T Nation

Flavored Yogurt - Too Much Sugar?

Strawberry yogurt is my favorite but alas, there is a ton of sugar in it. for one cup of strawberry yougurt, the least sugary one i could find has 39 carbs, 0 dietary fiber and 32 sugars.

are these sugars fructose and lactose(from the yogurt)? Or glucose, lactose and fructose?

it seems like a lot of sugar. can i use this as meal without being worried about the yogurt going to fat?

Try one of the low carb yogurts by Hood. The strawberry’s and cream is excellent.

Try getting plain yogurt and adding a packet of Splenda to it.

-Machine

The sugars in fruit-added yogurt and/or low-fat yogurt is both lactose and fructose. The standard for any dairy product is about 12 grams of natural lactose sugar per 8 oz, so they add another 15-20 grams if shitty fructose on top of that!!! Fructose is of course the worst sweetener health wise. People think the low-fat is healthier, but removing the fat makes this crap even higher glycemic than before. If it wasn’t for the calcium in yogurt it would be equivalent to a bag of Lays Potato chips! On second thought, without the fat and subsequent vitamin D to help the calcium get absorbed, sweetened yogurt is merely a junk food.

Moving on, I agree that you should buy plain yogurt (no sugar added) and add your own fruit. I’d get used to it without adding a lot of artificial sweeteners too. I’m not going to jump on the bash the non-nutritive sweeteners band wagon, but the less the healthier as a rule.

TopSirloin

its nice how people repeat garbage as fact…

[quote]cycomiko wrote:
its nice how people repeat garbage as fact…[/quote]

meaning?

[quote]Joe Weider wrote:
cycomiko wrote:
its nice how people repeat garbage as fact…

meaning?[/quote]

Calcium uptake is increased by 1,25 Dihydrovitamin D, and sugars (such as lactose)

Not vitamin D perse, or by fat.

[quote]AllBizNiz wrote:
Try one of the low carb yogurts by Hood. The strawberry’s and cream is excellent.[/quote]

I love the (Hood) “Carb Countdown” yogurts. Walmart has had them for $.54 for months but now all of a sudden they no longer CARRY THEM!!! I can’t find them anywhere.

The Peach flavor is Gross, by the way.

I haven’t ever seen the Vanilla flavor to try.

Isn’t going to make me give up my yogurt, flavored or not. I’m not exactly a purist, been there done that, life’s too short. Pick your battles. Have your yogurt during a time of day when carbs are okay, not all carbs are bad ducking and running*** Definitely look into adding your own fruit especially when it’s in season, takes a bit of getting used to, but worth it.

[quote]fedorov91 wrote:
AllBizNiz wrote:
Try one of the low carb yogurts by Hood. The strawberry’s and cream is excellent.

I love the (Hood) “Carb Countdown” yogurts. Walmart has had them for $.54 for months but now all of a sudden they no longer CARRY THEM!!! I can’t find them anywhere.

The Peach flavor is Gross, by the way.

I haven’t ever seen the Vanilla flavor to try.[/quote]

The vanilla one is my favorite. Its awesome in protein shakes. Im sure they have it at Publix or any other national chain.

You can also try adding a half (or whole) scoop of vanilla Grow! to plain yogurt. It ups the protein by 10-20g, tastes sweet, and if you add your own fruit it’s pretty darn healthy.

[quote]cycomiko wrote:
Joe Weider wrote:
cycomiko wrote:
its nice how people repeat garbage as fact…

meaning?

Calcium uptake is increased by 1,25 Dihydrovitamin D, and sugars (such as lactose)

Not vitamin D perse, or by fat.[/quote]

I appologize for the “slightly” inaccurate post, I appreciate the redirection. But, what’s the difference between dihydrovitamin D and vitamin D and which one is in dairy? In any event, vitamin D being a fat soluable vitamin would be lessened when the fat is removed from dairy, no? So, in essence I think it can be concluded that vitamin D absorbtion might be reduced when consuming low-fat dairy, aside from it making it higher glycemic. I just didn’t know that vitamin D absorbtion was aided by a sugar such as lactose. I don’t think I was that far off.

Thanks,

TopSirloin

You don’t have to give up your yogurt, but as you may have heard, fructose is a crappy carb, even when your body may need to re-fill muscle glycogen as fructose usually doesn’t end up in the muscle cell.

I wanted to edit my last couple comments: dairy products tend not to be high glycemic, rather they tend to call for an insulin spike which would likely be increased when consuming low-fat dairy products such as low-fat yogurt and skim milk. I suppose that it might be a decent PWO-only food afterall. So you were correct, 911 girl! :wink: Sorry to confuse you or anyone else.

TS

yoplait lite has 19 grams of carbs, 14g sugar 5g of protein. Not perfect. . . but better than the regular stuff.

Plain yogurt and chocolate protein is great. If you use the whole fat kind it isn’t tart and you won’t ned to add any sweetner. I also spoon this into popsicle molds for dessert.

I buy the generic kind from Wal-Mart (Great Value). The nonfat kind has 13g of carbs, 7g of sugar.

[quote]TopSirloin wrote:
But, what’s the difference between dihydrovitamin D and vitamin D and which one is in dairy? [/quote]
1,25 Dihydrovitamin D is a Hormone, a final metabolite of Vitamin D (under control, so intake of vitamin D does not always lead to increased levels of 1,25(OH)2 VitD.
vitamin D in dairy is the food souce of something that can be generated invivo (part of cholesterol metablolism into Vitamin D in skin)

[quote]In any event, vitamin D being a fat soluable vitamin would be lessened when the fat is removed from dairy, no?[/quote]Sorta, it gets complicated… the term fat soluble is a tad awkward. as they are essentially lipids, they do not need additional lipids per se to be taken up. If they are within the product, without additional fat, they can be taken up within the gut. Seeing how they are lipids, it is difficult within the average diet to get enough without eating adequate fat, not that the fat increases their uptake. If there is 0.1% fat in a dairy product, and they fortify it with Vitamin D, it will still be absorbed. I have a better description of it somewhere, I think at work.