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Fruits + Nuts ??

All those ME’ers & PN’ers

Since fruit is Carb and nuts are Fat. Is it ok to have a snack/meal comprising of a fruit and nut i.e apple with almonds etc

In JB’s article 7 habits it advocate including veggies or fruits with each meal. So is it ok to eat fruit on every meal.

Thanks

[quote]Axe wrote:
All those ME’ers & PN’ers

Since fruit is Carb and nuts are Fat. Is it ok to have a snack/meal comprising of a fruit and nut i.e apple with almonds etc

In JB’s article 7 habits it advocate including veggies or fruits with each meal. So is it ok to eat fruit on every meal.

Thanks [/quote]

Well both fruit and veg are very low GI its not really a big deal. Of course protein should be eaten at the same time too.

Then again why do you want to do this? Cant you have fruit/veg for one meal and nuts with the other?

Have your nuts and fruit too. People take it way WAY to far there is a HUGE difference in mixing carbs and fat in the form of a doughnut and carbs and fat in say an apple and walnuts. Both are great foods.

EAT EM!!

[quote]comedypedro wrote:
Well both fruit and veg are very low GI its not really a big deal. Of course protein should be eaten at the same time too.
[/quote]

Nuts actually have decent levels of protein. Between the two, I believe most if not all of the 8 essential aminos are covered.

As far as I know, nuts are NOT a complete protein. I only eat it as a fat source, and take another source of protein with it.
Besides, to get a big amount of protein out of nuts, you need to eat a lot of them. OK, if you need tons of calories.

Fruit and veggies don’t spike your insulin so you can eat them together with nuts, but I would add a protein source as well.

I regulary eat cottage cheese with a tablespoon of milled flax seedes and an apple, for a snack.

[quote]kova wrote:
I regulary eat cottage cheese with a tablespoon of milled flax seedes and an apple, for a snack.[/quote]

That’s a great snack. I add some Splenda, cinnamon and sometimes a little whey (chocolate). Yummy!

depending on your goal, I would really watch the portion sizes…if you are wishing to lose bf% there are better options than fruit (especially dried) and nuts…maybe its just me but I have a hard time sticking to the right portion when it comes to nuts?

I’m of the mind that JB’s earlier theories of keeping meals to P+F or P+C were a bit more psychological in nature. More specifically a way to get you to change your habits/behavior by making you:

  1. Think more specifically about what KINDS of fats, proteins and carbs you are ingesting. You can speculate about having a balanced meal, but if your meal involves only protein and fat…you’re going to choose that fat and think about it a lot more than if it was just one of the elements in a complete meal.
  2. Remove most of the unhealthy foods from your diet by default: candy, cake, pizza, nachos, macaroni and cheese…etc…would all be eliminated because they wouldn’t fall into P+F or P+C.

I’m fairly certain Berardi did not come up with his meal combo theories as a way to keep people from eating healthy fats like nuts with a piece of fruit.

And if you are following his 7 habits, you are very much going to have meals including both fat and carbs.

[quote]lmd wrote:
depending on your goal, I would really watch the portion sizes…if you are wishing to lose bf% there are better options than fruit (especially dried) and nuts…maybe its just me but I have a hard time sticking to the right portion when it comes to nuts?[/quote]

Portion size of nuts is a hard decision. I would allways like to add an extra handfull :wink:

[quote]MR1 wrote:
Fruit and veggies don’t spike your insulin…[/quote]

Really? So sugar doesn’t spike insulin now? Not all fruits are low GI, in fact most of them are moderate to high GI with decent GL levels. If you eat enough of them you can certainly spike your insulin.

[quote]eengrms76 wrote:
MR1 wrote:
Fruit and veggies don’t spike your insulin…

Really? So sugar doesn’t spike insulin now? Not all fruits are low GI, in fact most of them are moderate to high GI with decent GL levels. If you eat enough of them you can certainly spike your insulin.[/quote]

Today’s nutrition tip comes from Cy Willson:

Don’t Fear Fruit

Fructose is an insulin-independent monosachharide. This means that it converts into glucose and is stored without the action of insulin (or, at least, insignificant amounts). Fructose doesn’t cause a large rise in blood sugar and, consequently, won’t raise insulin levels. For you to experience any negative effects from fructose, you’d have to consume around 50-75 grams in a sitting; that’s five to seven apples, one after another. You’d have to eat three or four of these “servings” a day, for a grand total of 15-28 pieces of fruit! Fructose has actually been shown to facilitate both mobilization of endogenous lipid stores and lipid oxidation. This means that getting a little fructose in your diet might actually help you lose fat.

Fructose is stored in the liver,then converted into glucose .It’s a much slower process than white sugar.
Fructose it’s self is lower on the glycemic scale.You’d have to eat about 5-7 apples to get an insulin spike.[quote]eengrms76 wrote:
MR1 wrote:
Fruit and veggies don’t spike your insulin…

Really? So sugar doesn’t spike insulin now? Not all fruits are low GI, in fact most of them are moderate to high GI with decent GL levels. If you eat enough of them you can certainly spike your insulin.[/quote]

That all just pretty much proves what I said, if you eat enough of it you can spike it. Simple as that.

Also - the example used was faulty at best- apples. One of the lowest GI fruits available. Try to apply that same example to berries or melons and you’d get a completely different result. Just one or two servings of watermelon will spike your blood sugar, not as high as a snickers bar- sure, but a spike is a spike.

[quote]eengrms76 wrote:
That all just pretty much proves what I said, if you eat enough of it you can spike it. Simple as that.

Also - the example used was faulty at best- apples. One of the lowest GI fruits available. Try to apply that same example to berries or melons and you’d get a completely different result. Just one or two servings of watermelon will spike your blood sugar, not as high as a snickers bar- sure, but a spike is a spike.[/quote]

You’re right that it can spike your insulin, it depends on the fruit type and how much you eat. And yes, an apple contains the most fructose from all fruits.
It’s better to say it won’t spike your insulin that much, and it has so many other health benefits that you shouldn’t be afraid of it. Especially red fruits like berries and apples are great, rich of anti-oxidants.
But most people take 1 or 2 pieces, and the benefits from fruit are big so imo it’s not a problem. Besides, if you eat it with protein the insulin will release slower. And especially when you eat it in the beginning of the day (when your insulin sensivity is higher) it’s not a problem.

[quote]eengrms76 wrote:
That all just pretty much proves what I said, if you eat enough of it you can spike it. Simple as that.

Also - the example used was faulty at best- apples. One of the lowest GI fruits available. Try to apply that same example to berries or melons and you’d get a completely different result. Just one or two servings of watermelon will spike your blood sugar, not as high as a snickers bar- sure, but a spike is a spike.[/quote]

You mean I can stop carrying all these watermelons about with me? Cos all bodybuilders eat loads of watermelon…

I have had to tell a few of my clients that if they want to reach there goals … eating 2 lb of grapes is not ok just because it is a fruit. Same with nuts, just because it is natural does not mean it is ok to eat without regard.

To me, Glycemic load seems more important than glycemic index when talking about changes in blood glucose as it is serving specific.

surely if you take protein nuts and fruits at the same time that evens out to a very low GI load?

obviously lots of calories in the nuts, so careful if cutting

[quote]MR1 wrote:
You’re right that it can spike your insulin, it depends on the fruit type and how much you eat. And yes, an apple contains the most fructose from all fruits.
It’s better to say it won’t spike your insulin that much, and it has so many other health benefits that you shouldn’t be afraid of it. Especially red fruits like berries and apples are great, rich of anti-oxidants.
But most people take 1 or 2 pieces, and the benefits from fruit are big so imo it’s not a problem. Besides, if you eat it with protein the insulin will release slower. And especially when you eat it in the beginning of the day (when your insulin sensivity is higher) it’s not a problem.[/quote]

I never said don’t eat fruit, just pointed out that it’s not a “free food” just beacuse it takes a lot to make a difference. Hell I eat 4-6 servings of fruit daily.

[quote]comedypedro wrote:
You mean I can stop carrying all these watermelons about with me? Cos all bodybuilders eat loads of watermelon…[/quote]

I don’t know, watermelons are kind of heavy. Might be good GPP…

[quote]lmd wrote:
I have had to tell a few of my clients that if they want to reach there goals … eating 2 lb of grapes is not ok just because it is a fruit. Same with nuts, just because it is natural does not mean it is ok to eat without regard.

To me, Glycemic load seems more important than glycemic index when talking about changes in blood glucose as it is serving specific.[/quote]

Excellent post lmd…

Yeah,well watermelons don’t have any fat in them so no fat gets stored when the insulin gets spiked anyway.
I never got fat from eating water melons.

[quote]eengrms76 wrote:
That all just pretty much proves what I said, if you eat enough of it you can spike it. Simple as that.

Also - the example used was faulty at best- apples. One of the lowest GI fruits available. Try to apply that same example to berries or melons and you’d get a completely different result. Just one or two servings of watermelon will spike your blood sugar, not as high as a snickers bar- sure, but a spike is a spike.[/quote]