T Nation

Frank Mirs Weight Training ....


#1

...routine before the brock lesnar fight?

???


#2

who the hell would know that


#3

LOL. why? You wanna follow the routine so you can get your ass kicked too?


#4

yeah, why not ask for the winner’s weight lifter routine? He was the bigger and stronger fighter in that match anyhow. And if you wanna know his, this is all I have:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tWm_CANid0


#5

He looked like he was in pretty good shape. I would be interested in the S&C routines of some the HWs. They better be doing some work with heavy weights given the giants they have to fight. I am no expert but I always thought that strongman-type training would benefit combat athletes. I think Carwin does some olympic lifts. I think Gonzaga was doing some powerlifting before fighting Carwin. I guess I would do both types of training with variation in exercises and implements.

I have come across workouts from various MMA atheletes and they usually do not focus on heavy weights and strength. I also couln’t help but notice all the bodybuilding machines in Lesnar’s gym. I can’t think of a machine I would waste my time with when training for combat sports. maybe lat PD machine to do standing ab work.

Maybe we ought to prod some of the tnation contributors to do more articles on strength training for MMA. I would imagine many of them are starting to train MMA fighters. I have seen a few but I seem to remember them focusing on energy system training. Are they not training for limit strength or explosiveness?

Most of the wrestlers I knew were the same way. If they lifted at all it was your typical sets of 8 or 12 shit with limited exercises. Really no different than your average joe in the gym. My programs were certainly less than optimal but I could still win some matches against more skilled wrestlers becuase of physical strength. If only I knew then what I know now. With access to the internet and an incredible amount of knowledge, I would guess this may have changed a bit. No internet when I was wrestling.


#6

[quote]B.L.U. Ninja wrote:
LOL. why? You wanna follow the routine so you can get your ass kicked too?[/quote]

lmao


#7

[quote]dhickey wrote:
He looked like he was in pretty good shape. I would be interested in the S&C routines of some the HWs. They better be doing some work with heavy weights given the giants they have to fight. I am no expert but I always thought that strongman-type training would benefit combat athletes. I think Carwin does some olympic lifts. I think Gonzaga was doing some powerlifting before fighting Carwin. I guess I would do both types of training with variation in exercises and implements.

I have come across workouts from various MMA atheletes and they usually do not focus on heavy weights and strength. I also couln’t help but notice all the bodybuilding machines in Lesnar’s gym. I can’t think of a machine I would waste my time with when training for combat sports. maybe lat PD machine to do standing ab work.

Maybe we ought to prod some of the tnation contributors to do more articles on strength training for MMA. I would imagine many of them are starting to train MMA fighters. I have seen a few but I seem to remember them focusing on energy system training. Are they not training for limit strength or explosiveness?

Most of the wrestlers I knew were the same way. If they lifted at all it was your typical sets of 8 or 12 shit with limited exercises. Really no different than your average joe in the gym. My programs were certainly less than optimal but I could still win some matches against more skilled wrestlers becuase of physical strength. If only I knew then what I know now. With access to the internet and an incredible amount of knowledge, I would guess this may have changed a bit. No internet when I was wrestling. [/quote]

bodybuilder type training isent all that bad for a figther firstly because bodybuilders rep heavy weights which gives a both of endurance and strength improvments second bodybuilders focus on every part of the body which builds a stronger core sense your body is developed porportionally but i agree you must include olympic lifts and strongman training into your program which will peak your physical strength.


#8

[quote]xxxwtfxxx wrote:
dhickey wrote:
He looked like he was in pretty good shape. I would be interested in the S&C routines of some the HWs. They better be doing some work with heavy weights given the giants they have to fight. I am no expert but I always thought that strongman-type training would benefit combat athletes. I think Carwin does some olympic lifts. I think Gonzaga was doing some powerlifting before fighting Carwin. I guess I would do both types of training with variation in exercises and implements.

I have come across workouts from various MMA atheletes and they usually do not focus on heavy weights and strength. I also couln’t help but notice all the bodybuilding machines in Lesnar’s gym. I can’t think of a machine I would waste my time with when training for combat sports. maybe lat PD machine to do standing ab work.

Maybe we ought to prod some of the tnation contributors to do more articles on strength training for MMA. I would imagine many of them are starting to train MMA fighters. I have seen a few but I seem to remember them focusing on energy system training. Are they not training for limit strength or explosiveness?

Most of the wrestlers I knew were the same way. If they lifted at all it was your typical sets of 8 or 12 shit with limited exercises. Really no different than your average joe in the gym. My programs were certainly less than optimal but I could still win some matches against more skilled wrestlers becuase of physical strength. If only I knew then what I know now. With access to the internet and an incredible amount of knowledge, I would guess this may have changed a bit. No internet when I was wrestling.

bodybuilder type training isent all that bad for a figther firstly because bodybuilders rep heavy weights which gives a both of endurance and strength improvments second bodybuilders focus on every part of the body which builds a stronger core sense your body is developed porportionally but i agree you must include olympic lifts and strongman training into your program which will peak your physical strength.[/quote]

Class of 2009 strikes again.

You guys are just full of fuckin fail.


#9

Having trained using exclusively BB workouts, lifts, rep/set schemes I can say from experience that it was pretty much useless. Except for the occasional strength or weight advantage; very occasional. Really all it did was add a bunch of extra muscle that was doing me little to no good because it wasn’t helping condition my body, or improve on an specific fighting movement. Minus front squats.

I mean how often are you going to press someone when you’re standing up? Never… On the ground? Maybe once, then you get arm-bared and never do it again. I think mixing a few key power lifting lifts, probably a few Olympic lifts, and most likely a decent amount of strong man work, could be a workable routine. But really I think there are better alternatives.

*I’m with Irish


#10

[quote]Beershoes wrote:
Having trained using exclusively BB workouts, lifts, rep/set schemes I can say from experience that it was pretty much useless. Except for the occasional strength or weight advantage; very occasional. Really all it did was add a bunch of extra muscle that was doing me little to no good because it wasn’t helping condition my body, or improve on an specific fighting movement. Minus front squats. I mean how often are you going to press someone when you’re standing up? Never… On the ground? Maybe once, then you get arm-bared and never do it again. I think mixing a few key power lifting lifts, probably a few Olympic lifts, and most likely a decent amount of strong man work, could be a workable routine. But really I think there are better alternatives.

*I’m with Irish [/quote]

ok buddy =) good for you.do powerlifting and teach your muscles to work slow because thats what happends when you train whith extremly heavy weights your forced to do it slow and not explosive like you would if you were doing 8reps and above,when you use higher reps you teach your muscles to move medium weight explosivly and therefor become more explosive.but olmypic lifts such as clean and snatch are very good to do if you want to build explosive strength and farmers walk from strongman improves almost your whole upper body but as i was saying you cant train with heavy weights all the time becuase you will get slow and yes slower then you would get from bulking up on a bodybuilder workout.and u dont need to press people above yourselve when your standing up but when you go for a take down or trying to keep your oppenet from passing guard you use the same muscles you would if you were pressing something up (delts)having strong shoulders is a big key to throwing a hard punch such as hooks and upper cuts.im not saying bb is the best way to get stronger for mma,boxing,ect but it works…


#11

[quote]xxxwtfxxx wrote:

ok buddy =) good for you.do powerlifting and teach your muscles to work slow because thats what happends when you train whith extremly heavy weights your forced to do it slow and not explosive like you would if you were doing 8reps [/quote]

Let me just stop you right there, NO.

When moving heavy weight you try and press/pull that bar as fast as you can. It may seem slow because there is a shit ton of weight on the bar but when I put a sub max load on and like I always do apply max force you should see how fast that bar goes up.


#12

[quote]John S. wrote:
xxxwtfxxx wrote:

ok buddy =) good for you.do powerlifting and teach your muscles to work slow because thats what happends when you train whith extremly heavy weights your forced to do it slow and not explosive like you would if you were doing 8reps

Let me just stop you right there, NO.

When moving heavy weight you try and press/pull that bar as fast as you can. It may seem slow because there is a shit ton of weight on the bar but when I put a sub max load on and like I always do apply max force you should see how fast that bar goes up.[/quote]

It’s sad that you have to explain this to someone with Matt Kroc as an avatar. Fuckin unbelievable.


#13

[quote]Big_Boss wrote:
John S. wrote:
xxxwtfxxx wrote:

ok buddy =) good for you.do powerlifting and teach your muscles to work slow because thats what happends when you train whith extremly heavy weights your forced to do it slow and not explosive like you would if you were doing 8reps

Let me just stop you right there, NO.

When moving heavy weight you try and press/pull that bar as fast as you can. It may seem slow because there is a shit ton of weight on the bar but when I put a sub max load on and like I always do apply max force you should see how fast that bar goes up.

It’s sad that you have to explain this to someone with Matt Kroc as an avatar. Fuckin unbelievable.[/quote]

lmao but i respect powerlifting i have a cousin who competes world wide its not about that im just trying to explaining that i never knew boxers or mma figthers(but i am sure there are)that work out with a powerlifting routine.


#14

[quote]John S. wrote:
xxxwtfxxx wrote:

ok buddy =) good for you.do powerlifting and teach your muscles to work slow because thats what happends when you train whith extremly heavy weights your forced to do it slow and not explosive like you would if you were doing 8reps

Let me just stop you right there, NO.

When moving heavy weight you try and press/pull that bar as fast as you can. It may seem slow because there is a shit ton of weight on the bar but when I put a sub max load on and like I always do apply max force you should see how fast that bar goes up.[/quote]

read any post on this im not making this up if you dont include repition work into your routine or any explosive training you will eventually get slower so u dont need to stop me anywhere.


#15

[quote]xxxwtfxxx wrote:
Big_Boss wrote:
John S. wrote:
xxxwtfxxx wrote:

ok buddy =) good for you.do powerlifting and teach your muscles to work slow because thats what happends when you train whith extremly heavy weights your forced to do it slow and not explosive like you would if you were doing 8reps

Let me just stop you right there, NO.

When moving heavy weight you try and press/pull that bar as fast as you can. It may seem slow because there is a shit ton of weight on the bar but when I put a sub max load on and like I always do apply max force you should see how fast that bar goes up.

It’s sad that you have to explain this to someone with Matt Kroc as an avatar. Fuckin unbelievable.

lmao but i respect powerlifting i have a cousin who competes world wide its not about that im just trying to explaining that i never knew boxers or mma figthers(but i am sure there are)that work out with a powerlifting routine. [/quote]

Well,your “explaining” started way off-based and uninformed. Especially when you blatantly state that powerlifting makes your muscles slow. Not a sign of making a good case for your argument. But to the bigger issue of your argument:

Powerlifting(on its own<----key statement) has its shortcomings and is not a means to an end. I know we agree on that. BUT you opened up Pandora’s Box by stating that bodybuilding type training is BETTER THAN powerlifting. The resounding point you’re trying to make is that powerlifting is bad for fighters…even as you neglect the obvious assumption that lifting heavy weights is only a part of a fighter’s strength/conditioning.


#16

God damn you fucking suck xxxwtfxxx.


#17

LOL. Powerlifting makes you slow? Are you fucking kidding? I mean, don’t get me wrong powerlifters ain’t gonna win any track meets but EXPLOSIVE strength is one of the benefits of powerlifting because they train for bar speed. Look at football players especially linemen. They are explosive more than they are “slow”. And if you think they train like bodybuilders and isolate the shit out of their muscles, then your research is fucked up buddy.


#18

[quote]B.L.U. Ninja wrote:
LOL. Powerlifting makes you slow? Are you fucking kidding? I mean, don’t get me wrong powerlifters ain’t gonna win any track meets but EXPLOSIVE strength is one of the benefits of powerlifting because they train for bar speed. Look at football players especially linemen. They are explosive more than they are “slow”. And if you think they train like bodybuilders and isolate the shit out of their muscles, then your research is fucked up buddy.[/quote]

b.s kid…powerlifters are not explosive on the majority there are ones that are tought powerlifters dont have explosive strength they have just max effort strength i would like to see a powerlifter clean and snatch (almost purely explosive movment) as much as weight lifters do which will never happen you need to read about the diffrent strength types there are b4 you randomly name it EXPLOSIVE.


#19

Explosive Power
Rarely is an athlete required to produce a singular maximal effort in their sport. With the exception of powerlifting, most sports require movements that are much more rapid and demand a higher power output than is generated during maximal lifts (5,6). So while maximal strength training lays an important foundation increasing the potential for additional power development, if there is no conversion of this strength into sport-specific power, the program as a whole is much less effective.

An athlete can be exceptionally strong but lack substantial power due to an inability to contract muscle quickly. Power training is used to improve the rate of force production and a range of methods such as plyometrics can be employed to convert maximal strength into explosive power.

^^^ real meaning


#20

[quote]PB Andy wrote:
God damn you fucking suck xxxwtfxxx.[/quote]

lol i respect the armed forces so im not gonna say anything to you.