T Nation

Good Operator Prep Workout?


#1

Anyone know of a good operator/military prep workout program? Looking to improve strength and endurance for my PFT for OCS. Have a favorite one? What were your results?
All help is appreciated


#2

A good place to start:

Also run a search on" predator conditioning’, “SF workouts”., Martin Rooney and Dan John programs.You will have to increase your conditioning,( weighted rucks, sprints, medium level running, etc). No disrespect, but concentrate on the level of requirements to succeed( running, pull ups, push ups, rope climbs, bodyweight exercises, etc) dont get caught up in this crap about “I dont want to lose any muscle mass” Jesus, you are there to learn how to command troops in combat, worry about your squat numbers after you get your bars.


The Tactical Life
#3

[quote]idaho wrote:
A good place to start:

Also run a search on" predator conditioning’, “SF workouts”., Martin Rooney and Dan John programs.You will have to increase your conditioning,( weighted rucks, sprints, medium level running, etc). No disrespect, but concentrate on the level of requirements to succeed( running, pull ups, push ups, rope climbs, bodyweight exercises, etc) dont get caught up in this crap about “I dont want to lose any muscle mass” Jesus, you are there to learn how to command troops in combat, worry about your squat numbers after you get your bars.

[/quote]

Don’t worry losing muscle mass or “looking perfectly symmetrical” is last on my mind. Just trying to get strength and endurance up.


#4

Great stuff from Idaho. This is something I’ve been doing a bit of background work on, and I’ve been reading a few things, and talking to a few people, and the consensus I’ve come across more and more is that the candidates that are successful do tend to have surprisingly high levels of strength. You should certainly listen to Idaho ahead of me, this is his bread and butter, but there does seem to be a degree of correlation between those who get through, and a pretty respectable level of basic strength.

For example, Alex Viada, who coaches a lot of SF guys, and prospective guys, believes that successful candidates in his experience tend to be squatting somewhere north of 355lbs (or says so in his new book Hybred Athlete), because that represents a high degree of tendon, core, leg etc strength, required to endure long loaded marches and the general demands of selection. Obviously 355lbs sounds like a pretty arbitrary number, but it probably is useful as a yardstick for saying that as well as being highly conditioned, you also need to be physically objectively strong compared to most people (who aren’t competitive strength athletes).


#5

I really can’t argue with Idaho about strength and endurance, generally. His advice is as good or better than anyones regarding this subject. I will say this: What ever distance you run each week, your body can only handle about a 20% increase from week to week, with a very obvious point of plateau when your reach a certain mileage.

Increases beyond this 20% each week will lead to typical overuse injuries including ligament injuries, stress fractures, unbearable shin splints and the worst of the lot - ACL injuries. OCS is hardly special warfare, but you’re going to be running often. You’re going to be running fast. And you’re going to be running far. The number one reason for Dropouts in schools like OCS, Aircrew, BUDS etc is overuse injuries. Obviously more so in the Specwar schools.

Be sure you have a solid, incremental and challenging running program. Increase mileage intelligently and rehab as much as you can.

If you’re preparing for basic or OCS, I would focus on those core PFT events and be sure that your first and last PFTs are ‘excellent’ or better. That’s not because those numbers are the best way to get fighting fit, but because those are essential PFTs that could speed up your next promotion or help determine your preferred permanent duty station. Once you’re at your permanent duty station, you can start training for the requirements of your MOS/rating/whatever using MUCH more advanced methods than just doing the PFT exercises.

Just out of curiosity, which branch is this OCS for?


#6

You are going to OCS not selection. Do not use the term ‘operator’ in OCS.

You failed to mention what branch of service
Every branch has a packet listing the requirements for OCS PFT.

As a potential future officer you will lead the way. I never worked with an officer who scored less than his troops. Focus on what the requirements are for your branch of service.

In short; Run, push-ups, sit-ups, swim, and pull ups depending on the requirements

One of the best free training programs I have seen is the Navy Seal PT Guide. It is well structured and can be adjusted according to your OCS/Branch needs. I know guys who remove swim sprints and replace them with Ruck Marches or a rest. Throw in Pulls-ups every other day, and so on. Adjust it for you. Yes, it includes strength training.

I train with 60 year old Vets who do it. Take a look at it and you will understand.

Edit: sealswcc.com/PDF/naval-special-warfare-physical-training-guide.pdf

Good Luck


#7

I think I can echo what Reconbyfire is saying here. You’ll need to focus on your PRT events because that’s what you get graded on. You can absolutely blow at 8 count body builders or star jumps or whatever and enjoy a good chewing out for that when you’re finally in OCS but, where the rubber meets the road, the physical standard is the PRT.

The discussion about whether they are the true test of a military athlete, or if they actually prepare you for combat can be had when you graduate. The more complex and useful ‘operator’, style workouts can be done after as well.


#8

I’ll just leave this here.


#9

[quote]LondonBoxer123 wrote:
Great stuff from Idaho. This is something I’ve been doing a bit of background work on, and I’ve been reading a few things, and talking to a few people, and the consensus I’ve come across more and more is that the candidates that are successful do tend to have surprisingly high levels of strength. You should certainly listen to Idaho ahead of me, this is his bread and butter, but there does seem to be a degree of correlation between those who get through, and a pretty respectable level of basic strength.

For example, Alex Viada, who coaches a lot of SF guys, and prospective guys, believes that successful candidates in his experience tend to be squatting somewhere north of 355lbs (or says so in his new book Hybred Athlete), because that represents a high degree of tendon, core, leg etc strength, required to endure long loaded marches and the general demands of selection. Obviously 355lbs sounds like a pretty arbitrary number, but it probably is useful as a yardstick for saying that as well as being highly conditioned, you also need to be physically objectively strong compared to most people (who aren’t competitive strength athletes). [/quote]

i’m not discounting the advantage strength provides, but i have to point out how many guys in SpecOps are using various PEDs…

steroids are very commonly used once a guy makes it through selection. not everybody, but a lot of guys do.

one of the better PT programs i’ve seen was the military athlete program…


#10

[quote]cycobushmaster wrote:

[quote]LondonBoxer123 wrote:
Great stuff from Idaho. This is something I’ve been doing a bit of background work on, and I’ve been reading a few things, and talking to a few people, and the consensus I’ve come across more and more is that the candidates that are successful do tend to have surprisingly high levels of strength. You should certainly listen to Idaho ahead of me, this is his bread and butter, but there does seem to be a degree of correlation between those who get through, and a pretty respectable level of basic strength.

For example, Alex Viada, who coaches a lot of SF guys, and prospective guys, believes that successful candidates in his experience tend to be squatting somewhere north of 355lbs (or says so in his new book Hybred Athlete), because that represents a high degree of tendon, core, leg etc strength, required to endure long loaded marches and the general demands of selection. Obviously 355lbs sounds like a pretty arbitrary number, but it probably is useful as a yardstick for saying that as well as being highly conditioned, you also need to be physically objectively strong compared to most people (who aren’t competitive strength athletes). [/quote]

i’m not discounting the advantage strength provides, but i have to point out how many guys in SpecOps are using various PEDs…

steroids are very commonly used once a guy makes it through selection. not everybody, but a lot of guys do.

one of the better PT programs i’ve seen was the military athlete program…

[/quote]

Do you know this to be true directly? I would have thought it was a significant disadvantage to be on steroids and suddenly find yourself in the middle of a cycle operating in the back of beyond, with no access to your juice.

I’m genuinely interested to hear more about this. I know almost nothing about steroids, have no problem with them in principle, and would just be curious to know what makes you say that many of them are using.

Anecdotally, all the guys I know who passed selection were all objectively strong blokes - not necessarily in the internet powerlifting sense, but in the sense of being ‘above average’ in levels of strength.


#11

[quote]LondonBoxer123 wrote:

[quote]cycobushmaster wrote:

[quote]LondonBoxer123 wrote:
Great stuff from Idaho. This is something I’ve been doing a bit of background work on, and I’ve been reading a few things, and talking to a few people, and the consensus I’ve come across more and more is that the candidates that are successful do tend to have surprisingly high levels of strength. You should certainly listen to Idaho ahead of me, this is his bread and butter, but there does seem to be a degree of correlation between those who get through, and a pretty respectable level of basic strength.

For example, Alex Viada, who coaches a lot of SF guys, and prospective guys, believes that successful candidates in his experience tend to be squatting somewhere north of 355lbs (or says so in his new book Hybred Athlete), because that represents a high degree of tendon, core, leg etc strength, required to endure long loaded marches and the general demands of selection. Obviously 355lbs sounds like a pretty arbitrary number, but it probably is useful as a yardstick for saying that as well as being highly conditioned, you also need to be physically objectively strong compared to most people (who aren’t competitive strength athletes). [/quote]

i’m not discounting the advantage strength provides, but i have to point out how many guys in SpecOps are using various PEDs…

steroids are very commonly used once a guy makes it through selection. not everybody, but a lot of guys do.

one of the better PT programs i’ve seen was the military athlete program…

[/quote]

Do you know this to be true directly? I would have thought it was a significant disadvantage to be on steroids and suddenly find yourself in the middle of a cycle operating in the back of beyond, with no access to your juice.

I’m genuinely interested to hear more about this. I know almost nothing about steroids, have no problem with them in principle, and would just be curious to know what makes you say that many of them are using.

Anecdotally, all the guys I know who passed selection were all objectively strong blokes - not necessarily in the internet powerlifting sense, but in the sense of being ‘above average’ in levels of strength. [/quote]

steroid use is pretty common in the military, in general. the SpecOps guys are operating at such a high tempo, and many are in their 30’s, to boot.

EQ and moderate dose testosterone is very common among that crew… not so much that they blow up, but enough that they’re stronger, have more endurance and most importantly: RECOVERY. going without sleep or very little sleep and having to do all that stuff is damn near impossible as one ages…

side note: i’m curious if the military ever did bloodwork on guys finishing up Ranger school, BUDs, Selection, etc… prolly pretty scary to see how suppressed everything would be…

EDIT: i just found this… pretty interesting: http://www.academia.edu/4112946/Physiological_Consequences_of_U.S._Army_Ranger_Training


#12

One: I’m using a Military Athlete (New name, ‘Strong Swift Durable’ or SSD) program right now, that has steadily improved my performance with a very progressive, 5/3/1 methodology by assessing a baseline, and building up to and beyond those max PR’s with inverted pyramid sets.

I can recommend Military Athlete, but be aware that in many cases you have to pay for their programs. There are some available for free online and if you have a military/DoD etc email you can get some wicked programs for free.

Two: Don’t be tempted to take PEDs until you’re well into your new command. I don’t care how many USMC Bulk Fuel Specialists tell you they take PEDs and get away with it.


#13

^excellent point.

to be clear, i wasn’t inferring that one needs to use steroids to make it through selection… what i was saying that it’s hard to truly assess some “SpecOps workout” based off people that are using PEDs if you’re not.

btw, there’s a PDF of the military athlete program floating around still… several of my buddies used that prior to going to Afghanistan a couple years back.


#14

Yeah, that Military Athlete plan is a great workout with emphasis on conditioning for a mountainous environment. BUT, our OP is going to OCS and he needs to keep things simple. The only physical test he needs to pass is the PRT. Even if he absolutely sucks at every other physical task he is given by his instructors, he will live and die by the PRT. And I guess a swim test.

When he gets to his command he get fancy and operate at operational level.

Also, I know you weren’t endorsing PEDs. At any rate, OP is a big boy and can make his own decisions. But he needs to ignore the bros benching 400 who juice and have mediocre PRT scores.


#15

I’ve been to several of the bases in Canada and most of the locker rooms and barracks washrooms have sharps containers in them.


#16

Focus on what will tested and assessed. You don’t need an “operator” training plan. You’re going to OCS, not a deployment as a tier 1 asset.