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Glute Training for Combat Athletes

Have any of you guys tried any of the exercises in this article ?

dispelling the glute myth:

Specifically, I am interested in knowing if you guys feel that the strength moves, like the barbell hip thrust, are beneficial for combat athletes.

Thanks

Yes…

you need glute activation drills/work to keep your knees tracking properly
and keep your hips healthy
grappler’s hips take a beating and Im sure plenty fighters have knees that track poorly

Im 38 so I need to do more activation work before squats,deads ect. to keep mobile
thin of it as preventive steps for you youngesters

if your not doing single leg glute bridges as part of your mobility , you should be.
Healthy hips are important- so is getting the glutes to fire they are some of the most powerful muscles in the body.

the weighted hip thrusts or air humps - I played them work the entire Pchain- pretty hard.
Any athlete can use a strong Pchain.

thanks kmcnyc, very appreciated

I do the unweighted stuff a lot. Just waiting for my adductor tear to heal to try out the weighted ones

yeah, I already do the unweighted stuff for glute activation, but I think Ill start incorporating some of the weighted ones.

I think that the strength to drive your hips up, like a hip bump in grappling, can definitely be benefited by resistance training.

But I’m not sure how useful it is to include glute-specific moves over general hip extension exercises.

For example, doing KB swings led to a strong upa or hip bump for me. But also doing weighted back extensions did as well.

The problem for me with KB swings is that they don’t feel like they hit the low back that well, so then I need a low back exercise (if I want to keep it strong) and the swings. In trying to keep my workouts as streamlined as possible, so that I have energy to train Jiu-Jitsu and lift, I’d rather omit them and stick with back extensions.

JME, and I have used some glute-briging and felt the same way about those as the swings.

[quote]Bram Wiley wrote:
I think that the strength to drive your hips up, like a hip bump in grappling, can definitely be benefited by resistance training.

But I’m not sure how useful it is to include glute-specific moves over general hip extension exercises.

For example, doing KB swings led to a strong upa or hip bump for me. But also doing weighted back extensions did as well.

The problem for me with KB swings is that they don’t feel like they hit the low back that well, so then I need a low back exercise (if I want to keep it strong) and the swings. In trying to keep my workouts as streamlined as possible, so that I have energy to train Jiu-Jitsu and lift, I’d rather omit them and stick with back extensions.

JME, and I have used some glute-briging and felt the same way about those as the swings.[/quote]

I always thought rounded back GMs would have good carry-over to grappling sports. You would obviously want to keep teh weights relatively light to avoid injury, but I think they would have more carryover than arched back exercises.

[quote]dhickey wrote:
Bram Wiley wrote:
I think that the strength to drive your hips up, like a hip bump in grappling, can definitely be benefited by resistance training.

But I’m not sure how useful it is to include glute-specific moves over general hip extension exercises.

For example, doing KB swings led to a strong upa or hip bump for me. But also doing weighted back extensions did as well.

The problem for me with KB swings is that they don’t feel like they hit the low back that well, so then I need a low back exercise (if I want to keep it strong) and the swings. In trying to keep my workouts as streamlined as possible, so that I have energy to train Jiu-Jitsu and lift, I’d rather omit them and stick with back extensions.

JME, and I have used some glute-briging and felt the same way about those as the swings.

I always thought rounded back GMs would have good carry-over to grappling sports. You would obviously want to keep teh weights relatively light to avoid injury, but I think they would have more carryover than arched back exercises.[/quote]

I would not want to do any excercise with a rounded back. Big injury risk. I work very hard to keep my lumbar spine in a neutral position whatever I am doing.

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I’ve heard some people advocate rounded-back deadlifting for grappling sports. Alexander Karelin, 3 time gold medalist in wrestling, was famous for pulling 300lb guys off the ground with a rounded back:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHOA-VrcRZU

The issue I’ve heard with avoiding rounded lifts, is that in grappling you will often find yourself in that position (passing guard comes to mind). Without a specific groove for it, your body may not be conditioned as well.

I know Steve Maxwell (Jiu-Jitsu black belt who’s worked with the Ribeiro brothers for their conditioning) is a fan, found this quote from him:

For fighters, especially MMA and grapplers, sandbag deadlifts with a round back style, bear hug style or grasping the cloth straightback style.
Partner lifts form the single leg, body lock or double leg position are also very beneficial. Barbell deadlifts are great for general strength
but they are a ‘grooved’ lift. Strength must be built in every position in the fighting game and barbell deadlifts just don’t get it done.

I haven’t done them in the weight room, just passing on the info.

Rounded back is fine- think thoracic not lumbar.

the phase neutral spine usually refers to the lumbar-lower back positioning not upper back.
rounding of the upper back wont lead to injury if its controlled

for wrestling in particular your going to see lots of people will display a rounded back as part of their stance and thats’ ok too.
your-e not going to see anyone who looks like they are about to deadlift or end the first pull of an o-lift-
in wrestling or bjj - and have any kind of mobility.

round back zerchers would be fine and probably better then good mornings- which seem to bother my neck.

I don’t think kettle bell swings are in the same realm as the weighted glute bridge-air humps
they are more of a conditioning tool then a strength move.

the air humps on the other hand could be a used as a ME maximum effort strength builder.
the air humps will light your legs up from the ankle to waist and also engage the low back
better then most other work and as well as other direct low back work.

ok cool. I did specify neutral lumbar spine. A degree of rounding in the T spine shouldn’t be an issue. If you see powerlifters and O lifters may effort you will see rounding in the T spine, and as you have said, in a bear hug or bodylock there has to be some degree of rounding in the T Spine.