T Nation

Form on Deadlift?


#1

I recently just watched a deadlift video, and noticed his form looked quite horrible(to me, at least.) I'm no means a ''form nazi'' but can you guys tell me if this is acceptable?

his pals were saying ''perfect'' but i thought it looked...well, horrible, but still strong.


#2

Aside from the idiotic negatives he looks ok. A bit too much rounding in the lower part of the back but hes strong enough to pull 5 plates. And he pulled it under control.

Most people with bad form get hurt well before pulling 495lbs and doing a 3 second negative with it.


#3

IMO form sucks. Love to see him pull it like an actual deadlift, from the ground. Technique wise he's losing his shoulder position on the way down which is pulling his spine into flexion. Give it enough reps and I'd say he'll hurt himself. Start from the floor and get initial set-up right.


#4

Shitty technique and execution really... I'm with GG on this one.


#5

That was humorous.


#6

That was painful to watch, I would never ever think of starting a set by pulling it off the rack with over 225 lbs.


#7

His first rep was clearly the best.. textbook form


#8

LOL, i thought the same thing. 'what the fuck is this shit?'

also, first time seeing side spots for a deadlift. he must be good


#9

edit: doing this really helps you feel the exercise in your back. it feels like a pure glute/ham exercise when i pull from the floor.


#10

fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuh!


#11

Starting the dead lift at the top position and doing slow negatives seems like it may hold some benefits when it comes to adding some muscle mass to the spinal erectors, but other than that I don't think it's a good idea; especially if you're trying to increase your actual dead lift, which would start off the ground. I suspect that he starts at the top of the lift so that he can utilize the stretch reflex or whatever but might not actually be able to pull that much weight off the ground...

Same thing with people repping weights on the dead lift, i used to be able to rep 365 lbs 6-7 times so long as I never paused the weight at the bottom, but could never break 405 off the ground. Long story short: if you want a bigger dead lift, it might be a good idea to start all of your reps from the ground at a dead stop.

Also, who the fuck needs a spotter for a dead lift? I wonder if they also help spot him with teh dumbellz bichep curls.


#12

holy shhhhhhhhhit. but yeah haha his form looks a thousand times better then the original video i posted. Strong as hell!


#13

long arms, short legs... huh, then all you need is just plates and bum! here we go! great deadlift technic.


#14

Sticking up the Centopani video is an apples and oranges comparison to the original video and the key point initially made re:that technique.

The initial lifter is clearly not strong enough through his thoracic spine to take the weight straight off the rack and maintain good form. Centopani clearly is.

It is much more effective to get your set-up and form right from the floor, which is key for most, if not all lifters who post here.

I don't agree with the touch'n'go technique for safety reasons. When developing lifters see a video like Centopani, haven't developed the strength, they deadlift like that and just hurt themselves. Pulling from the floor, when you click and really feel like, is just this magic connection and feeling of power & explosion through your hips, which probably negates how much you feel your back actually working.

The simple reality is you're not going to pull from the floor without using your back.

Yes, I am trying to correct you, since inclusion of the Centopani video changed the context of this thread and previous comments.


#15

Hey bud I am with you on that..it is some of the worst form I have seen with a RDL. Dude needs to get a copy of Mark Rippentoes classic starting strength the best book I have ever seen on getting the right form.

The guys is showing a squat like set up on the way down and gets himself in a very bad position.

Cheers
Thomo
trainingtruth.blogspot.com