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Genetic Freak?

What exactly does it mean when people say something like “You won’t recover from that unless you’re a genetic freak.” I mean, really, what the hell does that mean? And if there really is a definitive answer, how can we make people closer to being a “freak?” Is it work capacity, recovery techniques, etc.?

[quote]AlexM wrote:
What exactly does it mean when people say something like “You won’t recover from that unless you’re a genetic freak.” I mean, really, what the hell does that mean? And if there really is a definitive answer, how can we make people closer to being a “freak?” Is it work capacity, recovery techniques, etc.? [/quote]

How can we make people closer to being a GENETIC freak?

Are you seriously asking that question?

Ok, to become a genetic freak, go back in time, take cells from all the strongest people, leanest, biggest, etc., people on earth, unraval their DNA, take the genes you need, unraval your own DNA, put their DNA into yours, and put the DNA back into your cell.

Seriously.

As far as i know, A Genetic freak is someone who has really good genetics for whatever they are interested in. You cant change that.

[quote]Hanley wrote:
AlexM wrote:
What exactly does it mean when people say something like “You won’t recover from that unless you’re a genetic freak.” I mean, really, what the hell does that mean? And if there really is a definitive answer, how can we make people closer to being a “freak?” Is it work capacity, recovery techniques, etc.?

How can we make people closer to being a GENETIC freak?

Are you seriously asking that question?[/quote]

No, I’m not asking that. I guess I worded the original post wrong.

What I’m asking is what is that people are really referring to when they say that it’s too much work, it’s too much intensity etc. to recover from, “UNLESS YOUR ARE A GENETIC FREAK.” I.E. Matt Kroc lifts the way he does because he is a FREAK. Randy Moss can run maximal sprints all day long, every day and never slow down or overtrain because he is a FREAK.

What are they actually referring to when they say freak? That’s my question. And if your answer is their recovery ability, then what things go into that and then, what can be done for the average trainee to become more of a freak?

[quote]AlexM wrote:
Hanley wrote:
AlexM wrote:
What exactly does it mean when people say something like “You won’t recover from that unless you’re a genetic freak.” I mean, really, what the hell does that mean? And if there really is a definitive answer, how can we make people closer to being a “freak?” Is it work capacity, recovery techniques, etc.?

How can we make people closer to being a GENETIC freak?

Are you seriously asking that question?

No, I’m not asking that. I guess I worded the original post wrong.

What I’m asking is what is that people are really referring to when they say that it’s too much work, it’s too much intensity etc. to recover from, “UNLESS YOUR ARE A GENETIC FREAK.” I.E. Matt Kroc lifts the way he does because he is a FREAK. Randy Moss can run maximal sprints all day long, every day and never slow down or overtrain because he is a FREAK.

What are they actually referring to when they say freak? That’s my question. And if your answer is their recovery ability, then what things go into that and then, what can be done for the average trainee to become more of a freak?
[/quote]

I think they mean that the person’s genetics are above average, allowing them to be able to recover from those things faster.

Or just that they are at such a level, that it puts them into another category.

i.e. god/freak/monster/beast, etc

[quote]blazindave wrote:
Or just that they are at such a level, that it puts them into another category.

i.e. god/freak/monster/beast, etc[/quote]

I that is how most people mean it when they say it. Very few people are so genetically superior that their ability to recover is incapable of being reached through serious training.

[quote]Congera wrote:
blazindave wrote:
Or just that they are at such a level, that it puts them into another category.

i.e. god/freak/monster/beast, etc

I that is how most people mean it when they say it. Very few people are so genetically superior that their ability to recover is incapable of being reached through serious training.[/quote]

Think really hard. How many people do you know?
Now how many of those people actually train seriously?
Alot of people are clueless on how to train. Alot of us still are.

[quote]blazindave wrote:
Congera wrote:
blazindave wrote:
Or just that they are at such a level, that it puts them into another category.

i.e. god/freak/monster/beast, etc

I that is how most people mean it when they say it. Very few people are so genetically superior that their ability to recover is incapable of being reached through serious training.

Think really hard. How many people do you know?
Now how many of those people actually train seriously?
Alot of people are clueless on how to train. Alot of us still are.[/quote]

I’m confused… that is kind of the point I was trying to make.

Very little cannot be made up for through solid serious training

Your body adapts to how often you train, the more often you can lift and recover the more progress you can make in a short ammount of time.

The more often you train the faster you recover, if you train legs once a week your legs will probably be sore for 3-4 days after you squat. If you squat 3 times a week your legs will probably never get sore.

This is the idea behind GPP training, speeds up recovery, and gets your body used to recovering faster.

[quote]AlexM wrote:
What exactly does it mean when people say something like “You won’t recover from that unless you’re a genetic freak.” I mean, really, what the hell does that mean? [/quote]

Calling someone a genetic freak is nothing more than making up excuses as to why you will never be at their level.

[quote]fish_burps wrote:
AlexM wrote:
What exactly does it mean when people say something like “You won’t recover from that unless you’re a genetic freak.” I mean, really, what the hell does that mean?

Calling someone a genetic freak is nothing more than making up excuses as to why you will never be at their level. [/quote]

i like that

[quote]Congera wrote:
fish_burps wrote:
AlexM wrote:
What exactly does it mean when people say something like “You won’t recover from that unless you’re a genetic freak.” I mean, really, what the hell does that mean?

Calling someone a genetic freak is nothing more than making up excuses as to why you will never be at their level.

i like that[/quote]

x2

[quote]ahzaz wrote:
Congera wrote:
fish_burps wrote:
AlexM wrote:
What exactly does it mean when people say something like “You won’t recover from that unless you’re a genetic freak.” I mean, really, what the hell does that mean?

Calling someone a genetic freak is nothing more than making up excuses as to why you will never be at their level.

i like that

x2[/quote]

x3

I’m gonna have to say that to someone some day.

[quote]fish_burps wrote:
AlexM wrote:
What exactly does it mean when people say something like “You won’t recover from that unless you’re a genetic freak.” I mean, really, what the hell does that mean?

Calling someone a genetic freak is nothing more than making up excuses as to why you will never be at their level. [/quote]

While I agree with that sentiment, you clearly misunderstood where I was coming from. I could care less about excuses or how other people recover. I originally asked the question because I wanted to better understand why I am able to recover from things a lot easier than what seems to be the norm.

That being said, the only explanation that’s been said is that genetically, some people recover better. I wanted to know more about it, maybe to see if someone could provide some insight on a biological level. It’s possible that it’s just another one of those things that very little is currently known about.

example of genetic freak:
A basketball team here in sweden was doing it’s first weightlifting session of the season. The coach has been training for 15+ years, and is super anal about his diet etc.

He shows the team how too squat like a “real man” and does a squat with 150 kgs, wich is around his PB. The rookie on the team weighing about 78kgs does a double with 150kg first time squating. He is a monster. I laughed so hard when I saw that. Remember these where basketball players not powerlifters so it made me smile :slight_smile:

[quote]wiiwii wrote:
example of genetic freak:
A basketball team here in sweden was doing it’s first weightlifting session of the season. The coach has been training for 15+ years, and is super anal about his diet etc.

He shows the team how too squat like a “real man” and does a squat with 150 kgs, wich is around his PB. The rookie on the team weighing about 78kgs does a double with 150kg first time squating. He is a monster. I laughed so hard when I saw that. Remember these where basketball players not powerlifters so it made me smile :)[/quote]

That’s probably the best definition that has been offered of a freak - someone who is just preternaturally good at any given activity and not because he’s practiced it

[quote] Mega Newb wrote: Your body adapts to how often you train, the more often you can lift and recover the more progress you can make in a short ammount of time.

The more often you train the faster you recover, if you train legs once a week your legs will probably be sore for 3-4 days after you squat. If you squat 3 times a week your legs will probably never get sore.

This is the idea behind GPP training, speeds up recovery, and gets your body used to recovering faster. [/quote]

Newb, I may be misunderstanding your point, but even tho it would be possible to adapt to squatting 3x a week - indeed, since many OLers do just that - I’m not sure that it’s really optimal for maximum strength. If you squat every day you’ll get very good at squatting every day, but I dont know that your max strength will be as good as if you squatted once or twice a week.

There was a very interesting debate about this on Wanna Be Big - too bad i cant find it, although I’m not sure i’d even be allowed to link there. one thing that nobody mentioned that frustrated me is that an OL squat will be less CNS intensive, and therefore perhaps more conducive to a higher frequency. those are just some thoguhts off the top of my head

[quote]KBCThird wrote:
wiiwii wrote:
example of genetic freak:
A basketball team here in sweden was doing it’s first weightlifting session of the season. The coach has been training for 15+ years, and is super anal about his diet etc.

He shows the team how too squat like a “real man” and does a squat with 150 kgs, wich is around his PB. The rookie on the team weighing about 78kgs does a double with 150kg first time squating. He is a monster. I laughed so hard when I saw that. Remember these where basketball players not powerlifters so it made me smile :slight_smile:

That’s probably the best definition that has been offered of a freak - someone who is just preternaturally good at any given activity and not because he’s practiced it

Mega Newb wrote: Your body adapts to how often you train, the more often you can lift and recover the more progress you can make in a short ammount of time.

The more often you train the faster you recover, if you train legs once a week your legs will probably be sore for 3-4 days after you squat. If you squat 3 times a week your legs will probably never get sore.

This is the idea behind GPP training, speeds up recovery, and gets your body used to recovering faster.

Newb, I may be misunderstanding your point, but even tho it would be possible to adapt to squatting 3x a week - indeed, since many OLers do just that - I’m not sure that it’s really optimal for maximum strength.

If you squat every day you’ll get very good at squatting every day, but I dont know that your max strength will be as good as if you squatted once or twice a week. There was a very interesting debate about this on Wanna Be Big - too bad i cant find it, although I’m not sure i’d even be allowed to link there.

one thing that nobody mentioned that frustrated me is that an OL squat will be less CNS intensive, and therefore perhaps more conducive to a higher frequency. those are just some thoguhts off the top of my head

[/quote]

Squating 3x a week is not optimal for strength, but being able to recover from squating 3 times a week while only squating 1-2 times a week is optimal. Which is why GPP training is important.

I squat heavy every 3 days and make gains, but im apparently not normal, lol. So I cant speak for everyone.

But everyone could benefit from gpp training I would say, everyone could benefit from gpp work, or squating more often or training what ever more often.

the faster you recover the faster you can make gains, so it makes sense. I wish I knew enough to make a thread telling people how to train, but I dont.

By the way, wannabebig.com rules, tons of elite powerlifters posting there. Bad ass site!

[quote]fish_burps wrote:
AlexM wrote:
What exactly does it mean when people say something like “You won’t recover from that unless you’re a genetic freak.” I mean, really, what the hell does that mean?

Calling someone a genetic freak is nothing more than making up excuses as to why you will never be at their level. [/quote]

So anyone can pull 680@132 if they work hard enough? 1000lbs bench? Weigh in at a lean 300lbs? I’m all for working as hard as possible, but saying that everybody is equal is some hippy feel-good nonsense. People are different.

[quote]johnnytang24 wrote:
So anyone can pull 680@132 if they work hard enough? 1000lbs bench? Weigh in at a lean 300lbs? I’m all for working as hard as possible, but saying that everybody is equal is some hippy feel-good nonsense. People are different. [/quote]

You clearly mis-understood my post.

First of all, body weight stuff is stupid. I doubt I’d pull 315 if I weighed 132. So leave body weight arguments out of it.

No, not everybody is equal. For example, some people are extremely gifted when it comes to strength. I’ve heard that Andy Bolton pulled 600 the first time he ever deadlifted. There’s nothing normal about that.

But at the same time, most people do not sincerely believe that they are capable of something incredible. And regardless of their ability or lack thereof, that belief is the #1 reason why they will never achieve anything incredible.

Since Matt Kroczaleski was mentioned earlier in this thread, I’ll use him as an example. I believe somewhere he said that his genes predisposed him to be a good distance runner. But now, thanks to more hard work and dedication than any sane person could imagine, he’s one of the top 220s/242s in the world.

My point is that if you’re serious about being the best then you should never put ANYONE on a pedestal you can never reach. And that’s exactly what you’re doing when you call someone a genetic freak, you’re saying that because this person’s genes are better than yours you can never hope to be at their level.

If you want to be the best then your mindset needs to be: I don’t care if you’re more gifted than me, I will find a way to beat you.