T Nation

Getting Old - Wisdom Request


#1

Im going to try to keep this short and sweet..

Is there anything I should know before I get any older? What the hell is it like?

The older regulars at my gym have been giving seemingly good advice, besides the usual like "take care of your joints", and "Invest for retirement early".

I've been getting headaches before it rains and gets cold, which never happened before. I brought it up and someone said "Welcome to getting old, kid."

Anything else I should know or prepare for? Any sagely advice is always appreciated.


#2

Well, the crucial thing to remember is that it beats the alternative, even if some days it doesn't seem like it. Plus, you're now allowed to ignore your hawt abz and focus on just being stronger if you like.


#3

Mobility work and GPP, do them

If you don't already start taking fish oil.


#4

How old are you now?

Nothing screws up long term progression like an injury (typically back or shoulder). Train hard but don't let your ego get in the way of smart training.


#5

"If you don't do it this year, you will be one year older when you do."

--Warren Miller


#6

I'm 25.

Ive always trained through soreness.. sometimes really deep soreness. The kind you get that wakes you up when you sleep the wrong way. Not really sure if thats injury, but I think Hell, im not that old, I can suck it up and deal with it later.. Maybe not a good idea.


#7

At 25 you're probably just going through puberty. You shouldn't even be allowed access to the "Over 35 Lifter".

The headaches before it rains and is cold is caused by living in New Jersey. Move to Arizona and it won't happen as much.

TNT


#8

I guess the Sergeant-at-Arms isn't doing his/her job very well if these toddlers are making it in the door :wink:


#9

LMAO..........

25 huh? That's exactly the age when I was beating the hell out of myself the most and enjoying every moment of it. Yea maybe some of us are paying for our youth in our 40's and 50's or so, but I wouldn't change a thing.
The pain you feel from plain ole soreness is different than the nagging pain of an injury. Won't take ya long to recognize the difference if you've been injured, has been my experience. I would hurt for a week sometimes after some of the shit we used to do. I started to really feel the effects, or what I thought were the pain and soreness of years of working hard and playing harder, was about 40.
Keep the GPP in your routine that's pretty important I've learned, and trying hard to correct now.


#10

Yeah. Where are the Mods when you need them. At 25 I was just growing up and starting to do crazy shit. When I hit 45 I slowed down a bit.

TNT


#11

Which is exactly why I posted here to ask the older folk, not the younger gen and their trolling and arbitrary flaming. I was hoping I wasn't going to get that here in the over 35 forum...

Anyway, Its NOT the crazy shit im worried about. Its the years down the road and 'No-body told me it was gonna be like this' scenario. I've read the responses as far as the training, and i'm going to take that advice. Injuries seem to be things that even though you get over, come back to bite your ass years later. Im curbing the reckless shit slightly so I can digest the burning of "right things to do", like wrapping, easing up on the supplements and not overtraining.

Is it true that shit gets more expensive as you get older? Im not one to run to the doctor for every fucking bump and bruise, but these older folks get VERY serious about doctor's orders when it comes to the gym. It seems the older you get the more meds get prescribed to you and no amount of training seems to offset these effects these older men are complaining about.

By the way, trash this thread if it doesn't belong here. I'm not looking to fuck up the forum with my presence for whatever reason.


#12

25? I have shoes that old, and they're coming back in style. Go get laid, it'll do wonders.

If you're concerned go see a doc. Your metabolism & testosterone will start to slow down in a couple years. What you eat will start to matter in how you look and feel.

I'm looking forward to the day when I can say what I want, whenever I want and nobody will bat an eye. I'm not, however, looking foward to the day that I start peeing on my shoes.


#13

I'm 47. I got here a day at a time. There wasn't a single one of those days that I said "oh, hell, today is the day that I turned 'old!' " It just gradually happens. I still lift heavy, train hard, and do my best to keep up with the 25-30 year old Special Operators I often train with. They're tough and don't cut me any slack.

I think most guys will agree the toughest muscle to train is the one between your ears. Not only training your mind to know that you're the toughest sumbitch in the gym, but also training your mind to know that you don't know everything and that you should be constantly learning. You'll learn from people not as knowledgeable as you, people younger, older, etc.

As far as the best way to age strongly? Form. Get your form dialed in. Learn when you're too fatigued to lift properly and call it a day. Nothing is more annoying than getting tired, hurting yourself, and losing a lot of hard-earned gains while your body heals.

It's also never too early to wean yourself off of junk food if its part of your diet. Sure, have a burger, burrito, and a day where you eat every damn thing you can cram into your mouth from time to time. Just ensure it's not a habit and don't let it become one.

Like JoeGood & daddyzombie say: GPP & FIsh Oil

In short, get your form dialed in, GPP, push yourself but don't be stupid about it, and get your nutrition right.

There aren't many better feelings than being strong when strength is required and chicks dig muscle and I'm just kinda rambling now.

I wish that 25 years ago I'd been smart enough to ask your question and smart enough to listen.

Best of luck to you and remember one thing:
Regret for what we've done can be tempered with time. Regret for what we did not do is inconsolable.
In other words, if there's something you really want to do get out there give it your ALL before it passes you by.


#14

Family obligations will interfere. Decide how important this pursuit is to you and RESERVE THAT TIME as much as possible. Significant others need to be on board or it will be a pain point in the relationship for as long as you do it.

Don't stop training and come back to it - always be doing something even if it's less than usual. I'm sorry I stopped for 15 years. Who knows where'd I'd be now?


#15

Don't fuck off your thirties. I gave my thirties away to a job I didn't really like and drank way too much booze. When you hit thirty, you'll blink twice, and then you'll be 40. Savor all the time you have and make the most of it.


#16

A heartfelt thank you. This is exactly what I was trying to understand.

It seems motivation is the largest part in a lot of ways.. Strange how it never fades with age either.

Fish Oil is on order, and I'll see if I cant build (or buy by some means) a sled for GPP.


#17

If you don't mind me asking, was it exactly what you wanted at that particular time? I mean the want to drink and work for the money.


#18

If you could go back and do Test replacement therapy, would you?


#19

not a chance, just playing the hand I was dealt


#20

I was always work hard, play hard, and I hit the ground running right out of school. But it doesn't take long working 60-90 hours a week in a high stress job, where its work till you are ready to drop, then off to happy hour to blow off steam, before that's all there is. The things you really like to do get kind of shoved to the side. I'm not saying I didn't enjoy myself, or that there weren't any parts of the job that were rewarding, because that's not true. And you obviously have to work hard and earn a living. But it's easy to lose sight of what's important, its easy to get too comfortable with where you are at, and its easy to get in a rut. I guess I don't have any great advice for you, other than to be vigilant about taking stock of where you are at and making sure that what you are doing is what you really want to be doing. And if its not, then change it. And DCA is right on the money--don't ever stop training.