T Nation

Food Intolerance Test


#1

Is it worth the money?

Via a basic blood test this company is offering a food intolerance test.

$250 for the foods listed in baby blue or $325 for all the foods on the list.

Have any of you gotten them done?


#2

If I could afford it I would probably do it.

If you do get it done, I’d be interested to hear the results and whether or not implementing the changes they suggest has any noticeable benefits.


#3

Is that a typo or is there really a nut called a rapeseed?


#4

[quote]WhiteFlash wrote:
Is that a typo or is there really a nut called a rapeseed?[/quote]

rapeseed is what they make canola oil out of. It is a kind of mustard seed. It has Erucic acid which causes arterial scarring even in trace ammounts so I wouldn’t be concerned with the tolerance level.


#5

[quote]WhiteFlash wrote:
Is that a typo or is there really a nut called a rapeseed?[/quote]

It was renamed canola oil ( Canada and oil pushed together) because rapeseed oil or rape oil would be a marketing nightmare


#6

In Canada soybean oil and canola oil are basically in all processed crap put foods


#7

I was dealing with what I believed to be food intolerance issues, and have done quite a bit of research on these tests. The results are questionable and usually error on the side of false positives. The best way to test for food intolerances is a plain old food elimination diet. I tried the Whole 30 diet and found I need to stay away from wheat.


#8

[quote]ta406 wrote:
I was dealing with what I believed to be food intolerance issues, and have done quite a bit of research on these tests. The results are questionable and usually error on the side of false positives. The best way to test for food intolerances is a plain old food elimination diet. I tried the Whole 30 diet and found I need to stay away from wheat.[/quote]

Looks like it’s covered by insurance so no loss.


#9

Thanks for the answers, y’all. Didn’t know that.

Raj, how many of those foods do you actually eat? Seems like it’d be simpler to just start removing foods one at a time and go from there.


#10

[quote]WhiteFlash wrote:
Thanks for the answers, y’all. Didn’t know that.

Raj, how many of those foods do you actually eat? Seems like it’d be simpler to just start removing foods one at a time and go from there. [/quote]

Probably 15% of the list in baby blue?

You’re right it’s easier to play with your diet and see what fits you best, but I wonder if the foods I eat almost on a daily basis are irritating me and perhaps I need to take a break from them?

I think also think some people get symptoms but aren’t able to tie it back to their food choices due to the type of symptom.

I mean if you got a headache two hours after you ate a meal, would you tie it back to what you ate? What if you felt pain, swelling, or stiffness? These can be brought on by food intolerances.

I have no idea the merit of this test, as one guy said it creates a lot of false positives allegedly. That being said, it’s covered by my insurance so I’m going to give it a go.


#11

[quote]therajraj wrote:

[quote]WhiteFlash wrote:
Thanks for the answers, y’all. Didn’t know that.

Raj, how many of those foods do you actually eat? Seems like it’d be simpler to just start removing foods one at a time and go from there. [/quote]

Probably 15% of the list in baby blue?

You’re right it’s easier to play with your diet and see what fits you best, but I wonder if the foods I eat almost on a daily basis are irritating me and perhaps I need to take a break from them?

I think also think some people get symptoms but aren’t able to tie it back to their food choices due to the type of symptom.

I mean if you got a headache two hours after you ate a meal, would you tie it back to what you ate? What if you felt pain, swelling, or stiffness? These can be brought on by food intolerances.

I have no idea the merit of this test, as one guy said it creates a lot of false positives allegedly. That being said, it’s covered by my insurance so I’m going to give it a go.[/quote]

Man, a few years back I was having a handful of problems ranging from lethargy and constant bloating to headaches and gnarly stomach problems. Through a slow elimination process I found dairy and wheat to be the main culprits, especially wheat. Removing those two (and eating 3 meals and maybe a snack instead of every three hours) literally changed my life. I can now do small amounts of dairy, but wheat is (and probably always will be) completely off limits.

Good luck with the test, bud.


#12

To breakdown the list, several items unsurprisingly I consume almost daily on this list.

Brazil Nuts and almonds - I have a big bag of cashews, brazil nuts and almonds which I snack on throughout the course of the week.

Egg whites - I eat whole eggs and egg whites for breakfast probably 3-4x week.

Milk (cow) - I don’t consume milk, but I do drink whey shakes post work and consume cheese via burritos 1-2x week.

Gliadin, yeast and wheat - from googling gliadin, this is a protein that’s a component of gluten so I guess I’m officially gluten intolerant

Mackerel - My fish oil supplement contains mackeral (it’s a blend), I will be switching to one that’s 100% salmon. Also It’s not unusual for me to consume 4 salmon filets/daily so I’m a little surprised salmon didn’t make the list

Rice - now THIS will be the hardest to cut from my list. Rice has pretty much always been my go to carb and now it’s elevated. I guess I’m going Irish and now it will be potatoes, potatoes and more potatoes!

Anyways I will be slowly transitioning my diet to get rid of some of these and see if I notice changes.


#13

What’s your plan moving forward with regard to what your diet will look like, knowing what you now know?


#14

[quote]Davinci.v2 wrote:
What’s your plan moving forward with regard to what your diet will look like, knowing what you now know?[/quote]

  1. Swap out whey for unflavoured pea protein. It taste fucking awful so if you have really sensitive taste buds, I recommend against doing this. It seems to suit my system well though.

  2. Instead of eating 2-3 rice meals per day switch to russet and sweet potatoes. Limit rice meals to when I’m on the go and have to buy something.

  3. Eliminate all eggs and egg products for 3 months. I use to eat egg in cycles - 6 months on 3 months off. I got lazy and stopped doing that.

  4. Eliminate all dairy and limit wheat to 1 tortilla/week. “Butter” my potatoes with Extra virgin olive oil

  5. Switch from a mixed fish oil product to a 100% salmon oil product in order to avoid mackerel and herring.

  6. remove grocery store products that use soybean oil in their ingredients. I would regularly top my chicken with an antipasto spread that used vegetable oil as its base. From my understanding vegetable oil is usually soybean oil.

  7. eliminate almonds and brazil nuts and instead snack on chia seeds, cashews and natural PB.

  8. Avoid steroid cycling for the next 6 months and stick to a TRT dose. See if I get leaner by just changing my food choices while maintaining calories. Monitor my energy levels.

  9. Get tested again in January when my insurance resets. See how results have changed.

I’m open to suggestions…


#15

One more thing I’m doing:

drink 1 tablespoon of raw with mother apple cider vinegar in the morning and again in the evening.

Raw apple cider vinegar has been purported to help with gut health/digestion.


#16

Seems like a solid and comprehensive plan. Have you made the above changes yet? If so, how do you feel?


#17

[quote]Davinci.v2 wrote:
Seems like a solid and comprehensive plan. Have you made the above changes yet? If so, how do you feel?[/quote]

Too early to tell, I’ll update in 6 weeks.

Thanks for the interest, I wasn’t going to bother continuing this thread due to a lack of interest.


#18

Update:

Since making the aforementioned dietary changes ~5 weeks ago I have dropped 7lbs. I went down a notch on my belt and my digestion has shown a marked improvement. Also my libido has increased though that’s probably due to the warm weather and babes walking around in dresses ;).

I highly recommend getting this test done, especially if you’ve been living a weight lifter lifestyle where you’ve been consuming the same foods daily for years.

I knew eggs, soy, dairy and tree nuts were high allergy/sensitivity foods but I would NEVER have guessed rice was a problem for me. Now that I’ve swapped out all my carbs from rice for potatoes and corn I feel like carbs go right through me. If I stick to potatoes and corn as my carb sources, I can eat carbs all day without gaining fat (something I’ve never experienced).

I want to also point out I’ve added in pro-digestion foods.

I drink the following concoction every morning:

1-2 tbsp Raw Apple Cider Vinegar
1 tbsp minced ginger
1 tbsp ground cinnamon
1/2 a fresh squeezed lemon OR the pre squeezed bottled stuff.


#19

I also implemented fermented foods - kimchi into my diet daily for the healthy bacteria.

My local Korean grocer sells fresh kimchi in the refrigerated section. I left it out for 3-4 days, let it ferment and turn sour before consuming.


#20

Interesting stuff raj. I’ve been contemplating doing an elimination diet or food allergy test myself for some time now due to digestive issues.

I got a couple questions for you. Is the food tolerance test you took a standard common test that most gastro drs. will do or did you have a special type or specific one done?

Also I noticed on your results that rice was very low numerically compared to other foods at top of list. Does that mean any food on the list is off limits even with low numbers?