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Goal is to Join the US Air Force

My goal is to join the US Air Force. Right now,I have 30 pounds to lose. Ive been working out using heavy lifting, sprints, metabolic conditioning (sleds, sandbags, undergroundstrengthcoach.com stufff), and swimming since I know those will be the best way to help me lose weight much better than running endless miles, plus it will make me look better nekid.

However, at least a few months before I go, Id like to switch to a program with more endurance based workouts similar to what Ill be required to do in basic. This will have the added benefit of being able to do my workout anywhere since I wont need a gym and this is good because me and my friend joining with me already have plans to do a lot of stuff and go a lot of places before we go to basic and wont be able to.

Also, even if I keep my current program until I ship out, I wont be doing anything like my current program.

Heres my question. I have a fear that once I switch to long runs and huge sets of pushups, pullups, and situps a lot of muscle that wont be needed anymore will disapeer. Not to bad in and of itself, but my fear continues into believing that muscle will become fat. Is any part of that fear accurate?

Or will I lose the muscle but since Ill still be keeping active it will just burn off as energy? I dont look like a gorilla or anything, nor would I want to be that big, but I dont want to end up looking like a flabby little marathon runner either…

[quote]benos4752 wrote:

Heres my question.

  1. I have a fear that once I switch to long runs and huge sets of pushups, pullups, and situps a lot of muscle that wont be needed anymore will disapeer.

  2. Not to bad in and of itself, but my fear continues into believing that muscle will become fat.

  3. Or will I lose the muscle but since Ill still be keeping active it will just burn off as energy?
    [/quote]

  4. It most likely will.

  5. This is physiologically impossible.

  6. It depends on your caloric intake/expenditure: yes, if you don’t eat too much.

Oh there are no airborne rangers in the airforce (in the airforce)
Oh there are no airborne rangers in the airforce (in the airforce)
All they do is learn to fly
Then they crash and burn and die
Oh there are no airborne rangers in the airforce (in the airforce)

why can’t you continue to weight train leading up to basic?

Basic training is a walk in the park it is more mental then physically demanding and it’s the air force they are civies in uniform so I wouldn’t panic.

The first thing you need to do is get your head right, do you want to compete in a body building championship or pass basic and train to that goal.

P.S strong legs help on those up hill pack marchs, if the air force even do that !

As for a program of stuff you can do with out a gym

When I started to train for basic back in 2000 I ran 4kms every 2nd morning walked 5kms with a weighted pack every other morning.

In the after noons I did a lot of body weight work in the pool such as swim 100 meters then 50 dips on the side of the pool with your legs still in the water. Water running was also another fav of mine you need a floatation belt and you run it really hammers the legs.

And ever night before I went to bed I did one set of max push ups then 5 sets of half of that with 1min break in between sets.

But I was only 17 I had never been to a gym before and had no idea about training and I still don’t but it worked so I much have done something right.

I also did alot of push ups, I wasn’t strong enough at the time to do pull ups at the time.

When i went through we did PT six says a week. 3 days of running and 3 days of calisthenics. The Air Force PT test consists of 4 componenets and they’re all pretty easy.
You get 10 points for doing 62 or more pushups in 1 minute, 10 points for 55 or more sit ups in a minute, 30 points for having a waist measurement 32" or below and 50 points for running 1.5 miles in 9:36 or less. You lose points accordingly for falling short of those standards and you need a 75 to pass. The workouts you’re doing should prepare you more than adequately.

You don’t need to run great distances but work some intervals into the running that you already do to build your 1.5 mile speed. Obviously, you won’t get to lift weights during BMT but that’s probably for the better as you don’t get much time to eat or many protein options for that matter. BMT will be over in no time and then it’s on to tech school where you’ll be able to pick right back up with the weight training. Hope this helps,

Mark

[quote]jzzz wrote:

The first thing you need to do is get your head right, do you want to compete in a body building championship or pass basic and train to that goal.

[/quote]

once again, why can’t you do both at the same time?

[quote]HolyMacaroni wrote:
jzzz wrote:

The first thing you need to do is get your head right, do you want to compete in a body building championship or pass basic and train to that goal.

once again, why can’t you do both at the same time?[/quote]

You can but the fitness tests arnt how much you squat or how heavy your curl is I know weight training helps with this but the op said he can make it into the gym.
Train for what you need to pass if that means more time on the track and less time in the gym so be it.

Thats my view I’m sure others will be different.

You’re going to be running is basic. Best way to get good at running? Turns out it’s running.

In the mornings, jog one day, do metabolic stuff the next. Take one day a week off.

Lift in the afternoons/nights. It’s that easy.

Wow, I didn’t know the airforce pt test was that easy. I like the waist measurement though, keeps the fatties in check.

OP: There is no reason why you can’t weight train right up until you leave. I’m normally not a fan of total body workouts, but I would say training heavy with total body 3x a week, running 3-4 miles 2x a week, and pushups/situps to failure 2x a week is doable given the right amount of recovery (sleep) and nutrition.

That way you will still keep your strenght while increasing endurance. If airforce basic is anything like infantry in the army, which I’m sure it isn’t, you’re probably going to lose mass. It happens, but once you’re done it comes back.

On a side note: You probably already signed the papers, but if you didn’t, make sure your career in the military transfers over to a civilian job, otherwise what’s the point? I love the infantry, but I joined as 19 year old who wanted to kick ass and while it’s paying for college, there is no transfer into the civilian world outside of merc/law enforcement. Just some food for thought.

[quote]fireflyz wrote:
Wow, I didn’t know the airforce pt test was that easy. I like the waist measurement though, keeps the fatties in check.

OP: There is no reason why you can’t weight train right up until you leave. I’m normally not a fan of total body workouts, but I would say training heavy with total body 3x a week, running 3-4 miles 2x a week, and pushups/situps to failure 2x a week is doable given the right amount of recovery (sleep) and nutrition.

That way you will still keep your strenght while increasing endurance. If airforce basic is anything like infantry in the army, which I’m sure it isn’t, you’re probably going to lose mass. It happens, but once you’re done it comes back.

On a side note: You probably already signed the papers, but if you didn’t, make sure your career in the military transfers over to a civilian job, otherwise what’s the point? I love the infantry, but I joined as 19 year old who wanted to kick ass and while it’s paying for college, there is no transfer into the civilian world outside of merc/law enforcement. Just some food for thought.[/quote]

x2 on the job, don’t go in general.

I was AirForce 8 years ago and yes basic is easy, but I lost 15lbs in 6 weeks and was already pretty skinny at 6ft 189lbs. So I finished even skinnier. Oh well, it came back quickly, I got focused in Tech school and gained it all back quickly.

Don’t worry about getting in shape for basic you’ll get into shape running that 1.5 miles three times a week. You have six weeks before you have to pass the PT test or 5 weeks or something, no big deal at all. Just train with weights, get to your body fat percentage before getting there and have at it.

[quote]benos4752 wrote:
My goal is to join the US Air Force. Right now,I have 30 pounds to lose. Ive been working out using heavy lifting, sprints, metabolic conditioning (sleds, sandbags, undergroundstrengthcoach.com stufff), and swimming since I know those will be the best way to help me lose weight much better than running endless miles, plus it will make me look better nekid.

However, at least a few months before I go, Id like to switch to a program with more endurance based workouts similar to what Ill be required to do in basic. This will have the added benefit of being able to do my workout anywhere since I wont need a gym and this is good because me and my friend joining with me already have plans to do a lot of stuff and go a lot of places before we go to basic and wont be able to.

Also, even if I keep my current program until I ship out, I wont be doing anything like my current program.

Heres my question. I have a fear that once I switch to long runs and huge sets of pushups, pullups, and situps a lot of muscle that wont be needed anymore will disapeer. Not to bad in and of itself, but my fear continues into believing that muscle will become fat. Is any part of that fear accurate?

Or will I lose the muscle but since Ill still be keeping active it will just burn off as energy? I dont look like a gorilla or anything, nor would I want to be that big, but I dont want to end up looking like a flabby little marathon runner either…[/quote]

Air Force BMT is now 8.5 weeks long. During the 7th week you will take your PT test. The requirements for passing are:

*1.5 Miles in 11:57 or less.
*45 Push-Ups in 1 minute.
*50 Sit-Ups in 1 minute.

None of these are especially difficult to accomplish. When you’re in BMT you will lose muscle and fat. Meals are quick and sparse (3 a day with anywhere from 2-5 minutes to eat). You’ll pick up the right eating techniques to maximize the amount of food you can get down in that period of time. I suggest training your body to meet those standards.

Also, depending on your flight and how often you get punished, you’ll be doing a lot of push-ups, flutter kicks, squat-thrusts, planks, etc. If you want an ideal training program I suggest you work running and body weight exercises.

If you can make enough progress before you get there and use the BMT PT program to top off your training you may be able to get Warkhawk standards for PT. They are as follows:

*1.5 Miles in 8:55 or less.
*65 Push-Ups in 1 minute.
*70 Situ-Ups in 1 minute.
*10 Pull-Ups

Just remember, training for BMT is going to involve being ready to do large amounts of the body weight exercises I listed above and being able to run relatively well. Also if I remember correctly, on running days during basic it was usually broken up into 3 events that span about 40+ minutes.

The first event is a “Last Runner Up” which last about 10-12 minutes. Followed by a 1-2 minute fast walk. Then you have a 10-12 minute self pace run (don’t half ass it) followed by another 1-2 minute walk. Last you run 30 second sprints multiple times followed by a short walk after each sprint.

Once you get out of basic, the standards and PT sessions are no where near as demanding. If you want to get off the cardio and start weight training for real, then go for it.

You’re going to lose weight. Everyone does. Especially if you’re already large going in. The MTIs will make sure of it. Don’t worry about muscle loss. You’ll maintain what you need. This is just a short hiccup in your training. So don’t sweat the small things. Get ready and get to it!

It’s been about 2 years since I went through basic. I missed the 8.5 week crap they started, but you’ll do fine. The system is really setup for you to succeed. Good luck and maybe I’ll see you around in the future.