T Nation

Fullbody VS Split


#1

I'm training to get stronger and bigger and more athletic for basketball.

I am currently doing this fullbody split 3 times a week:

Bench press- 5 sets of 8
Dumbell curls- 5 sets of 8
Dips- 3 sets to failure
Rows- 3 sets of 8
Sqaut- 5 sets of 8
Deadlift- 5 sets of 8-10
Lunges- 3 sets of 10
calf raises- 3 sets of 15

Should I do that or this?

upperbody days:
Bench press- 5 sets of 8
Dumbell curls- 5 sets of 8
tricep pulldown machine or dips- 5 sets of 8
Rows- 5 sets of 8

Lowerbody days:
Sqaut- 5 sets of 8
Deadlift or glute ham raises- 5 sets of 8-10
Lunges- 5 sets of 10
calf raises- 5 sets of 15

I will do 3 lower body days per week and 3 upperbody days per week.

Should I do the fullbody split or the upper and lower split?


#2

this should be a whole new topic. some people live by split training, but i think this will become more of a thing of the past. I believe when it comes to training, a goal should be set, ie. new max in lifts, higher verticle, gain weight, etc. And you should accomodate your weight training to what you want your end results to be. Do you want size? Strength? Explosiveness? Power?


#3

If you look at some of the good full-body programs the trainers have put up here, you'll hopefully recognize that there is a 3rd option.

Check out Chad Waterbury's "The Waterbury Method" and you'll see that instead of endlessly repeating the same full-body workout (the way you've described what you are doing), he has multiple, different full-body routines during the week.

There is, of course, endless variation to be had in all of this-- you can make full-body workouts different by incorporating push-pull stuff, flipping around your loading parameters, etc.

Does this help at all?


#4

Go into the Christian Thibadeau articles. Check the one called renasaince bodybuilding or something like that.

Simple sort of program and is designed to make you a more complete athlete.

I think your exercise order was lacking. Curls should not be a second exercise on a full body workout.

Start on the big muscle groups and work down to the smaller ones.


#5

Yea, nix the curls. Also rep numbers are probably a bit high for a basketball player. You should probably be developing leaping power and explosiveness and sets of 8 aren't optimal for that. Cosgrove talks about in one of his articles if size is a concern also that he'll have his clients do like 3 sets of 3 or whatever for power/strength then he'll have the finish by doing one set of 8-12 of that exercise to hit other muscle fibers, if that is a concern. Also beware of that volume. If you are playing often, which you should be, doing all that lifting three days/week might be a bit much.


#6

Yea, nix the curls. Also rep numbers are probably a bit high for a basketball player. You should probably be developing leaping power and explosiveness and sets of 8 aren't optimal for that. Cosgrove talks about in one of his articles if size is a concern also that he'll have his clients do like 3 sets of 3 or whatever for power/strength then he'll have the finish by doing one set of 8-12 of that exercise to hit other muscle fibers, if that is a concern. Also beware of that volume. If you are playing often, which you should be, doing all that lifting three days/week might be a bit much.


#7

run a search on joe kenn's tier system, I think that will fit your needs.


#8

Would doing 3 upper body and 3 lower body workouts per week be overtraining?

I like the fullbody split I posted. But it takes close to 95 minutes. Is 95 minutes too much?


#9

Are you getting results...?


#10

Doesn't seem like you understand overtraining.

Overtraining is not something that people on an internet forum can determine from the little bit of information you posted.

It's a state YOU put yourself in, and everyone is different in terms of what it takes to overtrain them. The quality of your diet and the volume of your rest will play a big role, in addition to the type of training you are doing. Your other activities (your basketball workouts, for ex.) will affect your ability to recover from your weight training. This is what can lead to overtraining in some folks.

Some people can handle lots of volume without overtraining, some people can handle lots of intensity, but fewer people can take considerable volume AND intensity without overtraining.


#11

I would go between programs on a 6-8 weekly basis. Get the best of both worlds. Depending on your training as well. In season, full body twice a week. Off season go to a split 4 -5times a week.

This is a better exercise order for your current routine. There are less sets as well and IMO is STILL a very long routine. 12 sets would be more ideal.

Deadlift- 3 sets of 8-10
Bench press- 3 sets of 8
Dips- 2 sets to failure
Lunges- 2 sets of 10
Rows- 3 sets of 8
Dumbell curls- 2 sets of 8
Sqaut- 3 sets of 8 supersetted w/
calf raises- 2 sets of 15


#12

I'm not trying to argue with you. I just want to know.

What was wrong with the amount of sets I had originally?


#13

It's a lot of sets. Especially for a full body program, which are extremely fatiguing.

You won't know until you try, but reducing your number of sets may see you progressing a lot faster. Not too mention will get you out of the gym quicker too.


#14

If your intent on doing that kind of volume, I would do it as a split. Otherwise, when you increase the frequency of your training by training total body, you can cut back on the volume each day.


#15

What part of the season are you in? IE off season, pre season or in season to put it simply.

How old are you? That Baller1950 isn't your DOB is it?

What position do you play?

How many times per week do you have team practice?

Those sorts of things have a big impact on the type of program that woudld suit you.


#16

Some fullbody workouts you may wanna check out are TBT by Chad Waterbury, The Holiday Program by Alwyn Cosgrove and Customized Volume Training by Mike Mahler


#17

Right now I am in the off-season but I will still be playing basketball atleast 15-18 hours a week.

I am 15 and a half years old.

I play point guard and shooting guard.


#18

The off season is your time to make up for what you are lacking in simple terms.

If you look at your game as a total pakage and you think that your athleticism is lacking, perhaps you need to put more time into that.

If you can't leave the skills side of basketball alone perhaps buy a book like NBA Power Conditioning. It mixes skill with plyometrics and etc.

You are putting in some serious hours which will make size gains slower than usual.

Point and Shooting guard don't have to be huge either. If you were a power forward or center, it would be another story.