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Front Squats from Pins?


#1

I've been training now for 2.5 months very consistently. If it helps to answer my question what I have been doing and stats are here: http://tnation.tmuscle.com/free_online_forum/blog_sports_body_training_performance_bodybuilding_log/jakerz_log

Shortened version: I am 6 foot 2 210 lbs, looking to get bigger and stronger
Front squat 275x1
Deadlift 385x2

Very simply I want to change things up a bit and one thing I was considering was to start doing front squats from pins. My idea was set the pins at or slightly below parallel in my squat and drop down wait 2 seconds then come up and do these with ramped weight until I hit my 3-5 rep max for that day, then remove the pins up the wait and do then without the pause.

So my question is: Is this a good way to build squat power (read increase weight and power for jumping) and up the weight I can handle or is this a technique for more advanced lifters than me? Is there any sort of technique breakdown I should watch for or protect against when doing these?


#2

Deadstop front squats (front squats from pins in the bottom position) are, or at least were, one of Dan John's favorite movements. He's written about them before:
http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/3_simple_tips_that_work

It's not necessarily an "advanced" technique, it's something different than what you're used to, that can help to break through a plateau and spark new progress. Including them for a 4-6 week cycle wouldn't be a terrible idea.

Technique-wise, you might want to start with singles and/or doubles at first, to get familiar with staying tight from the bottom position. You might be surprised at how the deadstop effects the weight you can use.

I don't really see any major strength benefit to doing deadstops and then doing "normal" front squats in the same workout. It would increase your squatting volume and might give you more of a size stimulus, but strength-wise, you'd be better served focusing on the deadstops for several sets, and then moving on to other assistance exercises.


#3

I was hoping you'd reply. Thanks for the info. You've been a great help everytime.


#4

I was hoping you'd reply. Thanks for the info. You've been a great help everytime.