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Gold Standard Exercise List - Link?


#1

Does anyone have a link for the "gold standard" list of exercises that old-time strongmen could or should perform?

IIRC, it was a long list which included exercises like the "two hands anyhow", the "continental and press".

It was written back in the 50's or 60's and I cannot find a link for it.

I believe it had weights listed according to bodyweight or had sort of a good, great, excellent grading.

Thanks, derek


#2

The Bob Hoffman Standards, which I found on Dan John's site:
http://danjohn.org/goldsilver.html

Also found the same chart with what looks like a small newpaper article about it from 1939:
http://www.americanpowerliftevolution.net/EightStandardLifts2c.html


#3

God damn it. I know that page. I was on it like 4 days ago. I'll go have a hunt.


#4

Thanks, so much guys. That is what I love about this site!


#5

Once again, the danjohn.org miracle!


#6

Yeah, this isn't the first time your site had helped me in my training.


#7

What was the first time it helped you. Please tell us all about it.


#8

I'm lookin at the chart but I don't understand the numbers. example:

Ab Raise- under the 132#, it says 70,62, 54...is that reps...weight..or why three of them.

Or for Bent Press at the bottom for 132#, it says 175, 155, 135...meaning what. 3 sets of that much weight or something else. And why are all the numbers in descending order.


#9

I would imagine it's gold,silver,bronze standards.


#10

Not sure if you're serious about your request but just in case...

Dan's site helped my do very well in my Highland Games comp. Especially in the caber.


#11

Hanley is right. It tells you the weights that a certain bodyweight SHOULD be able to lift ex. 198+ lbs means the lifter is a "heavyweight".

The first (and highest) number is the GOLD standard meaning the best, the second number is SILVER standard (second best) and BRONZE is obviously the ABSOLUTE MINIMUM a man at 198+ lbs should be able to lift.


#12

Some of these seem like really low numbers. The gold standard for a 198 pound man on the floor press is 260 lbs?

And then the stiff legged dl standards are almost the same as the regular dl standards. If you can stiff leg dl 470, is there any question that you could dl 520 regularly?


#13

I believe the floor press was heaved into position first. No racks.

Some weights seemed low but try pressing 225 overhead with one arm!


#14

So with no racks, these guys were tossing 300 plus pounds on there shoulders and then putting it on there back for squats.


#15

Well, more than that actually.

I will get the name (if someone doesn't get it before I remember it) of a guy who upended a 550 lb barbell, squatted down, rolled it across his shoulders, squatted it several times and returned the bar to the floor the same way.

This was routine way back then.


#16

unless I see it on youtube, i don't believe it


#17

There weren't too many camcorders in the 1930's!

The writers of iron game history who witnessed it must be wrong huh?

OK, got it. I believe his name was Joseph Curtis Hise.


#18

From Peary Rader;

In this he reminds me of Joseph Curtis Hise, who used to talk about 500 pound clean and jerks and 400 pound presses as if they were commonplace happenings. I thought he was crazy, for that was back in the days when the world record was 286 or so in the press and I thought that no one would go much above 300.

Now we find Hepburn doing around 400 pounds in the press and going up towards 500 in the jerk from squat stands. Hepburn is another man who works without mental inhibitions. He too recognizes no limits as far as ultimate power is concerned....


#19

Steinborn did 553 lbs in a full squat by upending it and rolling it onto his shoulders.


#20

I believe you, Derek...just a bad joke...but I still want Youtube video. Youtube wouldn't lie....it never lies.