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FTC Fines Weight Loss Pill Makers

FYI about some weight loss pills:

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,241517,00.html

[quote]PRBogey wrote:
FYI about some weight loss pills:

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,241517,00.html
[/quote]

It’s about time!

That’s a good thing? Why? If people aren’t smart enough to understand that the claims are purely marketing they deserve to be duped.

This is good news. Supplement companies that use false or misleading statements should be punished.

[quote]eengrms76 wrote:
If people aren’t smart enough to understand that the claims are purely marketing they deserve to be duped.[/quote]

So it’s okay to steal from stupid people?

Oh shit, you mean to tell me those weight loss pills don’t work?? How am I gonna cut now, yo?

[quote]CaliforniaLaw wrote:
eengrms76 wrote:
If people aren’t smart enough to understand that the claims are purely marketing they deserve to be duped.

So it’s okay to steal from stupid people?[/quote]

HA!

[quote]CaliforniaLaw wrote:
eengrms76 wrote:
If people aren’t smart enough to understand that the claims are purely marketing they deserve to be duped.

So it’s okay to steal from stupid people?[/quote]

How is it stealing? The people voluntarily buy the product. Regardless if the weight loss claims are provable or not, the companies don’t trick anyone into buying their product.

All of the products still carry the “results not typical” phrase. Besides- how many people buying these products are buying them for the first time and actually expect them to work miracles? I would venture to guess not many.

Also- all of the products somewhere on the package label say that the product should be used in conjunction with proper diet and exercise. If the people buy them and don’t follow that how is it the companies fault just because they say you can lose weight with them? I don’t think any of them say you can lose weight with the pill alone.

But why stop at these companies for these products? The FTC could go to town on the entire industry and make billions.

[quote]David Barr wrote:
But why stop at these companies for these products? The FTC could go to town on the entire industry and make billions.[/quote]

Maybe the targeted companies didn’t donate to their congressmen?

[quote]eengrms76 wrote:
How is it stealing? The people voluntarily buy the product. [/quote]

Are you playing stupid? When someone LIES to you to obtain your money, they have stolen from you. Did I really need to explain that?

[quote]David Barr wrote:
But why stop at these companies for these products? The FTC could go to town on the entire industry and make billions.[/quote]

Not sure if you’re being sarcastic. In any event, I agree. There is rampant labelling fraud in the industry - in addition to false and deceptive advertising. I’d love to see the hammer brought down on the numerous snake oil companies out there.

[quote]CaliforniaLaw wrote:
eengrms76 wrote:
How is it stealing? The people voluntarily buy the product.

Are you playing stupid? When someone LIES to you to obtain your money, they have stolen from you. Did I really need to explain that?[/quote]

I’m not playing stupid- I understand that point and to some degree this is true. I don’t think, however, that they are lying as much as they are exaggerating with their marketing.

If the products were shown to have absolutely no effect, even with the “diet and exercise” the packaging states is required, then yes I would say they are stealing. But the fact is the FTC doesn’t have this proof. They are putting the burden of proof on the companies for no reason other than the fact they just “know” they don’t work.

All companies do it with every product sold. Find me one product that doesn’t exaggerate its abilities in it’s marketing. There are ads depicting that if you drink their beer hot chicks will be all over you. The fact that they don’t actually say that on the package doesn’t change the fact they are doing the same thing. Are the beer companies stealing from their customers?

What about Subway? They basically say that you can lose a shitload of weight just by eating their sandwiches. They don’t even say that you need to exercise. Can I claim Subway is stealing my money because I’ve never lost weight eating at Subway?

I could give you twenty more examples but I think you see my point. You may not agree, and that’s fine, but if the person buying the OTC diet pill isn’t aware of what exactly they are putting in their body and is dumb enough to just take the packages word for it- it’s not the companies fault. I know, being the critical thinker you are, that you would never take something without doing research on it. Yes they could be a little more “honest” in their marketing, but how many products have you purchased that were packaged with scientific studies?

In effect this ruling only helps the truly stupid/lazy people. Hence the reason for my first post. I wasn’t purposely trying to be argumentative, I honestly believe that people are 100% accountable for what they choose to purchase, in the event they aren’t blatantly lied to.

I’m glad Biotest is (by all appearances) an ethical company.

At least this was the FTC and not the FDA – going after people for false and misleading advertising is good. People should not be able to sell snake oil with that kind of advertising. If it were the FDA, they’d be looking to take all of these things away – including HRX, which seems to work.