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Front or Rear Lat Pulldown

I have a dilema. Currently in my program i’m doing both the Front lat Pulldown and Rear Lat pulldown.
Also on Shoulder day i’m doing front and rear Military.

Is this necessary? I can obviously lift more on both front lifts, but i’d feel that i was missing out if i dropped the rear lifts.

Any thoughts?

Rear lat pulldowns are not a smart idea IMO. What’s the point? over a front lat pulldown, or at the very least a pulldown in-line with the ears through a particular machine

Front. I find rear lat pulldowns to be uncomfortable and awkward.

I think rear lat pulldowns are great if a person can get used to the movement pattern and the activation of the muscles involved.

Best way is to cut them out for a few months and take some progress pictures and see if there are any visual differences in my opinion. If not then your not getting any benefit from the exercise the way you use them. Find what works best for you or figure out how to make it work.

also a fan of front lats… rear seems to be old school to me… (just my opinion)… if ur usin heavy weight front seems to be better… i dont really find and need to do rear. and if im not mistaken fromt lets u have a better ROM…

Like you, I used to do both presses and
lat machine both front and rear. Behind the neck presses were supposed to hit the medial delts more than military presses
which were believed to work the anterior
head more.

Also, the conventional wisdom I
had access to indicated that rear pulldowns
built the upper part of the lats more than front ones. Some of this cw probably came from the fact that Steve Reeves did behind the neck chin ups and Frank Zane did both movements to the front and to the rear.

More recently, we are advised not to do either movement to the rear for fear of injury. I have made the change as an injury is the last thing I need. I had
actually abandoned military presses and had gotten quite comfortable with behind the neck presses.

When I did try military
presses I found I couldn’t use as much weight as I did behind the neck. Now I
wonder if I may have lost some flexibility
and rom by doing them that way. For pressing
I generally use dbs now as I am getting a
bit long of tooth. They are a bit harder to handle so they work the core but I feel safer with them.

Some trainers say behind the neck presses are okay as long as you don’t go down past
the level of your ears.

Hope this helped.

Behind the head/neck movements (especially your pulldowns and military presses), are really hard on your shoulders, namely the rotator cuff. They also put you at pretty significant risk for neck injury, especially if you’re predisposed to having back posture and/or alignment in your cervical spine.

Long story short: avoid them.

Yea I agree with sherekahn… you do get a better rom with front, and they r safer… so why not just stick with front…

Cheers guys, that really helps!

What would you say between wide grip lat pulldowns and close grip lat pulldowns?

Ive always heard wide is for upper part of lats and narrow is for lower…

I’ll stick with the wide so! Cheers.

[quote]utHAUS wrote:
Behind the head/neck movements (especially your pulldowns and military presses), are really hard on your shoulders, namely the rotator cuff. They also put you at pretty significant risk for neck injury, especially if you’re predisposed to having back posture and/or alignment in your cervical spine.

Long story short: avoid them.[/quote]

Agreed.

I blew out my shoulders doing heavy (unwarmed up) behind the neck presses… if your shoulders can hack it, and you’re warmed up enough… do it up… but you’ll likely get as good a workout from doing them in front anyway so…

Do this one in addition to whichever you choose. I recommend a higher rep range (8-10), purely out of observation and experience. I can honestly say this is one of the best general back movements.

Ive mentioned this movement before, be sure to use a considerably wider crossover station, use a thumbless grip on the cable stack handles. As long as your wrists aren’t flexed (ask the nearest engineer why if you want to), the cables will always be along an extension of your forearms and so bicep contribution is nil.

Go heavy and I mean HEEEAAVVVVYYYY, try to hook yourself at the bottom and stretch out as far as possible (to engage the lats) at the start of each rep.
Whichever way you decide to pull (try to squeeze at the end) you’ll be working some aspect of the back. As long as you STREEEEEEETTCHHH at the beginning (under heavy enough weight) ou will engage the lats.

Another way to do this is to use it for lat-activation (go lighter obviously) before doing pulldowns or pullups.