T Nation

Foam Rolling?

Hello everyone,

About 6 months ago I had a lifting accident which left me with a bulging disk. I’m (very) slowly beginning to lift again but the right side of my lower back is very tense. I have the same feeling in the right side of my buttocks and right leg. Is that normal?

I frequently go to a chiropractor who ‘loosens’ things up, but after a couple of days it’s the same old story again. I stretch every day but it doesn’t seem to help …

Could foam rolling be an option to consider? Is that advisable with my condition? And is that possible for the lower back? I asked my chiro and almost everyone in my gym, but nobody knows what a foam roller is … (I’m from Europe, maybe it’s not common here?)

A very big thanks in advance and every reply will be very appreciated:)

  • K

I don’t like the idea of rolling directly on the lower back, but you could probably get some symptomatic relief by rolling on the hip flexors, ITB/TFL, quads, hamstrings, and thoracic spine.

www.EricCressey.com

Its possible for you to use it for your lower back. Any muscle that you can get pressure on a roller can be “rolled.”

If you have Nalgene bottle, I’d suggest using that until you can get a foam roller. The Nalgene bottle works - but the roller is definitely better because they’re bigger, and they have a little more give to them which is actually good.

Matter of fact, I think I’m gonna roll my back out right now, it feels pretty tight.

[quote]Eric Cressey wrote:
I don’t like the idea of rolling directly on the lower back, but you could probably get some symptomatic relief by rolling on the hip flexors, ITB/TFL, quads, hamstrings, and thoracic spine.

www.EricCressey.com[/quote]

Eric,

What do think about using ‘The Stick’ to get som relief?

Thanks

I’ll agree with Eric on this one. I have never had any of my clients roll directly on their lower back. However, more often than not, they will get some relief once they loosen their hips, ITB, TFL, etc up.

Remember: when it comes to the majority of musculoskeletal injuries (lower back, knees, etc), that is where it ended up…not where it originated. More often than not, the body is compensating for some form of kinetic dysfunction.

Spend some time to loosen up the areas AROUND the lower back and I bet you’ll feel better.

On a side note: your chiro didn’t know what a foam roller was? Or did I read that wrong?

[quote]Marmadogg wrote:
Eric Cressey wrote:
I don’t like the idea of rolling directly on the lower back, but you could probably get some symptomatic relief by rolling on the hip flexors, ITB/TFL, quads, hamstrings, and thoracic spine.

www.EricCressey.com

Eric,

What do think about using ‘The Stick’ to get som relief?

Thanks[/quote]

I think it’s great, but I’m still not sold on the idea of doing anything beyond manual therapy (i.e. massage, ART) on the lower back.

www.EricCressey.com

Thanks for the advice. I’ll order one of those rollers on the internet.

And yep, you read it correctly, my chiro didn’t know what a foam roller is. Nor did a fysical therapist I asked …

How did you hurt yourself?

While deadlifting. I wonder if I will be able to squat / deadlift heavy again …

Are there many people with similar conditions who are able to return to heavy training?

[quote]Korvus wrote:
Nor did a fysical therapist I asked … [/quote]

That looks odd. Oh well.