1RM. The rest periods are short, which is good for people trying to lean up while saving muscle. You rest 60 seconds when lifting in sequence and 90 seconds when lifting as a superset.

You do a 10x10 at 60% 1RM of incline DB press. Rest 90 sec., then do 10x10 of pronated pull-ups and rest 90. Then you do 3x10-12 of DB flyes, rest 60, 3x10-12 of DB rows. Done. It hurts but the results are worth it.

Poliquin recommends that you move on to a more intensive program for a three-week period once you’ve used this method for six workouts per body part.

Give it a shot and keep us up to date.

[/quote]

I always liked this article:
http://www.T-Nation.com/findArticle.do?article=05-091-training

Personally I love 5x5. Although I think 4x6 is very similar, and the body won’t see it as being that different, so if you get stale, I would suggest moving further away from 5 reps. 8x3 or 3x8 would work well for you primary movements. I would keep the reps for the secondary movements in the 6-10 range (3-4 sets).

I’ve tried the 10x10, and while many people seem to like it, I simply got better at doing 10x10, and not much else.

I think the shorter the rest periods are with the 5x5, the less effective the program becomes. I wouldn’t go any less than 2 minutes between sets. Then if you want to save time, you can cut back to 60 seconds on your secondary movements or superset them.

I love 5x5 because I get to stay closer to my 1RM than with higher rep sets. But I suppose it depends on your goals.

On a similar topic, what do people think of mixing low rep and higher rep lifts. For example 5x5 for some lifts and 3x10 for others?

[quote]Plim wrote:
I love 5x5 because I get to stay closer to my 1RM than with higher rep sets. But I suppose it depends on your goals.

On a similar topic, what do people think of mixing low rep and higher rep lifts. For example 5x5 for some lifts and 3x10 for others? [/quote]

When I’m doing 5x5, I’ll only do it for one big movement each day (squat, dl, bench, row, etc). Then the rest of the accessory work is done for sets of 8, 10 or 12 usually 2-3 sets of each. I think 5x5 for every lift in a given day is too taxing and too time consuming. I’ve had good results so far.

[quote]Modi wrote:
Plim wrote:
I love 5x5 because I get to stay closer to my 1RM than with higher rep sets. But I suppose it depends on your goals.

On a similar topic, what do people think of mixing low rep and higher rep lifts. For example 5x5 for some lifts and 3x10 for others?

When I’m doing 5x5, I’ll only do it for one big movement each day (squat, dl, bench, row, etc). Then the rest of the accessory work is done for sets of 8, 10 or 12 usually 2-3 sets of each. I think 5x5 for every lift in a given day is too taxing and too time consuming. I’ve had good results so far.[/quote]

Cool thanks for that. I was considering putting in higher reps for isolation/accessory work, I often use 2x5 for such things but it dosen’t seem like enough work in a set sometimes with the smaller movements when only doing 5 reps.

Sorry to the OP if that was a little bit of a highjack, but I assume it had some relevance.

[quote]Plim wrote:
Modi wrote:
Plim wrote:
I love 5x5 because I get to stay closer to my 1RM than with higher rep sets. But I suppose it depends on your goals.

On a similar topic, what do people think of mixing low rep and higher rep lifts. For example 5x5 for some lifts and 3x10 for others?

When I’m doing 5x5, I’ll only do it for one big movement each day (squat, dl, bench, row, etc). Then the rest of the accessory work is done for sets of 8, 10 or 12 usually 2-3 sets of each. I think 5x5 for every lift in a given day is too taxing and too time consuming. I’ve had good results so far.

Cool thanks for that. I was considering putting in higher reps for isolation/accessory work, I often use 2x5 for such things but it dosen’t seem like enough work in a set sometimes with the smaller movements when only doing 5 reps.

Sorry to the OP if that was a little bit of a highjack, but I assume it had some relevance.

[/quote]

To continue the hijack a little longer…I like the Set Rep Bible article as well. I think there are some pretty good guidelines in there, and I try to keep my accessory work within the 24-50 reps per muscle group range.

That’s why I would agree that 2x5 would be on the low side, if that were the only movement you were using for that specific muscle. 2x12 would work, 3x8, etc.

You can take a tip from Dan John’s OLAD.

Start out with 7x5 (35 reps total) for week1, reduce to 6x3 (18 reps total) for week2, then a 5rm, a 3rm, and a 2rm for week3. Take the 4th week off and use the time to improve flexibility, use the foam roller etc.