T Nation

Gas Grills

I live between the Lincoln National Forrest and the Apache Reservation up in the moutains of New Mexico.

This is normally great, but, due to lack of water, we are under severe fire restrition. Lots of dry pine and pinion ready to go up like a candlestick.

This is a complete burn-ban. No outside fires of any kind. No smoking outside. No smoking driving your car with open windows. NO CHARCOL GRILLS. Not even on your deck. Nothing.

Now, I’ve never not cooked with a charcol grill or fire. I pretty much live off of what I could cook in my Green Egg, so I am in jam.

Gas grills are permitted. Does anyone have any recommendations in this regard?

That sucks you can’t use your Green Egg. I used gas grills before I received my Egg and it is a night and day difference. I never noticed a difference between any of the gas grills I previously owned regardless of brand but then I never spent $500 on one.

How long-term does this look like it’ll be? Do you get these burn-bans on the regular or is it fairly rare?

If it’s a common occurrence and/or is expected to be a long, drawn out situation, I’d invest in a quality, alternate, “drought-compliant” grill.

If it’s rare or not very long term and what you want is something to tide you over, just get a cheap, gas or electric grill. Maybe even one of those portable ones that you can fold down, throw into the car trunk and take to a picnic (ie: Weber Q).

TTR, I have two grills, a Weber Charocal grill and a Weber Gas grill. On weekends or steaks, always charcoal. In the winter with ice and snow on the patio or when the wife is cooking, gas. You’ll pay a little more for the Weber gas but it’s worth it. The problem with cheaper gas grills is they don’t burn evenly.

[quote]cwill1973 wrote:
That sucks you can’t use your Green Egg. I used gas grills before I received my Egg and it is a night and day difference. I never noticed a difference between any of the gas grills I previously owned regardless of brand but then I never spent $500 on one.[/quote]

Allegedly, some of the better ones get hotter where you can sear meat like a wood/charcoal grill.

I do want electric start. If I have to use gas, it better be easy.

[quote]postholedigger wrote:
How long-term does this look like it’ll be? Do you get these burn-bans on the regular or is it fairly rare?
[/quote]

Well, Smokey the Bear was recued here and is buried at the ranger station I can see down in the valley, if that means something to you.

Probably going to go expensive. I’d love something that has a little smoker box or something so I can get a little of the wood effect.

[quote]BCFlynn wrote:
TTR, I have two grills, a Weber Charocal grill and a Weber Gas grill. On weekends or steaks, always charcoal. In the winter with ice and snow on the patio or when the wife is cooking, gas. You’ll pay a little more for the Weber gas but it’s worth it. The problem with cheaper gas grills is they don’t burn evenly. [/quote]

Any particular model or style of Weber gas you recommend?

Depends on the size, if all you need is a smaller go with the Spirit, it’s not huge, it’s a two burner and will get the job done. Its about $300-$400. Push button start, uses propane. When I cook chicken or pork on gas during the weekday, I heat the grill up as hot as it can get. Then, I turn one of the burners off. Put the chicken or pork on the space where the burner is turned off and indirectly cook it. 15 minutes on one side, flip it over 20 on the other.

You can buy hickory and mesquite chunks at Wal-Mart. There are directions on the back of the bag how to smoke meat on a gas grill. My guess is after you soak it, put the wood over the part that’s flaming and that will deliver it.

[quote]BCFlynn wrote:
Depends on the size, if all you need is a smaller go with the Spirit, it’s not huge, it’s a two burner and will get the job done. Its about $300-$400. Push button start, uses propane. When I cook chicken or pork on gas during the weekday, I heat the grill up as hot as it can get. Then, I turn one of the burners off. Put the chicken or pork on the space where the burner is turned off and indirectly cook it. 15 minutes on one side, flip it over 20 on the other.

You can buy hickory and mesquite chunks at Wal-Mart. There are directions on the back of the bag how to smoke meat on a gas grill. My guess is after you soak it, put the wood over the part that’s flaming and that will deliver it. [/quote]

I’m leaning toward the Webber Genesis (from Sears because we have a Sears in Ruidosso).

http://www.sears.com/weber-genesis-3-burner-lp-gas-grill-copper/p-07116934000P?prdNo=1&blockNo=1&blockType=G1#reviewsWrap

We have a Weber Genesis. Excellent.

Great call, you won’t do better than that!

Charcoal > Gas

George foreman.

/thread.

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[quote]Edgy wrote:
Charcoal > Gas[/quote]

Really?

[quote]theBird wrote:
George foreman.

/thread.

tweet[/quote]

[quote]thethirdruffian wrote:

[quote]Edgy wrote:
Charcoal > Gas[/quote]

Really?[/quote]

…Not according to Hank Hill…

first thing to do with a new gas grill is cook up a pound of bacon …before you cook anything else .

the next day , throw another pound on for good measure .

“Taste the meat, not the heat”

Bacon cooked on charcoal is god’s gift to mankind.

[quote]Aggv wrote:
Bacon cooked on charcoal is god’s gift to mankind. [/quote]

damn straight .

but what the bacon does to a shiny new gas grill is next to magic .