T Nation

Goat Whey

How does it taste?

Has Biotest looked into it?

[quote]Dirty Tiger wrote:
How does it taste?

Has Biotest looked into it?[/quote]

Hmm seems it would be just whey from a goat instead of a cow, screams marketing ploy if its stated as something special. Next we could get Elephant or sheep whey :slight_smile:

what is supposed to be so special about it??

Phill

I’ve heard from a nutritionist that he recommends goat’s milk for infants and cow’s milk for older children/adults.

His reasoning is that cow’s milk profile will make the human baby grow like a calf, which will make the baby overweight.

Goat’s milk profile will make the human baby grow like a kid (baby goat). Which seems like an ideal/healthy bodyweight for a baby.

My point is, why drink goat’s milk if it’s recommended for an infant? If you want to get huge drink cow’s milk.

I’m not backing up his claim, I’m just giving some input. I’ll stick to my cow’s milk, thank you.

-Kevin

Yes on above poster ive heard some supposed benefits of the milk as well supposed. BUT were not even talking the milk were talking the whey. Where they isolate one type of pure protien so in all reality it should be damn near iof not identicle to cow whey.

Marketing, :slight_smile:

Phill

[quote]Phill wrote:
Dirty Tiger wrote:
How does it taste?

Has Biotest looked into it?

Hmm seems it would be just whey from a goat instead of a cow, screams marketing ploy if its stated as something special. Next we could get Elephant or sheep whey :slight_smile:

what is supposed to be so special about it??

Phill[/quote]

It’s supposed to be closer to human milk and have greater “bioavailability”.

“moo fuck cow milk”

–Lewis Black

It wouldn’t be economical. The reason that whey from cows is so cheap is all the dairies that produce milk, because whey is a by product of cheese production. So unless you can find someplace that produces a lot of goat cheese then it won’t be economical

[quote]tveddy wrote:
It wouldn’t be economical. The reason that whey from cows is so cheap is all the dairies that produce milk, because whey is a by product of cheese production. So unless you can find someplace that produces a lot of goat cheese then it won’t be economical[/quote]

I can see your point.

It is being made by a company called Oryx…but I live in the sticks so I would need to order it online.

Maybe it will catch on. Goat milk cheese is actually very common, it would make sense for some one to put all that whey to use.

Actually there are some pretty significant differences in the AA profiles of cows milk and goats (2x times as lysine in goats for instance) but I have no idea how these are distributed when you break them down into the different types of proteins.

The thing that is probably more important for most people is that the higher structure is different which has implications for allergy etc.

At the end of the day I don’t think anyone would notice any difference practically. If they did it probably only means they are relying on one source of protein too heavily.

Drew Price

I don’t know about the whey from goat milk, but I can attest that goat milk is an excellent bulking food. It is more caloric than regular whole milk and has more protein per 8oz serving (10g versus the 8g in cows milk). I have also found that it does not have near the bloating effect that drinking cows milk does.

I can drink a gallon or more in a day with no sense of bloating whatsoever. The Oryx company claims that this is because it has a higher bioavailability, but I do not know if this is true. I also know that the milk has a high concentration of antioxidants. Also I believe that goat milk has little to no lactose, making it the ideal milk replacement for those that are lactose-intollerant.

Here are some links, one has nutrition information on goats milk and the other on whole cows milk:

http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c201W.html

http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c2017.html

Notice the amino acid score, and the BCAA content.

There are some downsides to goat milk.

First off, alot of people cannot handle the flavor. Personally I do not notice a very big difference between Goat and Cow milk, however the Goat milk that I drink is unpasteurized because we have goats on me parents’ farm. The pasteurization definitely affects the smell (has the identical smell to chicken mcnuggets), but I am not sure about flavor because we don’t drink the pasteurized milk, we make soap from it.

Another downside for some people is that it is very expensive i’ve heard $5-9 for a quart. The only way for it to not be expensive is to own a goat, or find a family farm somewhere that will sell you some of their goatmilk. You want it as fresh as possible, and while unpasteurized milk cannot be sold for human consumption, if you find someone with goats that you trust, it will probably taste better.

Goat milk has a high fat content and it is difficult to get skim goat milk because it is naturally homogenized. Special equipment is needed to remove the fat.

So Goat milk is a better choice as far as nutrition and bodybuilding go, but for most people it is probably not worth the price/effort. If you can find a cost effective way of obtaining goat milk then definitely go for it.

I hope this info helps you,
Alex

[quote]Dirty Tiger wrote:
How does it taste?

Has Biotest looked into it?[/quote]

I’m not sure,but I do know that GNC is already selling a Goat whey protein powder supplement.

[quote]FAHall wrote:
I don’t know about the whey from goat milk, but I can attest that goat milk is an excellent bulking food. It is more caloric than regular whole milk and has more protein per 8oz serving (10g versus the 8g in cows milk). I have also found that it does not have near the bloating effect that drinking cows milk does.

I can drink a gallon or more in a day with no sense of bloating whatsoever. The Oryx company claims that this is because it has a higher bioavailability, but I do not know if this is true. I also know that the milk has a high concentration of antioxidants. Also I believe that goat milk has little to no lactose, making it the ideal milk replacement for those that are lactose-intollerant.

Here are some links, one has nutrition information on goats milk and the other on whole cows milk:

http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c201W.html

http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c2017.html

Notice the amino acid score, and the BCAA content.

There are some downsides to goat milk.

First off, alot of people cannot handle the flavor. Personally I do not notice a very big difference between Goat and Cow milk, however the Goat milk that I drink is unpasteurized because we have goats on me parents’ farm. The pasteurization definitely affects the smell (has the identical smell to chicken mcnuggets), but I am not sure about flavor because we don’t drink the pasteurized milk, we make soap from it.

Another downside for some people is that it is very expensive i’ve heard $5-9 for a quart. The only way for it to not be expensive is to own a goat, or find a family farm somewhere that will sell you some of their goatmilk. You want it as fresh as possible, and while unpasteurized milk cannot be sold for human consumption, if you find someone with goats that you trust, it will probably taste better.

Goat milk has a high fat content and it is difficult to get skim goat milk because it is naturally homogenized. Special equipment is needed to remove the fat.

So Goat milk is a better choice as far as nutrition and bodybuilding go, but for most people it is probably not worth the price/effort. If you can find a cost effective way of obtaining goat milk then definitely go for it.

I hope this info helps you,
Alex[/quote]

That was the most informative goat milk post I have ever read.

FASCINATING stuff, Alex. Thank you! :slight_smile: Looks like goat cheese will tide me over until I win the lottery or own a farm.

The sugar in goats milk is lactose, just as the sugar in cows, human and other mammals milk is lactose.

Here are some links, one has nutrition information on goats milk and the other on whole cows milk:

http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c201W.html

http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c2017.html

Notice the amino acid score, and the BCAA content.[/quote]

Something is not quite right with those figures.

Using USDA figures (the most accurate figures available for food in the USA) for amino acid content, and comparing these to the IOM amino acid requirements and WHO/FAO provides a different idea.

Cows milk gives a IOM amino acid score of 136 and goat 138.

If we use the WHO/FAO requirements, that is 127 and 131 for cows and goats milk respectively. For a reference, human milk (taken from USDA database) would provide an IOM value of 120 and WHO/FAO value of 114

The difference between nutritionfacts and USDA appear to be predominantly lysine.

Branch chain amino acid concentration is somewhere around 21-22g/100gram protein in humans, cows and goats milk.

Oh and in terms of casein in goats milk. Both cows nad goat milk are a casein dominant milk, with approximately 75% of total protein in goat and 80% in cows.

Both cows nad goats milk contain Beta-casein, the main differences are in the alpha caseins, with cows milk containing a split of 80% Alpha S1 nad 20% alpha S2. Goats milk generally (there are some that produce a lot more) little alpha S1, and a resulting greater level of alpha s2. This raised level of alpha s2 creates a softer curd, which is part of the claim around easier digestion from goats milk.

I’d like to know too… but in the meantime, since I’ve developed a whey allergy, this looks to be a good alternative!

BUT again we were not talking about the MILK the question was about a fraction of the milk the whey after being isolated and well its still whey no matter if its a goat, kangaroo, cow etc. It whey from a diffent parent source.

Phill

The reported marketing claim behind goat’s milk v cow’s milk is that those supplying the goat’s milk raw materials are stating that b/c it’s not pasteurized, as is the case w/ cow’s milk, goat’s milk supposedly retains more protein fractions.

That’s the marketing…not the scientific facts.

Since there’s nothing on human absorption, here’s where we get a bit bizarre - attached is a study that compared the amino acid absorption and net protein effects of goat’s milk v cow’s milk…in piglets. You really have to love studies like that.

The Cliff’s Notes is that the amino acid profiles of the two milk protein sources was not significantly different, and the net protein effects were also comparable b/w the two milk sources.

Hope that helps provide you some unbiased info, regarding the topic. - chris

[quote]Lockwood wrote:
The reported marketing claim behind goat’s milk v cow’s milk is that those supplying the goat’s milk raw materials are stating that b/c it’s not pasteurized, as is the case w/ cow’s milk, goat’s milk supposedly retains more protein fractions.

That’s the marketing…not the scientific facts.

Since there’s nothing on human absorption, here’s where we get a bit bizarre - attached is a study that compared the amino acid absorption and net protein effects of goat’s milk v cow’s milk…in piglets. You really have to love studies like that.

The Cliff’s Notes is that the amino acid profiles of the two milk protein sources was not significantly different, and the net protein effects were also comparable b/w the two milk sources.

Hope that helps provide you some unbiased info, regarding the topic. - chris

[/quote]

There are some high quality goat whey protein powders out there that use raw goats milk and still have probiotics and the enzyme lactase,which is probably better than the average whey protein powder.

I realize that it’s a whey protein, but I’m specifically allergic to cow’s milk proteins - for example, I can eat goat’s cheese to my hearts’ content and I’m a-ok. I bet goat whey powder would be fine too. The structure of goat whey must be different than the structure of cow whey.

Any additional comments or experiences with the goats whey??