T Nation

Getting 'Fat' to Get Shreeded


#1

Ok, So I have read some articles but still don't have the answer I'm looking for. I remember reading in an article once "If you want to be a shredded 200lbs you have to be at least a soft 220lbs."

And as I was reading Nate Green's article "Built for Show" (http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/built_for_show) I noticed the two pictures. One, from when he was 145 and one when he was 190.

Now, my question is: What is "soft", was there a point in between those 2 pictures where Nate was, I guess you could say chubby or fatter without as much muscel defintion?

Maybe a simpler way to ask my question is; Is there a way to gain a significant amount of weight while keeping your bodyfat low and maintaining that defined look.


#2

I don’t see this is in the beginner forum?


#3

[quote]JCUNN wrote:
Maybe a simpler way to ask my question is; Is there a way to gain a significant amount of weight while keeping your bodyfat low and maintaining that defined look.
[/quote]

Yes. But there’s always a catch.

Method 1: John Berardi’s G-Flux

  • perform 10-20 hrs of moderate-high intensity activity each week. Eat a bunch too. Think Michael Phelps.

Method 2: Steroids

  • We have an entire forum dedicated to this.

Method 3: Thib’s Carb Cycling Codex

  • heavy training days you eat a high amount of carbs. Moderate training days you eat a moderate amount of carbs. Low/no training days you eat low/no carbs.

Method 4: Anabolic Diet

  • Live off protein and fat during the weak, hit up carbs like a dope fiend over the weekend.

In all cases, your genetics will dictate how lean you can remain while gaining. All these methods do (even steroids) is bend the rules a little bit. You still have to be on point with your training and diet.

(G-Flux, anabolic diet, and carb cycling codex are articles. You can use the search feature to find them)


#4

Otep so you’re saying:

Heavy training day: regular protein intake, high carbs

Medium training day: regular protein intake, med carbs

Low training day: regular protein intake, low carbs

Off days: regular protein intake or more, low or no carbs

right?


#5

[quote]thekrown wrote:
Otep so you’re saying:

Heavy training day: regular protein intake, high carbs

Medium training day: regular protein intake, med carbs

Low training day: regular protein intake, low carbs

Off days: regular protein intake or more, low or no carbs

right?[/quote]

No.

I’m saying read the article.
Thibs Cycling Codex

Search feature in the upper right-hand corner.


#6

Maybe you could clarify some things in this article for me Otep. I read this article (http://www.T-Nation.com/readArticle.do?id=909183) The Gflux article.

“training multiple muscle qualities”, your workouts might include 3 weight training sessions per week, 3 high intensity interval sessions per week, and 3 low intensity aerobic sessions per week. Or you could do 2 max effort (heavy loading) sessions per week, 2 dynamic effort (speed lifting) sessions per week, and 3 GPP sessions per week

What type of excersises would be a part of each of these training sessions? Would your max effort sessions be you doing your one rep max with each lift?

Also, it seems that if you want to do the Gflux “program” you need a lot of time to dedicate to activity (at least 10hrs) How would you suggest I use these ten hours?


#7

Maybe you could clarify some things in this article for me Otep. I read this article (http://www.T-Nation.com/readArticle.do?id=909183) The Gflux article.

“training multiple muscle qualities”, your workouts might include 3 weight training sessions per week, 3 high intensity interval sessions per week, and 3 low intensity aerobic sessions per week. Or you could do 2 max effort (heavy loading) sessions per week, 2 dynamic effort (speed lifting) sessions per week, and 3 GPP sessions per week

What type of excersises would be a part of each of these training sessions? Would your max effort sessions be you doing your one rep max with each lift?

Also, it seems that if you want to do the Gflux “program” you need a lot of time to dedicate to activity (at least 10hrs) How would you suggest I use these ten hours?


#8

[quote]JCUNN wrote:
Ok, So I have read some articles but still don’t have the answer I’m looking for. I remember reading in an article once “If you want to be a shredded 200lbs you have to be at least a soft 220lbs.”

And as I was reading Nate Green’s article “Built for Show” (http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/built_for_show) I noticed the two pictures. One, from when he was 145 and one when he was 190.

Now, my question is: What is “soft”, was there a point in between those 2 pictures where Nate was, I guess you could say chubby or fatter without as much muscel defintion?

Maybe a simpler way to ask my question is; Is there a way to gain a significant amount of weight while keeping your bodyfat low and maintaining that defined look.
[/quote]

From my brief experience, if you are a beginner I think you would be best off sticking to one single plan. Either you want to gain muscle mass (bulk) or drop body fat (cut). Focus on one or the other.

If you’re eating lots of good, clean food on a bulk, then you still might be able to drop some body fat along the way or at least minimize the amount you gain. Or, you can always follow Dave Tate’s advice:

They have their way, and I have mine,
but please remember, I walk the line.
They might have been the head of the class,
but they can kiss my JACKED up ass!

http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_forum/sports_body_training_performance_bodybuilding/some_motivation_from_dave_tate?id=2618294&pageNo=0


#9

JCUNN:

When I read Berardi’s articles on G-flux, I really got the sense that the G-flux way is quite simply to train like an elite athlete. And that means a lot of time, a lot of high intensity work, a lot of active recovery, a lot of food, and a lot of time expensed.

My understanding is that YES, you have to spend 10hrs/week minimum. Here’s an example of how this would work for someone doing Oly lifts:

Monday Goal: Clean and Jerk
Main
Clean and Jerk: 5x1 @ 95% 1RM
Snatch: 5x3 60% (technique work)
Accessory
Planks:5x 20sec x 50lbs
Jerk from Rack: 5x2x80%
Chinese Rows 3x5x85%
Military Press: 3x5x85%
Stretching
Total Time: 2 hours

Tuesday Goal: Sprint Speed
10 minute warmup
5 100m sprint
5 100m sprint up hill (15 degree incline)
5 100m spring up hill (30 degree incline)
30 min. jog at light pace
Stretching
Total Time: 2 hours

Wednesday Goal: Snatch
Main
Snatch: 5x1 @ 95% 1RM
Clean and Jerk: 5x3 60% (technique work)
Accessory
Snatch Pull: 5x3x 100%
Plank: 5x20secx50lbs
Chinese Row: 5x3x90%
Stretching
Total Time: 2 hours

Thursday Goal:Active Rest
Yoga. One hour

Friday Goal: Squat
main
Back Squat: 10x1x95%
accessory
Romanian Deadlift: 3x10x75%
Standing Calf Raises: 5x10x 75%
Snatch Pull: 5x3x100% (you can never have too much snatch pull)
Stretching
Total Time: two hours

Saturday Goal: Vertical Jump
10 minute jog and 100 jumping jacks
10x1 depth jumps off 1’box
10x1 depth jumps off 2’ box
5 long jumps
30 minute jog
Stretching
Total Time: one and a half hours.

Sunday Goal: Active Rest
Chikung. One hour, twelve positions, held five minute each.

Total weekly time: eleven and half hours.
Average intensity: Ungodly
Amount of active recovery: probably not enough.

The important part is to have a specific plan each day. You’re active 1-2 hours every day, and you’re training a specific athletic quality, be it speed, strength, isometric strength, endurance, CNS recovery, whatever. So you’d fill your time with what would benefit you, and that would be different depending on what sport/endeavor you participate in.

Hope this helps. That was a lot of typing.