T Nation

Foot Pain from Running- Ideas?

I’ve never really been a runner, but I used to run occasionally to get fit for rugby. I never had any injury problems from it. But the last month or so I have been running more often, as my wife signed us up for a half marathon, which is in 6 weeks. I’m mainly doing it for her- I could give a toss about running for fun and if I want to lose bf I will just diet.

Anyway I have developed pain in my arches when I run. It comes on after about ten minutes of running and after that I have to stop every few minutes and either walk or stop completely. After a minute or so the pain dissipates and I can run again. I probably should go to the doctor but that is a last resort as I would have to pay. I have good running shoes, about 2-3 months old, am 38 years old, 6ft 1, 230 pounds, 12-15%bf.

Since I have signed up for the half marathon I definitely want to complete it. But I can’t imagine two hours of agony in the race plus all the training. However if I give up I think I may lose my wife to the realm of the fatties.

Is the pain sharp, or is it a cramp, or is it a bruised feeling?

[quote]deanosumo wrote:
I’ve never really been a runner, but I used to run occasionally to get fit for rugby. I never had any injury problems from it. But the last month or so I have been running more often, as my wife signed us up for a half marathon, which is in 6 weeks. I’m mainly doing it for her- I could give a toss about running for fun and if I want to lose bf I will just diet.

Anyway I have developed pain in my arches when I run. It comes on after about ten minutes of running and after that I have to stop every few minutes and either walk or stop completely. After a minute or so the pain dissipates and I can run again. I probably should go to the doctor but that is a last resort as I would have to pay. I have good running shoes, about 2-3 months old, am 38 years old, 6ft 1, 230 pounds, 12-15%bf.

Since I have signed up for the half marathon I definitely want to complete it. But I can’t imagine two hours of agony in the race plus all the training. However if I give up I think I may lose my wife to the realm of the fatties.[/quote]

Did you get the good running shoes from a running store or from a sporting goods store? Because if you’re going to run distances at 38 you should probably be fitted for your shoes by someone trained to analyze your gait. My non-foot-expert guess is that you overpronate and need shoes that can offer more stability.

http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-240-319-327-7727-0,00.html

It’s all about the shoes with distance running. Not just good shoes, but the right shoes. Unfortunately they’re expensive, but I can promise you that if your wife falls off you’ll spend far more over the years in Slimfast and Weightwatchers and crazy half-tried bottles of this and that than the $130 you’ll drop on even the most expensive pair of Asics.

Good luck to you both. I admire you having your wife’s back this way. My husband will occasionally train up for a few weeks to run races with me, though he’s not a runner. I really love that about him.

Stop running.

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
Stop running.[/quote]

Don’t be a spoilsport. He’s already said he’s only doing it a little bit. Do you want his wife lost to the realm of the fatties?

Plantar fascitis maybe?

Good shoes are a must.

Also from what you have explained I do not know if this will help but,

I had a problem with a muscle pull in the bottom of my foot and I put some white tape from the ball of my foot to the heal. I then wrapped tape around both ends to keep it in place.

It takes the place of the tendon

Seems simple but it allowed me to run again.

Roll the bottom of your foot with a tennis/lax ball every day and before you run for at least a couple minutes to break up the fascia, it does wonders.

[quote]EG wrote:
Roll the bottom of your foot with a tennis/lax ball every day and before you run for at least a couple minutes to break up the fascia, it does wonders.[/quote]

Add using foamroller…OR tennis balls on your lower/outer calves to that. I’ve found that ankle mobility affects your arches also.

Thanks for the input guys. I will go get my running form analysed and some shoes custom fit at the Athletes Foot or Shoe Science, one of those expensive-but-good running stores. If it still hurts after that, f*ck it, I’ll go back to lifting heavy things. Cheers

Good advice from everyone.

The only thing I’d like to add is that there are VERY few running shoes designed for folks above 200 lbs. Make sure you discuss this during your fitting.

I was thinking as I ran this morning that they may be able to give you inserts to add a little support to your arches. That would be an inexpensive solution.

HoratioSandoval is right, though, 230lbs is, as my husband likes to say, “a lot of beef on the hoof.” (Running is tough on him at ~210.)

Another thing to think about is that running shoes are good for 300-500 miles. After that they start to go flat. At your weight you’re probably looking at the lower end of that.

Your foot pain is most likely due to weakness within the small muscles of the foot. I used to have this problem, and discovered that while the rest of my body was strong, the small connective tissues of the foot can be weak. You have all sorts of muscles, tendons, and ligaments that work together. Stretching and also jogging barefoot on grass will help.

More great ideas and feedback- I am grateful.

I would try the “Pose” method of running. I known alot of people on here don’t like it but it’s helped me alot with knee pain during runs. Basiclly you land on your midfoot or balls of your feet instead of landing on your heels. The website is Posetech.com

[quote]jawara wrote:
I would try the “Pose” method of running. I known alot of people on here don’t like it but it’s helped me alot with knee pain during runs. Basiclly you land on your midfoot or balls of your feet instead of landing on your heels. The website is Posetech.com[/quote]

People don’t like it because it’s a terrible idea. Your ankle joint is designed to land heel-toe. Doing otherwise for a prolonged period is inviting long-term injury. If this helps when you run, you have some muscular tightnesses and weaknesses that need to be worked out, or your normal form just isn’t very good.

To the OP - go with the Brooks Beast shoes. You’ll be glad you did. I’m a little lighter at 215 and wear their Addiction. It’s like night and day compared to a mid-level New Balance I was wearing (forget the number).

Not that I run much, but on the bi-monthly occasion when it happens, I’m glad I have them.

-Dan