T Nation

Flex Magazine Article: Evolution of HIT

THE EVOLUTION OF HIT
How high-intensity training evolved and how it revolutionized bodybuilding over the past four decades.

This is a good article showing the different variations of HIT over the years, and who made each version popular. Pretty good read. Anybody else see it yet?

Yea - I have that issue.

It’s an interesting read, but it’s mostly just a rehash of what we already know.

Mentzer, Arthur Jones, Nautilus, Darden, the 80 Olympia controversy…etc…etc…

yup. read it, interesting how the evolution happened walking you through the Mentzer era through Yates and stating that Henry made his biggest gains through DC. Despite the brevity it was a good read.

It was cool to see DC recognized.

[quote]cyruseven75 wrote:
yup. read it, interesting how the evolution happened walking you through the Mentzer era through Yates and stating that Henry made his biggest gains through DC. Despite the brevity it was a good read. [/quote]

I don’t get what yates or DC have to do with HIT…
They aren’t even low-volume or anything.
And I don’t get what’s so special about HIT. Arnold and most before him also did one set to failure… They just counted their warm-ups… Same as most big guys do today.

Jones’ early stuff was the most useful of the actual HIT imo… And still doesn’t hold a candle to modern methods.

Yeah, good article. I always get the mag a month late (my brother has a free subscription, so I get it when he’s done -lol), but occassionally there’s something worth reading. I always loved Mentzer’s and yates’ physiques, so even just seeing pics of them after a while is a nice little reminder of what I want to look like.

I don’t think Henry gets enough credit because of his height, but if you realize that he came up as a middleweight, and now is coming in at about 200 solid lbs, at his height,… that’s a helluva lot of dense muscle, and without starting to look unasthetic in the least.

I will admit to thinking Ellington Darden is out of his mind, and I have read several of his books (while sitting in barnes n Nobles), but he always seems to take things too far, and unlike Mentzer, you never really hear of him working with any ‘real’ bodybuilders. Also, when he tosses in one of the two older pics of himself that he always finds a reason to,… it’s really not all that inspiring in my opinion.

S

[quote]The Mighty Stu wrote:
Yeah, good article. I always get the mag a month late (my brother has a free subscription, so I get it when he’s done -lol), but occassionally there’s something worth reading. I always loved Mentzer’s and yates’ physiques, so even just seeing pics of them after a while is a nice little reminder of what I want to look like.

I don’t think Henry gets enough credit because of his height, but if you realize that he came up as a middleweight, and now is coming in at about 200 solid lbs, at his height,… that’s a helluva lot of dense muscle, and without starting to look unasthetic in the least.

I will admit to thinking Ellington Darden is out of his mind, and I have read several of his books (while sitting in barnes n Nobles), but he always seems to take things too far, and unlike Mentzer, you never really hear of him working with any ‘real’ bodybuilders. Also, when he tosses in one of the two older pics of himself that he always finds a reason to,… it’s really not all that inspiring in my opinion.

S
[/quote]

I’m with you on the Yates, Mentzer and Henrys physiques, they have that dense, powerful look, or herculean as i’ve heard it’s called. Mentzer’s physique is still my inspiration. In Darden’s defense though, he is always first to say that you should stick with what works with you whether it’s volume, HIT, etc. Mentzer never really worked with any real bodybuilders either, just Yates but I have read that it was only a couple of times and he mainly worked with average people. Darden’s target group is just the average joe looking to get in better shape as well. I don’t think Darden’s physique was that bad, but nothing on Mentzers.