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Good Mornings... What Muscle?

Just a quick question. What muscle(s) does the excercise Good Mornings focus on? Thanks. Need to settle a small argument.

Hamstrings, glutes, and lower back. I think a straight-legged good morning works the lower back more, and the bent-leg works the hamstrings more, but I could be mistaken.

[quote]pomofo wrote:
Hamstrings, glutes, and lower back. I think a straight-legged good morning works the lower back more, and the bent-leg works the hamstrings more, but I could be mistaken.[/quote]

I think you are mistaken. Think about when you stretch your hamstrings; do you bend at the knees or keep your legs straight? The lowering portion of the lift will place more load on the hams. But ya hams, glutes, and lower back; a.k.a. posterior chain.

[quote]Snoop wrote:
pomofo wrote:
Hamstrings, glutes, and lower back. I think a straight-legged good morning works the lower back more, and the bent-leg works the hamstrings more, but I could be mistaken.

I think you are mistaken. Think about when you stretch your hamstrings; do you bend at the knees or keep your legs straight? The lowering portion of the lift will place more load on the hams. But ya hams, glutes, and lower back; a.k.a. posterior chain.[/quote]

Yeah, I wasn’t sure about that. Louie Simmons has written about straight-legged pullthroughs working the lower back and bent-leg working the hamstrings, so I assumed the same with good mornings, especially as a straight-leg good morning seems to utilize the hamstrings more as a stabilizer than as a prime mover. But then again good mornings are a pushing movement as opposed to the pulling motion of a pullthrough, so it could be just the opposite of pullthroughs.

Thanks for the input. Which would lead into my next question. Would you use Good Mornings as a primary hamstring workout or maybe a better question is where do you feel good mornings would fit into a workout?

Thanks again everyone.

But then again good mornings are a pushing movement as opposed to the pulling motion of a pullthrough, so it could be just the opposite of pullthroughs.[/quote]

I would really think of good mornings as more of a pulling movement than a pushing movement. Think about it: you are pulling the weight up with your PC much like a deadlift. You wouldn’t consider that a pushing movement would you?

On one your pulling on a cable the other pushing against a bar but they are both simimilar movements both posterior chain excersises and not opposites the way BP is push and Rows are pull. The push/pull distinction shouldnt be used between these two excersises. Also I could be completely wrong an its all the drugs I did this morning doing the talking.

I have always read that the posterior chain is HAMS-GLUTES-LOW BACK, recently a friend told me he believes it also includes the traps and the other postierior muscles. Anyone know if there is any agreement on what the posterior chain is?

But remember with the straight leg version once you bend your back more then 45 degrees the spinae erectie no longer work and it is your posterior ligaments of the back which take the strain which is not too good so you must always keep a slight bend in the knees (20 degrees) so the glutes take some of the strain.

[quote]eisej wrote:
Thanks for the input. Which would lead into my next question. Would you use Good Mornings as a primary hamstring workout or maybe a better question is where do you feel good mornings would fit into a workout?

Thanks again everyone.[/quote]

Good mornings could be a primary exercise for a hamstring workout. Just keep your chest out for a good back arch, and don’t bend your knees too much. Stick your ass out and you will feel the stretch in your hamstrings.

Technicaly, all movements are pull movements.Muscles don’t push, they pull.The result of the lever action of the pull can result in a pushing motion though, like the bench press or squat.
Based on that I call good mornings a pushing motion.The posterior chain contracts resulting in the weight across the shoulders to be pushed upward. If the load was on the other side, like a rom. deadlift it would be a pull.

I tend to work them in to a squat or deadlift day, with special attention on the level of exhaustion. I consider them a suplementary exercise. Hope that helps. I’ve been using the pullthroughs the same way, intergchangeably.

[quote]eisej wrote:
Thanks for the input. Which would lead into my next question. Would you use Good Mornings as a primary hamstring workout or maybe a better question is where do you feel good mornings would fit into a workout?

Thanks again everyone.

beerbarbq wrote:
Good mornings could be a primary exercise for a hamstring workout. Just keep your chest out for a good back arch, and don’t bend your knees too much. Stick your ass out and you will feel the stretch in your hamstrings.[/quote]

You might also consider Romanian Deadlifts for a good hamstring workout.

I thought the P-Chain was everything running from calves-Hams-Lowback-erectorspinae-traps with most of the tie ins included but I could be wrong. anyone else?

Very rarely would you consider the traps part of the posterior chain. The traps and scapulae do play a role in posture throughout the body, but dont contribute as much to the overall stability such as the erectae among others.

I do very light good mornings to mainly work my lower back.

For hamstrings I like stiff leg deadlifts. Good mornings are just too hard on your spine to start moving serious weight with them (not that ppl don’t, but it’s not wise)