T Nation

For The Love Of The Game

This one has been plaguing me for a few weeks now. One week out from the race of my career. I’m going to keep this one short, let’s get a discussion out of it, and it doesn’t just have to stick to my sport and I hope it doesn’t.

This may be tooting my own horn, but at a point like this I need this attitude. I realize that I’m gifted for my sport, just the technique and even the building comes so natural to me. I’m speaking both of Triathlon and Cycling by itself. When I talk about cycling, I’m far from pro-level but my growth rate just seems promising.

So my question for all of you, how do you really make the decision to go pro in a sport when you know you’re turning down other more “profitable” opportunities. Unless your a team leader or main support, pro cyclists are making 15-20k a year, about the same for a triathlete. You’re taking the punches until you make your break.

Has anyone decided to do this, just for the love of the game, be it bodybuilding, powerlifting, etc?

Well, I dont have any advice, nor am I that good at anything where I’d be able to go pro at. But I do remember your times or speeds posted on this site for different triathlons or TTs or races and I remember them being fast as hell.

Anyway- good luck with whatever you choose.

[quote]TriGWU wrote:
This one has been plaguing me for a few weeks now. One week out from the race of my career. I’m going to keep this one short, let’s get a discussion out of it, and it doesn’t just have to stick to my sport and I hope it doesn’t.

This may be tooting my own horn, but at a point like this I need this attitude. I realize that I’m gifted for my sport, just the technique and even the building comes so natural to me. I’m speaking both of Triathlon and Cycling by itself. When I talk about cycling, I’m far from pro-level but my growth rate just seems promising.

So my question for all of you, how do you really make the decision to go pro in a sport when you know you’re turning down other more “profitable” opportunities. Unless your a team leader or main support, pro cyclists are making 15-20k a year, about the same for a triathlete. You’re taking the punches until you make your break.

Has anyone decided to do this, just for the love of the game, be it bodybuilding, powerlifting, etc? [/quote]

can you support yourself, or have someone that will? i dont be live luxury, i mean food, clothing, shelter, and health insurance. if so, i dont see why you cant take a shot

i think anyone need to do what they are born to.

money, family, sex, a girl, children, career, sport… all is a little mirror where we can see our soul

when you born with a gift you have to complete it… or you’ll die crying your shame

Sortof like cadev said, if you don’t keep at your dream, you’ll be kicking yourself later saying “I wonder what would’ve happened if…”

In my sport, speedskating, I started when I was 16 or 17 when most skaters start when they’re 8 or 10 years old. I’m still pursuing excellence even though I may have a lot longer to go to get there than other skaters. Hell, I moved all the way across the country to train with a team because I love the sport so much.

[quote]chrismcl wrote:
Sortof like cadev said, if you don’t keep at your dream, you’ll be kicking yourself later saying “I wonder what would’ve happened if…”

In my sport, speedskating, I started when I was 16 or 17 when most skaters start when they’re 8 or 10 years old. I’m still pursuing excellence even though I may have a lot longer to go to get there than other skaters. Hell, I moved all the way across the country to train with a team because I love the sport so much.[/quote]

That’s really respectable and definitely something I’d have to consider to get it done. I’m definitely considering moving across the country for the altitude.

[quote]cadav wrote:
i think anyone need to do what they are born to.

money, family, sex, a girl, children, career, sport… all is a little mirror where we can see our soul

when you born with a gift you have to complete it… or you’ll die crying your shame[/quote]

That’s the biggest part that I’m torn about. I’ve thought so hard about the career I want, but this is just as passionate for me.

The difference is any other career but this can wait. I know its better to die trying.

Chris, that’s awesome.
And TRI, finding passion for something in life is the ultimate, I agree.

Being an amateur athlete is expensive, draining, taxing… but I love field hockey and I wouldn’t trade this lifestyle in for any other.

I’m moving overseas for 6 months next year (after I graduate) to train full-time with a men’s team. As long as I am learning in sport, I am learning in life.

I definitely will. And so will you (and you).

[quote]chrismcl wrote:
Sortof like cadev said, if you don’t keep at your dream, you’ll be kicking yourself later saying “I wonder what would’ve happened if…”

In my sport, speedskating, I started when I was 16 or 17 when most skaters start when they’re 8 or 10 years old. I’m still pursuing excellence even though I may have a lot longer to go to get there than other skaters. Hell, I moved all the way across the country to train with a team because I love the sport so much.[/quote]

[quote]proxy wrote:
Chris, that’s awesome.
And TRI, finding passion for something in life is the ultimate, I agree.

Being an amateur athlete is expensive, draining, taxing… but I love field hockey and I wouldn’t trade this lifestyle in for any other.

I’m moving overseas for 6 months next year (after I graduate) to train full-time with a men’s team. As long as I am learning in sport, I am learning in life.

TRI, I think that if you want to dedicate yourself to training/playing pro, you absolutely should. It’s worth it to make it happen before you feel obligations to anyone else.

It really depends on what “going all the way” means to you…

Some of the most impressive athletes I know have never competed in any sport, but just love being active. I have lots of respect for that!

chrismcl wrote:
Sortof like cadev said, if you don’t keep at your dream, you’ll be kicking yourself later saying “I wonder what would’ve happened if…”

In my sport, speedskating, I started when I was 16 or 17 when most skaters start when they’re 8 or 10 years old. I’m still pursuing excellence even though I may have a lot longer to go to get there than other skaters. Hell, I moved all the way across the country to train with a team because I love the sport so much.

[/quote]

[quote]TriGWU wrote:

That’s the biggest part that I’m torn about. I’ve thought so hard about the career I want, but this is just as passionate for me.

The difference is any other career but this can wait. I know its better to die trying. [/quote]

i am with you man.

be yourself or die trying.

as the old song say " i can get no satysfaction but i try!"

life as a predator or be eaten.

[quote]TriGWU wrote:
chrismcl wrote:
Sortof like cadev said, if you don’t keep at your dream, you’ll be kicking yourself later saying “I wonder what would’ve happened if…”

In my sport, speedskating, I started when I was 16 or 17 when most skaters start when they’re 8 or 10 years old. I’m still pursuing excellence even though I may have a lot longer to go to get there than other skaters. Hell, I moved all the way across the country to train with a team because I love the sport so much.

That’s really respectable and definitely something I’d have to consider to get it done. I’m definitely considering moving across the country for the altitude. [/quote]

Hey Tri- no regrets, there are people who would just kill for a shot , if u have that shot take it. Put everything you have into it. Don’t worry about the money. Things have a way of working themselves out. I would hate to look back in 10 years and say what if…

[quote]TriGWU wrote:

That’s the biggest part that I’m torn about. I’ve thought so hard about the career I want, but this is just as passionate for me.

The difference is any other career but this can wait. I know its better to die trying. [/quote]

Thats another part of the “what could’ve happened if…” scenario. My thinking was, “if I don’t put myself in a situation with a great team and (arguably) the best coach in the country and/or world, how will I know if I’ve reached my fullest potential?”

That would be similar to you training at altitude. If all of your competition is doing it, who knows where you could go if you start training at altitude as well.

[quote]TriGWU wrote:
This one has been plaguing me for a few weeks now. One week out from the race of my career. I’m going to keep this one short, let’s get a discussion out of it, and it doesn’t just have to stick to my sport and I hope it doesn’t.

This may be tooting my own horn, but at a point like this I need this attitude. I realize that I’m gifted for my sport, just the technique and even the building comes so natural to me. I’m speaking both of Triathlon and Cycling by itself. When I talk about cycling, I’m far from pro-level but my growth rate just seems promising.

So my question for all of you, how do you really make the decision to go pro in a sport when you know you’re turning down other more “profitable” opportunities. Unless your a team leader or main support, pro cyclists are making 15-20k a year, about the same for a triathlete. You’re taking the punches until you make your break.

Has anyone decided to do this, just for the love of the game, be it bodybuilding, powerlifting, etc? [/quote]

Do it or your a fucking pussy. The profitable opportunies can still be attained if it fucks up. I would give my right nut to be pro in the sport of my choice (porn).
Good luck.

Go for it. And if you decide to move to the Denver/Boulder area to train at higher altitude, you’re welcome to train in my basement gym all you want, so you’ll at least have free gym. It’s no super gym but it’s got a bench, squat rack, kettlebells, and lots of plates.

Carpe diem.

Tri, I have to say take the shot as well… or at least keep moving to the next level until you find out your limits.

However, that does not mean you get to throw away the education or otherwise not take steps to look after your future after your sports career finally does end due to “old age”.

We all get old some time. Hell, as long as you aren’t burning bridges and closing doors, the best time to take a chance is when you are younger and don’t have the responsibilities associated with a wife and family to support.

If you try it and find out you can’t live off it it or whatever, you can change your mind and start pursuing a career based on the academic path you’ve been following. No employer will have a hard time understanding your background, though you might not like starting at the bottom rung further on down the road than many of your coworker peers.

If you don’t try it, you may forever ask yourself “what if”.

Tri - how old are you?

I went pro (BMX) at 23, raced for three years, made similar $20K money and quit when I burned out. I lived like dirt but those were the best years of my life. Took a straight job at 26 and now five years later, have a house, savings and all the other middle class trappings. Paid employment will be there when you get done. Go for it now.

Tri - You are young, talented and passionate…you have to go for it. You’ll never know the outcome if you don’t. Best of Luck!

It’s great to have the perspective of people who have the same passion for competition as me. Most people look at it as chasing a “hobby”.

At 21 I still have 9 years before most go for the “peak”. The problem is some of the kids are only 17. It’s crazy.

It just seems like a waste to not go for it I have to agree with all you guys.

[quote]Deinabolic wrote:
Tri - how old are you?

I went pro (BMX) at 23, raced for three years, made similar $20K money and quit when I burned out. I lived like dirt but those were the best years of my life. Took a straight job at 26 and now five years later, have a house, savings and all the other middle class trappings. Paid employment will be there when you get done. Go for it now.[/quote]

Sounds like the way to go. Respectable too, b/c its obviously for the love of it. There’s always time for the career.

Yeah, shit - 21? No question. Get off the computer and go fill out that pro license app.