T Nation

Getting Jacked in Outer Space

Astronauts are now able to squat/bench/dead lift on the space station!

http://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/diet.fitness/11/18/exercise.in.space/index.html

I wonder how long until Cosgrove and/or Tate will be requested up there to teach the best ways to train in outer space? lol

[quote]B rocK wrote:
Astronauts are now able to squat/bench/dead lift on the space station!

http://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/diet.fitness/11/18/exercise.in.space/index.html

I wonder how long until Cosgrove and/or Tate will be requested up there to teach the best ways to train in outer space? lol[/quote]

Nice, cool find. I’ll betcha I could rep 585 A2G squats in outer space… :smiley:

exercising 2 1/2h a day? no wonder he lost body mass!

still a good idea, i wonder why the nasa didnt think of this earlier

I always wondered why NASA didn’t throw a bowflex up there, Hell it’s not like gravity is needed for somethig like that right? I mean you can hit almost every movement on one and up to 450 lbs of resistance is more than anyone would need to maintain muscle for a few months.

V

[quote]Vegita wrote:
I always wondered why NASA didn’t throw a bowflex up there, Hell it’s not like gravity is needed for somethig like that right? I mean you can hit almost every movement on one and up to 450 lbs of resistance is more than anyone would need to maintain muscle for a few months.

V[/quote]

Why the hell would they use a $20 solution when they can invest millions of tax payers money into an overly complicated solution giving work to a team of 30 for 5 years development?

Reminds me of the story of when the US and Russia were first going up into space. The US spent millions developing a pen that worked in zero G conditions so that they could complete logs etc. The Russians just used a pencil.

[quote]Cockney Blue wrote:
Vegita wrote:

Reminds me of the story of when the US and Russia were first going up into space. The US spent millions developing a pen that worked in zero G conditions so that they could complete logs etc. The Russians just used a pencil.[/quote]

Yeah but space pens rule

Wow, a vaacum weight training station. Why use bands or springs, they require matter. Much more efficient to build a one and a half ton weight station with vaacum as resistance. Five pounds of ruber would’ve been to expensive, and too hard on the environment.

anyone else notice the guy in the article pic was a couple inches high on that squat :wink:

they are nasa, everything is overthought. i like the idea of a bowflex up there. but i’m sure there is SOME reason to it.

2.5hrs/day is a lot. hopefully they are eating more now…unless they are cutting. haha

yay! jacked space marines to fight off alien hordes. where do i sign up?

[quote]B rocK wrote:
they are nasa, everything is overthought. i like the idea of a bowflex up there. but i’m sure there is SOME reason to it.

2.5hrs/day is a lot. hopefully they are eating more now…unless they are cutting. haha[/quote]

Overthought is quite an understatement. There is nothing a vaacum resistence strenght training station does for you that a spring loaded one can’t. Different sources of resistence, still the same damn resistance.

Why they are working out for so long, I guess they need quite the bit of low intensity cardio in there to negate the effects of the lack of gravity the other 22 hours a day.

Last, does anyone know how to calculate your BMR in space? I thought I’d go on a bulk when I get there and want to pack enough food.

Bands and springs do not stress the muscle in the extreme positions in the same way as weights do. Some sort of constant resistance is needed through the whole range of motion in order to develop and probably to maintain muscle, joint and bone tissue.

For instance, at the bottom of a squat a band or a spring provide NO resistance at all.

That’s not to say that NASA needed to build a whole new type of weight training machine. Keiser probably could have made something similar much more cheaply.

In space no one can hear you scream. Or drop the weights.

Have it extended or flexed to an extent so that it will have a decent resistance both in the bottom and top of the, for example, squat. Should be able to make a device about the same size, without using parts from half a truck, with a force decrease in the bottom/top less than 10-20%.

I’d bet my own ass that’s good enough to keep them healthy. It’s not like they’re trying to be athletes or would have time to get major imbalances by working out to maintain, probably also when in a caloric deficit, for a couple of months.

Why not simply a bowflex?

[quote]SSC wrote:
B rocK wrote:
Astronauts are now able to squat/bench/dead lift on the space station!

http://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/diet.fitness/11/18/exercise.in.space/index.html

I wonder how long until Cosgrove and/or Tate will be requested up there to teach the best ways to train in outer space? lol

Nice, cool find. I’ll betcha I could rep 585 A2G squats in outer space… :D[/quote]

In outer space, it would not weigh 585 lbs. :slight_smile:

[quote]ty45 wrote:
SSC wrote:
B rocK wrote:
Astronauts are now able to squat/bench/dead lift on the space station!

http://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/diet.fitness/11/18/exercise.in.space/index.html

I wonder how long until Cosgrove and/or Tate will be requested up there to teach the best ways to train in outer space? lol

Nice, cool find. I’ll betcha I could rep 585 A2G squats in outer space… :smiley:

In outer space, it would not weigh 585 lbs. :)[/quote]

With this machine it would; it provides up to 600lbs resistance!

[quote]shoo wrote:

Why they are working out for so long, I guess they need quite the bit of low intensity cardio in there to negate the effects of the lack of gravity the other 22 hours a day.

[/quote]

I bet that

A.) it takes a while to set up, change weights
and/or
B.) they take long rests, use a log book, check their cell phone, talk to their friends, or stare at female astronauts using the anti-gravity treadmill.

[quote]Cockney Blue wrote:
Vegita wrote:
Reminds me of the story of when the US and Russia were first going up into space. The US spent millions developing a pen that worked in zero G conditions so that they could complete logs etc. The Russians just used a pencil.[/quote]

i love that storey but it isn’t true, both US and USSR used pencils at first but the shavings floated around in zero G and got into the electronics, so they BOTH had to develop alternatives.

[quote]skidmark wrote:
Bands and springs do not stress the muscle in the extreme positions in the same way as weights do. Some sort of constant resistance is needed through the whole range of motion in order to develop and probably to maintain muscle, joint and bone tissue.

For instance, at the bottom of a squat a band or a spring provide NO resistance at all.

That’s not to say that NASA needed to build a whole new type of weight training machine. Keiser probably could have made something similar much more cheaply.[/quote]

You have obviously never squated on a bowflex.

Also, when doing a barbell curl, due to the arc, the resistance is low at the start and finish of the excercise, and most intense when you are in the middle. If you curl with a bowflex, you can preload the rods a little and then the resistance is very consistant throughourt the range of motion during the lift. So there is pros and cons to both methods, except it wouldn’t cost 10 million dollars to use a bowflex. (not like it’s my money they are spending anyways right? Oh wait it is.)

V