T Nation

Glute Ham Raise


#1

Anybody think GHR is overrated? Or is it underrated?


#2

What would Jesus do?


#3

Definitely underrated IMO.


#4

under rated, GHRs kill.
seen lots of gym rats who can’t do a single rep.


#5

[quote]sumabeast wrote:
under rated, GHRs kill.
seen lots of gym rats who can’t do a single rep.[/quote]

at my gym I only see the other powerlifters do them…same thing with the reverse hyper. everyone else uses it to put there cellphones, water, etc on top of it.

when I use the GHR everyone looks at me like am crazy.


#6

overrated

if i had to pick between these two routines:

one:

  • squat
  • barbell lunge
  • ghr
  • reverse hyper

two:

  • squat
  • barbell lunge
  • leg curl
  • reverse hyper

i’d go with routine two…

ghr bench is a nice tool but it’s nothing special… poor man’s ghr bench (sorinex) is 100x harder so not many people can do that… i’d rather hit the hamstrings purely as a flexor with leg curls & then hit them as hip extensors in squat/barbell lunge/reverse hyper…

ghr bench is overhyped IMO.

peace


#7

I don’t know about overrated or underrated, but I think they are probably under-utilized. Personally, I do slow eccentric natural ghr’s as part of my deadlift routine. I do 3 sets of 5 reps at 20 seconds apiece, supersetted with leg curls. Kills my hamstrings. Wish I would have found them when I was younger and still a competitive athlete (basketball, volleyball).

At 32 years old, my vert has gone way done over the years, but after adding these into my workouts, I have never in my life sprinted faster than I do now. Don’t know the reason or if it’s applicable to anyone else, just my experience.


#8

How hard you train and intelligently you plan your reps/intensity is more important than the exercises you use (within reason of course). Especially if the exercises aren’t specific (i.e. you are a powerlifter) to your sport. That being said, I can’t see why someone would prefer leg curls to GHRs.


#9

ghr > leg curl
def. underrated i’m the only one to use the ghr for its purpose in my gym. the only other time i’ve seen it in use is for abs or a towel holder for ppl doing biceps or chest on the cable crossovers


#10

I think one of the major points that is missed when GHR’s are discussed is that for a powerlifter, when they are in a meet cycle it is basically a blessing to be able to perform an accesory movement that targets the muscles a GHR does, in as effective of a manner as they do, without having to utilize a barbell.

We do a lot of supersetting after DL workouts of glute/ham raises (sets of 6, sometimes bare, sometimes with bands around our necks, sometimes holding weight) and reverse hypers (sets of 15) and I can tell you after a heavy DL workout you are very pleased to just be able to do a movement and not touch a bar.

Not to mention how brutally effective they are as an accesory movement.

I think they are highly under rated. I rarely walk into a high school where they are utilized correctly. It’s a shame


#11

[quote]OBoile wrote:
How hard you train and intelligently you plan your reps/intensity is more important than the exercises you use (within reason of course). Especially if the exercises aren’t specific (i.e. you are a powerlifter) to your sport. That being said, I can’t see why someone would prefer leg curls to GHRs.[/quote]

for sprinting, i would prefer leg curl over ghr because it is:

  • more specific to the recovery leg
  • open chain
  • and you can dorsiflex
  • also, single leg variation makes more sense than single leg ghr… you can get anyone doing single leg leg-curls… you have to progress an athlete for who knows how long to be able to perform single leg ghr’s (mostly eccentrics).

peace

edit: lol

“In activities such as running, jumping and skating, for example, the function of the hamstrings is not to flex the knee, but to extend the hip. So to develop functional strength for these activities, you want to do hip extension exercises where your foot is in contact with the ground. This is referred to as a closed-chain exercise. An open-chain is when your foot is not in contact with the ground, such as the leg curl.”

in sprinting the hamstrings do not flex the knee! regurgitate!

ahah.


#12

Uhhhh, now you are aware that the GHR was developed in the Eastern block to make white men sprint like black men, aren’t you?

Now before all the racist zealots freak out, this is fact. It was developed to increase sprinting performance.

[quote]adarqui wrote:
OBoile wrote:
How hard you train and intelligently you plan your reps/intensity is more important than the exercises you use (within reason of course). Especially if the exercises aren’t specific (i.e. you are a powerlifter) to your sport. That being said, I can’t see why someone would prefer leg curls to GHRs.

for sprinting, i would prefer leg curl over ghr because it is:

  • more specific to the recovery leg
  • open chain
  • and you can dorsiflex
  • also, single leg variation makes more sense than single leg ghr… you can get anyone doing single leg leg-curls… you have to progress an athlete for who knows how long to be able to perform single leg ghr’s (mostly eccentrics).

peace

edit: lol

“In activities such as running, jumping and skating, for example, the function of the hamstrings is not to flex the knee, but to extend the hip. So to develop functional strength for these activities, you want to do hip extension exercises where your foot is in contact with the ground. This is referred to as a closed-chain exercise. An open-chain is when your foot is not in contact with the ground, such as the leg curl.”

in sprinting the hamstrings do not flex the knee! regurgitate!

ahah.[/quote]


#13

We have one at my gym. Some guys use it every week, some occasionally, some not at all. I have seen very strong guys struggle to do a set of 5 cheat reps with the knees way off the pad. I have seen kinda weak guys rep-out on it with a purple band across their shoulders.

It is a good glute/hamstring exercise that does not require holding a barbell. Nothing more- nothign less.

I don’t think it will change your lifting drasticly- but you’ll never know if you don’t try.


#14

[quote]apwsearch wrote:
Uhhhh, now you are aware that the GHR was developed in the Eastern block to make white men sprint like black men, aren’t you?

Now before all the racist zealots freak out, this is fact. It was developed to increase sprinting performance.

adarqui wrote:
OBoile wrote:
How hard you train and intelligently you plan your reps/intensity is more important than the exercises you use (within reason of course). Especially if the exercises aren’t specific (i.e. you are a powerlifter) to your sport. That being said, I can’t see why someone would prefer leg curls to GHRs.

for sprinting, i would prefer leg curl over ghr because it is:

  • more specific to the recovery leg
  • open chain
  • and you can dorsiflex
  • also, single leg variation makes more sense than single leg ghr… you can get anyone doing single leg leg-curls… you have to progress an athlete for who knows how long to be able to perform single leg ghr’s (mostly eccentrics).

peace

edit: lol

“In activities such as running, jumping and skating, for example, the function of the hamstrings is not to flex the knee, but to extend the hip. So to develop functional strength for these activities, you want to do hip extension exercises where your foot is in contact with the ground. This is referred to as a closed-chain exercise. An open-chain is when your foot is not in contact with the ground, such as the leg curl.”

in sprinting the hamstrings do not flex the knee! regurgitate!

ahah.

[/quote]

thats why a bunch of eastern bloc white sprinters have broken sub-10 right?

ghr’s must be magical…

k.

edit: you know what was also developed to make white men sprint like black men? nike flex nimbo : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdwX90w7w3k


#15

its way underrated.


#16

[quote]adarqui wrote:
OBoile wrote:
How hard you train and intelligently you plan your reps/intensity is more important than the exercises you use (within reason of course). Especially if the exercises aren’t specific (i.e. you are a powerlifter) to your sport. That being said, I can’t see why someone would prefer leg curls to GHRs.

for sprinting, i would prefer leg curl over ghr because it is:

  • more specific to the recovery leg
  • open chain
  • and you can dorsiflex
  • also, single leg variation makes more sense than single leg ghr… you can get anyone doing single leg leg-curls… you have to progress an athlete for who knows how long to be able to perform single leg ghr’s (mostly eccentrics).

peace

edit: lol

“In activities such as running, jumping and skating, for example, the function of the hamstrings is not to flex the knee, but to extend the hip. So to develop functional strength for these activities, you want to do hip extension exercises where your foot is in contact with the ground. This is referred to as a closed-chain exercise. An open-chain is when your foot is not in contact with the ground, such as the leg curl.”

in sprinting the hamstrings do not flex the knee! regurgitate!

ahah.[/quote]

that makes no sense. you talk about doing leg curls because its open chain but the quote you use recommeneds close chained. no if you want to develop sprint speed strength then rdl’s or good mornings would be what you want to do.

the hamstring is designed to extend the hip AND curl the leg. the hamstring does both. in your reference you only mention hip extension and use that to justify leg curls. how about you train the hamstring to do both; extend the hip and curl the leg, then it will be strong in both its functions and not have strength discrepencies.


#17

[quote]krpv wrote:
Anybody think GHR is overrated? Or is it underrated? [/quote]

how big are your hamstrings? how much can you deadlift/rdl/leg curl? if you arent maxed out genetically then its kind of moot fucking point. it sounds like you dont want to do them and are looking for justification. the real question is what are your goals? based on that answer then you can decide whether GHR fit for YOU and YOUR program.


#18

[quote]seth.ewan wrote:
adarqui wrote:
OBoile wrote:
How hard you train and intelligently you plan your reps/intensity is more important than the exercises you use (within reason of course). Especially if the exercises aren’t specific (i.e. you are a powerlifter) to your sport. That being said, I can’t see why someone would prefer leg curls to GHRs.

for sprinting, i would prefer leg curl over ghr because it is:

  • more specific to the recovery leg
  • open chain
  • and you can dorsiflex
  • also, single leg variation makes more sense than single leg ghr… you can get anyone doing single leg leg-curls… you have to progress an athlete for who knows how long to be able to perform single leg ghr’s (mostly eccentrics).

peace

edit: lol

“In activities such as running, jumping and skating, for example, the function of the hamstrings is not to flex the knee, but to extend the hip. So to develop functional strength for these activities, you want to do hip extension exercises where your foot is in contact with the ground. This is referred to as a closed-chain exercise. An open-chain is when your foot is not in contact with the ground, such as the leg curl.”

in sprinting the hamstrings do not flex the knee! regurgitate!

ahah.

that makes no sense. you talk about doing leg curls because its open chain but the quote you use recommeneds close chained. no if you want to develop sprint speed strength then rdl’s or good mornings would be what you want to do.

the hamstring is designed to extend the hip AND curl the leg. the hamstring does both. in your reference you only mention hip extension and use that to justify leg curls. how about you train the hamstring to do both; extend the hip and curl the leg, then it will be strong in both its functions and not have strength discrepencies.[/quote]

some of the people on this forum are so frustrating… read my first damn post in this thread:

"ghr bench is a nice tool but it’s nothing special… poor man’s ghr bench (sorinex) is 100x harder so not many people can do that… i’d rather hit the hamstrings purely as a flexor with leg curls & then hit them as hip extensors in squat/barbell lunge/reverse hyper…
"

done posting in this thread.

bye.


#19

[quote]adarqui wrote:

  • and you can dorsiflex
    [/quote]

There SHOULD be dorsiflexion when doing GHRs. As in, on a real GHR bench. Dorsiflex on the eccentric, plantarflex on the concentric.

Personally, I’m not convinced that there’s anything magical about GHRs. I think one can get plenty strong with just barbell exercises. But I’d definitely take GHRs over leg curls.

Also, IMO GHRs are one of the most bastardized exercises out there. When done right, body weight should be difficult. On the other hand, it’s easy to start piling on weight/bands if you turn it into a cheat back extension, but that defeats the whole purpose of doing them.


#20

[quote]seth.ewan wrote:
adarqui wrote:
OBoile wrote:
How hard you train and intelligently you plan your reps/intensity is more important than the exercises you use (within reason of course). Especially if the exercises aren’t specific (i.e. you are a powerlifter) to your sport. That being said, I can’t see why someone would prefer leg curls to GHRs.

for sprinting, i would prefer leg curl over ghr because it is:

  • more specific to the recovery leg
  • open chain
  • and you can dorsiflex
  • also, single leg variation makes more sense than single leg ghr… you can get anyone doing single leg leg-curls… you have to progress an athlete for who knows how long to be able to perform single leg ghr’s (mostly eccentrics).

peace

edit: lol

“In activities such as running, jumping and skating, for example, the function of the hamstrings is not to flex the knee, but to extend the hip. So to develop functional strength for these activities, you want to do hip extension exercises where your foot is in contact with the ground. This is referred to as a closed-chain exercise. An open-chain is when your foot is not in contact with the ground, such as the leg curl.”

in sprinting the hamstrings do not flex the knee! regurgitate!

ahah.

that makes no sense. you talk about doing leg curls because its open chain but the quote you use recommeneds close chained. no if you want to develop sprint speed strength then rdl’s or good mornings would be what you want to do.

the hamstring is designed to extend the hip AND curl the leg. the hamstring does both. in your reference you only mention hip extension and use that to justify leg curls. how about you train the hamstring to do both; extend the hip and curl the leg, then it will be strong in both its functions and not have strength discrepencies.[/quote]

I didn’t really get that either. After reading that quote (and before actually) I would have thought an exercise that works the hamstrings over both joints would be more specific to sprinting. Anyway, I still can’t understand why someone would prefer leg curls to ghrs.