T Nation

Front Squat Help


#1

Hey guys, when the weight gets heavier I tend to lean forward right out of the hole and round my upper back a little bit. As you can see it's a relatively fast squat without a sticky point and I think that these things souldn't happen


#2

Kinda pressed for time so i’ll be blunt.
Take weight off the bar until your form is perfect. Then do alot of work right at the max that you can keep the form right. That way it becomes a reflex. Then work up bit by bit.
Add more weight than you can do a full squat properly and do partials…with good form.

Or, keep adding weight using your current form and you will not have to worry about it cause you will injure yourself and you won’t have to squat at all.

LB


#3

His form looks fine. How are you going to injury yourself on a front squat? Too much forward lean and the bar falls away from you.


#4

It’s fine for a top range lift. As you lift front squats in the lower weights be conscious of driving through the heels. It should push your hips forward and keep your torso more upright.

As you do this, you might find your legs are not as strong as your back, so the weight will feel heavier.

Want more weight, drive through mid-foot. Want bigger or stronger quads, drive through heels.

Also, core work will help… Personally I refuse to do that.


#5

[quote]LBramble wrote:
Kinda pressed for time so i’ll be blunt.
Take weight off the bar until your form is perfect. Then do alot of work right at the max that you can keep the form right. That way it becomes a reflex. Then work up bit by bit.
Add more weight than you can do a full squat properly and do partials…with good form.

Or, keep adding weight using your current form and you will not have to worry about it cause you will injure yourself and you won’t have to squat at all.

LB[/quote]

I think that you didn’t even watch the video


#6

[quote]drewc64 wrote:
It’s fine for a top range lift. As you lift front squats in the lower weights be conscious of driving through the heels. It should push your hips forward and keep your torso more upright.

As you do this, you might find your legs are not as strong as your back, so the weight will feel heavier.

Want more weight, drive through mid-foot. Want bigger or stronger quads, drive through heels.

Also, core work will help… Personally I refuse to do that.[/quote]

I do notice that when i push through my heels i don’t lean forward, but as the weight gets heavier I feel like i will fail the lift if I push through my heels. So does that mean that my legs are weaker than my back? Or my core maybe?


#7

[quote]karydas91 wrote:

[quote]LBramble wrote:
Kinda pressed for time so i’ll be blunt.
Take weight off the bar until your form is perfect. Then do alot of work right at the max that you can keep the form right. That way it becomes a reflex. Then work up bit by bit.
Add more weight than you can do a full squat properly and do partials…with good form.

Or, keep adding weight using your current form and you will not have to worry about it cause you will injure yourself and you won’t have to squat at all.

LB[/quote]

I think that you didn’t even watch the video
[/quote]

Why do you think he didn’t watch the video? He’s coming at this like an olympic weightlifter, generally they don’t like slow grindy lifts where your positions break down.


#8

[quote]karydas91 wrote:

[quote]drewc64 wrote:
It’s fine for a top range lift. As you lift front squats in the lower weights be conscious of driving through the heels. It should push your hips forward and keep your torso more upright.

As you do this, you might find your legs are not as strong as your back, so the weight will feel heavier.

Want more weight, drive through mid-foot. Want bigger or stronger quads, drive through heels.

Also, core work will help… Personally I refuse to do that.[/quote]

I do notice that when i push through my heels i don’t lean forward, but as the weight gets heavier I feel like i will fail the lift if I push through my heels. So does that mean that my legs are weaker than my back? Or my core maybe?[/quote]

Weak quads and upper back.

Your back shouldn’t round that much IMO. It’s very acceptable for most people IMO but notice how not many of the top countries squat videos they NEVER round at all. Bolt upright back positions. Your speed up is good for a 1RM.

Legs:
I’d suggest paused front or back squats, focusing on keeping your back upright, tight and driving with your quads.

Show us a video of a few reps with lighter weights paused and not paused

Back:
Bent over rows
Hypers

Koing


#9

Not even Klokov stays completely upright. I think it’s a proportions thing.


#10

[quote]amayakyrol wrote:
Not even Klokov stays completely upright. I think it’s a proportions thing.

Klokov is much more upright than the OP. Klokov’s tempo and position is more ideal and what people should work towards IMO.

The bolt upright comment was to get him more upright.

Koing


#11

[quote]Koing wrote:

[quote]karydas91 wrote:

[quote]drewc64 wrote:
It’s fine for a top range lift. As you lift front squats in the lower weights be conscious of driving through the heels. It should push your hips forward and keep your torso more upright.

As you do this, you might find your legs are not as strong as your back, so the weight will feel heavier.

Want more weight, drive through mid-foot. Want bigger or stronger quads, drive through heels.

Also, core work will help… Personally I refuse to do that.[/quote]

I do notice that when i push through my heels i don’t lean forward, but as the weight gets heavier I feel like i will fail the lift if I push through my heels. So does that mean that my legs are weaker than my back? Or my core maybe?[/quote]

Weak quads and upper back.

Your back shouldn’t round that much IMO. It’s very acceptable for most people IMO but notice how not many of the top countries squat videos they NEVER round at all. Bolt upright back positions. Your speed up is good for a 1RM.

Legs:
I’d suggest paused front or back squats, focusing on keeping your back upright, tight and driving with your quads.

Show us a video of a few reps with lighter weights paused and not paused

Back:
Bent over rows
Hypers

Koing[/quote]

Hey, thanks. That was the kind of response I was looking for. Since I posted the video I managed to do 3 set of 2 with that weight and now I started a new build-up cycle with paused front squats, hoping they will fix my legs weakness. As for the bent-over rows they have to be one of my worst exercises, so I’m thinking to incorporate weighted pull-ups instead
Sorry for my English.


#12

[quote]karydas91 wrote:
Hey, thanks. That was the kind of response I was looking for. Since I posted the video I managed to do 3 set of 2 with that weight and now I started a new build-up cycle with paused front squats, hoping they will fix my legs weakness. As for the bent-over rows they have to be one of my worst exercises, so I’m thinking to incorporate weighted pull-ups instead
Sorry for my English.
[/quote]

If bent over rows are one of your worse excesses it is EXACTLY why you should be doing it. Your back is rounding so you need to fix it. Bent over rows. You can do weighted pull ups as well but don’t skip the bent over rows.

Koing


#13

[quote]Koing wrote:

[quote]karydas91 wrote:
Hey, thanks. That was the kind of response I was looking for. Since I posted the video I managed to do 3 set of 2 with that weight and now I started a new build-up cycle with paused front squats, hoping they will fix my legs weakness. As for the bent-over rows they have to be one of my worst exercises, so I’m thinking to incorporate weighted pull-ups instead
Sorry for my English.
[/quote]

If bent over rows are one of your worse excesses it is EXACTLY why you should be doing it. Your back is rounding so you need to fix it. Bent over rows. You can do weighted pull ups as well but don’t skip the bent over rows.

Koing[/quote]
Yeah, if you want to get better, you need to attack your weaknesses, not avoid them. Personally, I prefer heavy seated cable rows because bent over rows destroy my lower back in a bad way (like tighten up to the point where I can’t get up and walk around), probably because the muscles in my core/hips don’t always work synergistically like they’re supposed to, but I’m working on that.

And I always try to get my front squats to look like this:


.

#14

[quote]TheJonty wrote:

[quote]Koing wrote:

[quote]karydas91 wrote:
Hey, thanks. That was the kind of response I was looking for. Since I posted the video I managed to do 3 set of 2 with that weight and now I started a new build-up cycle with paused front squats, hoping they will fix my legs weakness. As for the bent-over rows they have to be one of my worst exercises, so I’m thinking to incorporate weighted pull-ups instead
Sorry for my English.
[/quote]

If bent over rows are one of your worse excesses it is EXACTLY why you should be doing it. Your back is rounding so you need to fix it. Bent over rows. You can do weighted pull ups as well but don’t skip the bent over rows.

Koing[/quote]
Yeah, if you want to get better, you need to attack your weaknesses, not avoid them. Personally, I prefer heavy seated cable rows because bent over rows destroy my lower back in a bad way (like tighten up to the point where I can’t get up and walk around), probably because the muscles in my core/hips don’t always work synergistically like they’re supposed to, but I’m working on that.

And I always try to get my front squats to look like this:


.[/quote]

No seated cable row machine at my gym :frowning:

Koing


#15

You’re pushing your hips backwards. It’s a front squat, not a back squat, so you want to stay under the bar, put your hips down between your ankles.