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Football Training For 13 Year Old

I’m setting up a workout for my oldest son(he’s 13) to get him prepared for high school football next year. He needs to put on some weight and muscle. He plays a defensive lineman and sometimes offensive lineman.

I have worked on so far a leg routine(including usu. leg extenison and curls plus deadlifts and a squat), he’ll do chest and back days and cling and jerk & kettlebell swings, along with his shoulder day. I am thinking of adding some easier plyos(lat hops, box hops) I am not having him go to heavy since he’s young, but he’s very strong and big for his age(5’ 11"-yikes!!).

Can you think of any other things to add??

Get back to basics. He just needs to learn correct technique and build a foundation. Focus on the big three and pound in good form until you can wake him up with a bucket of cold water at 3 a.m. on a saturday morning and make him squat with perfect form.

Starting Strength would be perfect for him.

is that you in your avatar? major MILF!!! woot!!

i would suggest steering away from pressure to gain weight. i have a group of friends who wanted so bad to gain weight for football in middle and especially high school. when they ended up going to college and not playing ball there they were stuck at a disadvantage with all that extra non-LBM.

other than that i think what you’re doing is awesome. i wish my parents had told me about weights when i was 13

Playing rugby in high school, I decided to stay away from leg curls. Whether it was coincidental, whenever I would re-introduce leg curls into my routine I would pull my hamstrings. After the third time it happened, I stopped doing them.

Billy Whizz said some good stuff…and i agree with him…i train younger people alot, and i always tell them to build a solid foundation and just to work on their form, forget about how much weight is on the bar, it means absolutely nothing if your not doing the lift with proper form…

generally speaking, beginners should stay in rep ranges between 8-15, if they are struggling with 8 reps i think its too heavy for a beginner, but thats my opinion…at once a beginner finds his/her groove strength and size will come naturally and quickly if the lifts are done with proper technigue…so stick with big compound movements, like squats, deadlifts, bench, bent over rows, pull ups, and stuff like that…

i noticed that learning the front squat is much easier than a back squat and more beneficial for athletes in my opinion…anyway, good luck, hope this helped out a little…

IronWarrior

[quote]IronWarrior34 wrote:
Billy Whizz said some good stuff…and i agree with him…i train younger people alot, and i always tell them to build a solid foundation and just to work on their form, forget about how much weight is on the bar, it means absolutely nothing if your not doing the lift with proper form…

generally speaking, beginners should stay in rep ranges between 8-15, if they are struggling with 8 reps i think its too heavy for a beginner, but thats my opinion…at once a beginner finds his/her groove strength and size will come naturally and quickly if the lifts are done with proper technigue…so stick with big compound movements, like squats, deadlifts, bench, bent over rows, pull ups, and stuff like that…

i noticed that learning the front squat is much easier than a back squat and more beneficial for athletes in my opinion…anyway, good luck, hope this helped out a little…

IronWarrior[/quote]

Lot of good stuff in this post too.

But one thing to add. Not everyone will love weightlifting from day one. It is definitely a good idea to throw in some bicep curls if for nothing else than for the satisfaction of having bigger arms. 3-5 sets of biceps curls per week for a 13 year old can do nothing but help.

[quote]Hoppy1015 wrote:
I’m setting up a workout for my oldest son(he’s 13) to get him prepared for high school football next year. He needs to put on some weight and muscle. He plays a defensive lineman and sometimes offensive lineman.

I have worked on so far a leg routine(including usu. leg extenison and curls plus deadlifts and a squat), he’ll do chest and back days and cling and jerk & kettlebell swings, along with his shoulder day. I am thinking of adding some easier plyos(lat hops, box hops) I am not having him go to heavy since he’s young, but he’s very strong and big for his age(5’ 11"-yikes!!).

Can you think of any other things to add??
[/quote]

Work basic lifts, pull-ups, presses, rows, deadlifts, squats. I would try not go below 8-10 reps as his form will fall apart and put him at risk.

I have trained in sprinting and other sports and have had a couple of hamstring injuries along the way. STAY AWAY FROM LEG CURLS AND EXTENSIONS. They might be alright for a bodybuilder, but is un-needed stress for an athlete.

Hamstring exercises for an athlete:

Back squats- pushing back at the hips before bending the knees.

Deadlift variations

Dumbell / Kettlebell swings

Good mornings

Lunges

If he works his legs hard he will put on a lot of bodyweight there, make sure he’s getting conditioning done with his team or on off his own back.

Good luck!

Great advice in here so far. All I’d really add is to make sure he’s doing the movements with proper form, and keeps it that way. Growth spurts can wreak havoc on good form and may mean weight coming off the bar until the mobility comes back.

Love the suggestion to throw bicep curls in there to keep it interesting/fun. I think the same would go for pulling a sled, flipping a tire, etc.

Oh yeah, and don’t forget to feed him lots and keep him off the crap “food” that is fattening up most of the kids around him.

[quote]OooahhhCANTONA wrote:

[quote]Hoppy1015 wrote:

I have trained in sprinting and other sports and have had a couple of hamstring injuries along the way. STAY AWAY FROM LEG CURLS AND EXTENSIONS. They might be alright for a bodybuilder, but is un-needed stress for an athlete.

[/quote]

This is a completely baseless statement. I can say that I have done ham curls and leg extensions my whole life and have never had a hamstring or quad injury. I still play sports on a routine basis and at a higher level than just “pick up” games of anything. You simply can not say that leg curls and hamstring curls are the sole reason for your injuries.

I know a few guys (soccer players) who have blown out their hamstrings and now tweak and reinjure them often. Neither did any sort of hamstring work with weights. By any chance do you walk up stairs on your toes? Or does your whole foot hit the step and do you push through your heel? Injuries like strains and pulls come from mobility issues and strength imbalances. Hamstring curls and leg extensions shouldn’t negatively affect either of those if done right.

Your recomendations for exercises are good but to say people should avoid ham curls because YOU have a problem with your hamstrings is silly. Adding glute-ham raises to your list would also be wise if youre into “functional” training of the posterior chain.

And your recommendation about doing higher rep ranges to PRESERVE form is completely wrong. If anything, the more reps that are done the more fatigue will result. THAT will cause form to break down. Deadlifting 6 sets of triples is much better for a beginner than 2 sets of 9 reps.

When seeing physio’s, strength coaches etc. They have all said that knee flexion hamstring exercises, e.g hamstring curls, should be avoided especially in-season when the hamstrings are performing so much running.

This statement was also recently backed up by Joe DeFranco in his Q and A, and I think this guy knows what he’s talking about. It would also mean much more if an athlete RDL goes up than another athlete who is focusing on their hamstring leg curl numbers going up.

And with the form, I think the weight used is the main issue of the form. But yes 6x3 could be better than 2x9, depending on how tough it is for the beginner.

Wendler posted this interview on youtube the other day. Joe Kenn has a 13 y/o as well he’s prepping for football.


His site: http://www.bighousepower.com/