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Front Squat Form?

When I FT squat, I seem to fall foward while standing up from the squat, even if i keep my elbows high. Does this problem come from weak abs and lower back, like in the back squat? Is the form for this exercise the same as back squats (chest out head back, and sitting back on the heals)? And does any one have some tips on how to keep my elbows up through out the movment?

Thanks
Will42

[quote]Will42 wrote:
When I FT squat, I seem to fall foward while standing up from the squat, even if i keep my elbows high. Does this problem come from weak abs and lower back, like in the back squat?
[/quote]

Sometimes. It can also come from tight calves (soleus mostly) or quads, or from weak/tired upper back musculature.

Basically yes, you’re obviously just going to be more vertical. This means more dorsiflexion and knee flexion - don’t be afraid to let the knees go over the toes as long as the weight stays on your heels.

Practice a lot. Honestly, it feels weird to most people, so just getting used to it will help. If flexibility is an issue rather than just paying attention to it, stretch the lats, rhomboids, triceps, and forearm musculature.

Have a good one,

Dan

Since the bar is resting on your shoulders,touching your neck,instead of accross the traps-the weight being well in front-your body posture should be more upright.The quads will have to do more work as opposed to back squats-so use a much lower weight.If you lean forward,your glutes and hamstrings are compensating for quad weakness.It takes a bit of practice to do front squats correctly.

Another thing that helps as with the back sqaut you want to lead with the head and upper back getting high and tight but also really push those elbows that are in front of the bar to the sky by doing that you force the whole body to be more erect.

[quote]Phill wrote:
Another thing that helps as with the back sqaut you want to lead with the head and upper back getting high and tight but also really push those elbows that are in front of the bar to the sky by doing that you force the whole body to be more erect.

[/quote]

I have been doing front squats as I work out at home and don’t have a squat rack or cage yet. My first question is, does it work the hamstrings indirectly or directly. Secondly, is it a good workout for the whole leg?
Thanks!

It’s mainly a quad excercise for me…

I know it’s considered bad in powerlifting form to let your knees travel too far forward, but doing so will help you stay balanced at the bottom. You sit back to a point, then as you get into the bottom of the squat you should start to let your knees travel forward to keep your torso upright. I think this is one of the things that makes them harder, there’s no help from your power gut…

[quote]rmarquez wrote:
Phill wrote:
Another thing that helps as with the back sqaut you want to lead with the head and upper back getting high and tight but also really push those elbows that are in front of the bar to the sky by doing that you force the whole body to be more erect.

I have been doing front squats as I work out at home and don’t have a squat rack or cage yet. My first question is, does it work the hamstrings indirectly or directly. Secondly, is it a good workout for the whole leg?
Thanks![/quote]

If you stay on your heels keep chest high back tight sure it work the whole leg. Sure it will be more quad just by the nature of the weight being up front but if you stay in good form you will work the whole leg and the posterior chain very well.

[quote]Phill wrote:
Another thing that helps as with the back sqaut you want to lead with the head and upper back getting high and tight but also really push those elbows that are in front of the bar to the sky by doing that you force the whole body to be more erect.

[/quote]

Ditto with regard to leading with the head. Initiate the upward movement with the top of your head and the rest should follow. When I was looking for a good picture of front squat form I found this one which illustrates a good straight back and high elbows. She has more fingers on the bar than I like, but she’s probably more flexible than me.

Weak posterior chain…
If you can’t keep your elbows up you either have tight triceps or tight wrist flexors. Do an active stretch for both. Possible tight psoas and definite quad dominance in muscle firing patterns. Push with your hips not your knees.
Only handle a weight you can do with correct form and at LEAST hit parallel on this exercise to strengthen your glutes. Go hard…

this is how i do mine… you can lean forward more that you think without losing the bar. like the guy said earlier, it is just a matter of getting used to it.

Thanks for the tips guys. The video and pic helped out a lot. I’ll try them again tommorow. Now If I could fix my OHP issues…

i had surgery on my right hand so it is hard for me to do the olympic form front squat because it kills my hand and i cant even finish them because my hand feels liek it is gunan break. the crossed arm one doesnt work that good because it always slips off my shoulders. is there any other ways?

To me these are very difficult to do. I tend to lean forward and lose the weight. With decent form I can barely do 165.

[quote]livinthedream wrote:
the crossed arm one doesnt work that good because it always slips off my shoulders. is there any other ways?[/quote]

It shouldn’t slip off your shoulders, you have to keep your elbows and chest up in the cross grip too.

[quote]livinthedream wrote:
i had surgery on my right hand so it is hard for me to do the olympic form front squat because it kills my hand and i cant even finish them because my hand feels liek it is gunan break. the crossed arm one doesnt work that good because it always slips off my shoulders. is there any other ways?[/quote]

No-handed front squats. Really forces you to stay upright.

I’m a beginner. While we’re on this topic, how important is it to use a squat rack when doing a front squat (as opposed to just using a barbell and doing the squat without the rack)?

I’m asking b/c I can do everything in exercise A of Phase II of the Scrawny 2 Brawny program at home if I don’t use a squat rack. If it’s not safe without the rack or if it would be more effective with the rack, I’ll go the gym, though. Thanks!

[quote]eic wrote:
livinthedream wrote:
i had surgery on my right hand so it is hard for me to do the olympic form front squat because it kills my hand and i cant even finish them because my hand feels liek it is gunan break. the crossed arm one doesnt work that good because it always slips off my shoulders. is there any other ways?

No-handed front squats. Really forces you to stay upright. [/quote]

Agree. Stick your hands out at slightly above should height like a zombie and squat. It’ll really enforce good form.

[quote]Bonn1997 wrote:
I’m a beginner. While we’re on this topic, how important is it to use a squat rack when doing a front squat (as opposed to just using a barbell and doing the squat without the rack)?

I’m asking b/c I can do everything in exercise A of Phase II of the Scrawny 2 Brawny program at home if I don’t use a squat rack. If it’s not safe without the rack or if it would be more effective with the rack, I’ll go the gym, though. Thanks![/quote]

I don’t have a squat rack or squat cage. I just pull it off the floor olympic style to my hip, then up to my chest/shoulders and then squat for 3 reps. Then slowly reverse the steps. That is one set for me. To do it this way, I notice that I can only do (safely/correctly) about 115lbs on heavy days. Then again I have only been working out for the past 4 months…

[quote]rmarquez wrote:
Bonn1997 wrote:
I’m a beginner. While we’re on this topic, how important is it to use a squat rack when doing a front squat (as opposed to just using a barbell and doing the squat without the rack)?

I’m asking b/c I can do everything in exercise A of Phase II of the Scrawny 2 Brawny program at home if I don’t use a squat rack. If it’s not safe without the rack or if it would be more effective with the rack, I’ll go the gym, though. Thanks!

I don’t have a squat rack or squat cage. I just pull it off the floor olympic style to my hip, then up to my chest/shoulders and then squat for 3 reps. Then slowly reverse the steps. That is one set for me. To do it this way, I notice that I can only do (safely/correctly) about 115lbs on heavy days. Then again I have only been working out for the past 4 months…[/quote]

Are you saying you’re able to do less weight because you have to exert energy to bring the weights up off the floor all the way to shoulder level? I hadn’t really thought about this factor.