T Nation

Full Day of Arms?

I saw some video of a very large guy,
talking about his various arm programs over the years, he said one of the most effective things he did during his early 20’s was to stay in the gym all day lifting - sleeping - eating he said he gained noticeable size on his arms each time. He admitted that most people would frown upon this idea today, but that for him it worked.

My question is: Is this type of a workout even possible? Would you actually gain anything or is it simply overtraining? If you could dedicate a whole day once every two or three weeks would this be a valid method of training?

Here ya’ go…

http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=459954

No. Try doing a day dedicated to Pulling/Pushing, no curling. That should work for your bi’s and tri’s among other things…

not everythig makes sence if you try new things you get new results try it try what ever you want shit you might find what works the best for you.

It’s stupid to spend an entire day at the gym just doing 1-2 bodyparts. There’s a limit to how much stimulation a muscle can receive in one day before it becomes wasted effort.

On the other hand you can probably have a maximum of 3 MEDIUM arm workouts spaced out in one day if you eat crazy amounts of carbs(with protein) and get some sleep in-between. But why would you want to mutilate your schedule like that?

[quote]powersavant wrote:
Here ya’ go…

http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=459954[/quote]

Someone has a good memory! Thanks.

Wow that workout looks like HELL.
I would be using the platemates by the end of the day.

[quote]detazathoth wrote:
No. Try doing a day dedicated to Pulling/Pushing, no curling. That should work for your bi’s and tri’s among other things…[/quote]

I personally don’t think recommending no direct arm work is a smart thing to do. If you don’t work a bodypart directly, you just won’t get full development. Period.
That’s like saying you should get all your calf work from doing squats. If you don’t directly stimulate a muscle, you won’t get maximum development.
I fell into this idea with shoulder training, now my delts are nonexistent with traps, then bone sticking out, then down to my arms. I regret not doing direct work, you might too.
Now i do have close grip chins and Weighted Dips as my main mass builders for arms but i have curls and extensions in there as well.

[quote]That One Guy wrote:
detazathoth wrote:
No. Try doing a day dedicated to Pulling/Pushing, no curling. That should work for your bi’s and tri’s among other things…

I personally don’t think recommending no direct arm work is a smart thing to do. If you don’t work a bodypart directly, you just won’t get full development. Period.
That’s like saying you should get all your calf work from doing squats. If you don’t directly stimulate a muscle, you won’t get maximum development.
I fell into this idea with shoulder training, now my delts are nonexistent with traps, then bone sticking out, then down to my arms. I regret not doing direct work, you might too.
Now i do have close grip chins and Weighted Dips as my main mass builders for arms but i have curls and extensions in there as well.[/quote]

Good post. I was hoping that “avoid all isolation work” mentality was dying off but apparently there are some who still think that makes sense.

Everything in bodybuilding that works for some people does not adhere to the supposed “training laws” that are touted by personal trainers. Do you know when my arms grew the fastest in the shortest amount of time? When I was training them 3 days a week as a beginner in college. Even when I did other body parts as my main focus that day, I would jump and do a few sets of curls, mostly for no other reason than I wanted to leave the gym with a pump in my arms because I had to pass the girls’ dorms. Was that the smartest way to approach training? No. Did it work? Yes.

There were several months where me and two other guys who I used to train with would do pull ups as the first thing we did when we got to the gym. It was like our “warm up” before we did anything else. Did I overtrain my back? No. It grew bigger and stronger and to this day I am glad I spent that time doing that.

Bottom line, there are things that are not conventional that DO work for some people. That doesn’t mean it is the best way for all or even most people to train. However, to ignore that it can work for some people is absolutely ridiculous. Biology adapts. It always has and always will as long as this planet supports life.

[quote]powersavant wrote:
Here ya’ go…

http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=459954
[/quote]

what a blast from the past.

"We live in a world of “instants… 56.6 modems, and 300-megahertz microprocessors.” - lol!

[quote]Professor X wrote:

There were several months where me and two other guys who I used to train with would do pull ups as the first thing we did when we got to the gym. It was like our “warm up” before we did anything else. Did I overtrain my back? No. It grew bigger and stronger and to this day I am glad I spent that time doing that.
[/quote]
Would you mind sharing some details? It strikes me as something I’d like to try.

[quote]wfifer wrote:
Professor X wrote:

There were several months where me and two other guys who I used to train with would do pull ups as the first thing we did when we got to the gym. It was like our “warm up” before we did anything else. Did I overtrain my back? No. It grew bigger and stronger and to this day I am glad I spent that time doing that.

Would you mind sharing some details? It strikes me as something I’d like to try. [/quote]

We were all just naturally competitive. What drove us in the gym was that we didn’t want to let the others get too far ahead. I wanted do 3 sets of 12 reps because they could do 3 sets of 12 reps. Every workout was pretty much based on our desire to outdo the other two guys. Training with them is how I benched 405lbs the first time. Had I not surrounded myself with people who believed they could do it, I would have doubted I could myself…which would have meant I never would have done it. The only reason anyone ever gets that strong is by believing they can in the first place.

Regardless of what we trained that day, we would start each session by doing pull ups. Some of it was because we looked good doing it and we liked the attention people gave all three of us. On average it was about 3 sets of as many reps as we could do…which for me was around 12 at a time.

Another thing that worked for me while training with them was static contractions at the end of the last set on shrugs. I truly believe that is why my traps stand out like they do now. We would do 3 sets ranging from 4-10 reps (usually 4 on the last set). We would then add an extra 45 on each side (which we couldn’t do reps with at the time) and hold that for one contraction for as long as possible trying to pass 30 seconds. It worked. Now I have no neck.

It’s amazing how much different it is when you’re competing against your training partners…hell, whenever there’s some respectably large dude or cardio bunny nearby I always manage to find a few extra reps.

I’ll definitely give your warm-up routine a shot this summer when I have some lifting buddies again (and I resume bulking). And thanks for the extra tip about shrugs. I love asking questions and getting extra information.

[quote]wfifer wrote:
It’s amazing how much different it is when you’re competing against your training partners…[/quote]

This is one thing I have never ever had, but wish I would have, at least for some of the time.

I don’t think a full day of isolation makes much sense. A full day of squats or other compound exercise may be something to consider(if you really want to).

It would be over training for almost everyone. You 'd need to work up to it, like adding an hour each time or something.

[quote]Andrew Dixon wrote:
I don’t think a full day of isolation makes much sense. A full day of squats or other compound exercise may be something to consider(if you really want to).

It would be over training for almost everyone. You 'd need to work up to it, like adding an hour each time or something.[/quote]

I have never done the One Day Arm Cure but I’ve read it’s quite stressful, trying to do something like that in a squat or similar movement would probably leave most people dead, literally.

[quote]scottiscool wrote:
Andrew Dixon wrote:
I don’t think a full day of isolation makes much sense. A full day of squats or other compound exercise may be something to consider(if you really want to).

It would be over training for almost everyone. You 'd need to work up to it, like adding an hour each time or something.

I have never done the One Day Arm Cure but I’ve read it’s quite stressful, trying to do something like that in a squat or similar movement would probably leave most people dead, literally.[/quote]

Didn’t Arnie used to do the squat for a day routine? You’d have more chance of survival on the squat. More muscles on the job.

[quote]wfifer wrote:
Professor X wrote:

There were several months where me and two other guys who I used to train with would do pull ups as the first thing we did when we got to the gym. It was like our “warm up” before we did anything else. Did I overtrain my back? No. It grew bigger and stronger and to this day I am glad I spent that time doing that.

Would you mind sharing some details? It strikes me as something I’d like to try. [/quote]

Do it man.

It’s called priority. If you want to put emphasis on a particular part, you do that at the beginning of the workout. If you want to take it a step further, put it at the beginning of every workout.

[quote]Andrew Dixon wrote:
Didn’t Arnie used to do the squat for a day routine? You’d have more chance of survival on the squat. More muscles on the job. [/quote]

If you think a full day of squats sounds easier than a full day of curls and extensions, I really have to ask, have you ever lifted weights before?

[quote]Mike Benfield wrote:
Andrew Dixon wrote:
Didn’t Arnie used to do the squat for a day routine? You’d have more chance of survival on the squat. More muscles on the job.

If you think a full day of squats sounds easier than a full day of curls and extensions, I really have to ask, have you ever lifted weights before?

[/quote]

He didn’t say it would be easier. He said it would be more survivable due to the fact that the work is spread over more of the body. A statement I actually find reasonable though he and I have not always seen eye to eye.