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Fructose Post-Workout Expectations

Is it possible to get as high of an insulin spike with fructose as with, say, malto ?

It seems to me that it would be, although I can imagine that one might have to consume more fructose than malto to get an equivalent spike.

I understand that fructose is not absorbed by the muscles, but is rather absorbed only by the liver. Is this simply true, or is it more complicated than that? And finally, practically speaking, does the location in which fructose is stored as glycogen have a significant impact on recovery from strength and endurance training?

Please pardon the simple questions,

Ross Hunt

[quote]Ross Hunt wrote:
Is it possible to get as high of an insulin spike with fructose as with, say, malto ? [/quote]

Nope, not even close.

Fructose is actually low GI. And the stuff about it being stored in the liver is true… at least, fructose has to be processed by the liver, though I’m not sure if or under what conditions the glycogen made from fructose can ultimately be used by muscle, you’re not going to get that immediate insulin spike and muscle glycogen replenishment.

Assuming you are getting fructose from whole foods like fruit, and not pure fructose (which would be pretty nutty imo) the fiber will moderate absorption and prevent a massive blood-sugar spike.

You can get bulk malto and glucose pretty cheap.

Nick

Fructose is processed by the liver because the enzymes to do so exist there. Like mentioned above, don’t use fructose PWO rather go for malto/dextro combination.

G