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Glucose Drink after Training?

Hello, is this good to have once a day after each training session along with a protein shake?

No!

Save your money, put a squirt of this in your protein shake.
image

Or eat a banana.

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Timing does not matter unless you are on insulin. As far as macros go - well if you need these macros then its good to have any time. If you dont need em then you are just storing it just like any other carb.

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Guess what I’m now justifying. Over time, this will slide all the way to a banana split

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That’s how I turn vanilla protein shakes into chocolate. :+1:

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I’ve read that glucose drinks help your muscles to use protein to repair them so having something that’s quick drinking and ingesting for carbs is a must for after a workout. These drinks are only 50 pence and only buying three of them for after each workout three times a week because I’m following stronglifts 5x5 is honestly not that much. £1.50 isn’t going to burn a hole in my pocket compared to stuff like protein powder depending on how much quality protein powder you want. This is just my way of thinking.

Maybe, but I would just get fat drinking stuff like that. I think when it comes to stuff like this, the answer often lies with the person interested. Are you someone who struggles to gain weight? Are you someone who just tries to cut a bit less to bulk? If you are the latter stay away. If the former might be a good option. In the middle? Maybe try it for a little bit, and see what it does to you.

Keep in mind too that this type of stuff has a small impact on your results compared to the training, overall diet and sleep.

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My nutrition and training is in check (if you consider stronglifts 5x5 as a proper program for 3 times a week?). I’m cutting as I’m severely overweight but I figured that one glucose drink won’t harm me as long as I’m staying below 1900 calories. I burn about 500-700 calories a day just doing activities because I’m on a sports course and we’re active most days. So that much burned gives me a bit of room to drink the sugary drink 3x a week. Plus I’m not counting how many cals I burn while training 3x a week because that’s near impossible unless you have scientific knowledge and equipment to measure co2 qnd other stuff.

At least for me, trying to eat in a deficit is much harder if I am drinking calories. YMMV, but I wouldn’t even consider a glucose drink during a cut.

How many grams of glucose is in that? 50 g? That is an extra 200 calories you don’t get to eat.

It’s 145 calories for 35g of carbs, 19g of sugar.

These are counterproductive. Training and nutrition should be coordinated towards one goal for better results.

This is extremely low calories for an active 230+ pound guy. Bodyweight x 10 is a general rule of thumb for the low-end of calories when cutting.

On the original topic, I’d have some carbs and protein during training rather than after. That’s going to be a lot easier with one drink that contains both rather than a carb drink and a separate protein drink. You’ll get more bang for the fat-loss buck if you keep carbs a bit lower throughout the day before training and prioritize them immediately around the workout and after.

I will say I felt like I benefited the most from intraworkout carbs when cutting. I understand it’s calories I have to account for, but it got me through workouts when calories were low and let me not have to time my meals perfectly.

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How’s training for powerlifting counter productive? What programme should I be following for cutting? I’m 234.8lbs atm. Mostly fat though. I tried 2000 calories and was maintaining which is why I lowered it too 1900 and now I’m losing weight again. Slowly but it’s definitely coming off, that’s the main thing. Also I’m on olanzapine for Phychosis which messes up my metabolism and insulin so it’s harder for me with my fat loss and muscle building. I’m trying to get down too 75-85kg and maintain around there and build muscle to fill out my frame.

You use any JP products for intra workout?

Because you’re not eating to support recovery, which is essential for strength progress. It’s like trying to read a book while watching a movie. Do one or the other, otherwise you’re justing distracting from success in both.

This 4-week plan is a great place to start: Complexes for Fat Loss - T NATION
Assess where you are after that and adjust the plan as needed.

Or if you have the discipline to stick to one plan for several months at a time without changing, I’m sure there are 5/3/1 templates that crank up the conditioning and don’t push the main lifts as hard. But 5/3/1 works better the longer you follow it. If you’re going to switch to something else after a month or two, you’re sabotaging the big picture plan.

Cutting calories will definitely help you lose “weight”, but we care about losing fat and preserving muscle. That’s a different ballgame.

That’s a pretty big goal, but absolutely doable with persistence and a decent plan. Again, lining up your training and nutrition to attack it full-on will be better than eating for one goal while training for a different goal.

Starting a training log that lays out your actual training and nutrition plan, and tracks what you’re doing as you go, would be a really good idea.

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Nope. I’ve used Biotest (here) and can vouch for it.

@Chris_Colucci is laying out better advice though. The intra really only started to matter when I’d been dieting for weeks/ months, calories were low, and my bodyfat was getting pretty low. @T3hPwnisher and @kleinhound are examples of dudes that are frequently that lean, don’t get the gross rebounds I do, and don’t mess with any of that stuff. They just hit the basics very hard. Multiple ways to microwave a cat and all that.

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Because you’re not eating to support recovery, which is essential for strength progress. It’s like trying to read a book while watching a movie. Do one or the other, otherwise you’re justing distracting from success in both.
Is it possible to build strength while trying to lose fat? Like body recomp??

This 4-week plan is a great place to start: Complexes for Fat Loss - T NATION
Assess where you are after that and adjust the plan as needed.
I looked at that and it’s not my thing, too many Weightlifter exercises, I’m after Powerlifting compound movements. I could just do cardio two times a week on my rest days from the gym?
Or if you have the discipline to stick to one plan for several months at a time without changing, I’m sure there are 5/3/1 templates that crank up the conditioning and don’t push the main lifts as hard. But 5/3/1 works better the longer you follow it. If you’re going to switch to something else after a month or two, you’re sabotaging the big picture plan.

Cutting calories will definitely help you lose “weight”, but we care about losing fat and preserving muscle. That’s a different ballgame.
I’m trying to lose fat, not just weight in general.

That’s a pretty big goal, but absolutely doable with persistence and a decent plan. Again, lining up your training and nutrition to attack it full-on will be better than eating for one goal while training for a different goal.
Before I was put on meds I was around 75kg, after taking meds I’m now 106.5kg. So if I came from that weight I should be able to get back to it?
Starting a training log that lays out your actual training and nutrition plan, and tracks what you’re doing as you go, would be a really good idea.
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I already take note of what I eat and train.

Sorry, I don’t know how to quote replies.

Yup. I’ve experimented with carbs pre workout, post workout, during workout, etc, and all I observed was that having them pre-workout caused energy crashes midway through workouts…and that’s it. The other two didn’t matter.

I’ll use carbs at a strongman competition, where I have 90 seconds to put out max effort, but for training they don’t play a role.

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You don’t need any glucose drinks.

Are you just looking for permission and trying to rationalize a sweet sugary drink here?

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