T Nation

FLAMEOUT vs. Rx Omega 3s


#1

I just returned from the doctors where they did some blood work. Everything was solid except that my HDL was 35ish and my white blood cell count was a little low. I have been sick lately, but the doctor recommended that I get prescription omega 3's. They said it would cost about 70 dollars for 60 days worth.
With the information about, will FLAMEOUT be a good choice instead?


#2

Yes. When it comes back. In the meantime you will get exactly the same benefits from high dose fish oil and a few CLA pills. Very cheap too if you get the Costco brand as a member. Can be annoying thogh as you have to take some 3x the fishoil pills of Flameout to get the same amount of EPAs and DHAs. But just as good.


#3

I didn't even know there was such a thing as "presription" omega-3's. The price for any prescription will depend on your insurance. Most health insurance plans have prescription coverage that would make the cost to you about $10 or $20 per prescription. If you don't have insurance then sure, you'd pay full-price, but . . . prescription omega-3's?? Pardon the pun, but that sounds completely fishy to me. You can get all the omega-3's you need, and in as perfect a form as you'll find anywhere, over the counter (in stores, on the Internet, etc.). I'm calling bullshit. The doc must have some kind of kickback scheme, or be selling the product himself out of his own office.


#4

Yeah, I think it's for either or the low white blood cell count and the the HDL. I was told I could buy over the counter also. I thought it was pretty cool that M.D.'s are recommending these now.


#5

I'd agree but I think this is more scary than cool.

This is just going to give pharmaceutical companies another reason to lobby against supplement companies.

Watch... a few years and O-3s will require an Rx.


#6

Kaz,

It is interesting that your MD offered to perscribe you Omacor (the perscription fish oil) because it is approved by the FDA for the treatment of high triglycerides. Flameout seems to be an extremely purified product right up there with Dr. Sears' OmegaRx fish oil. If I remember correctly the EPA/DHA per serving between Omacor is similar to that of Flameout.

In regards to raising your HDL I would say exercise is your best bet. As men we are doomed to lower HDL levels (compared to women) but exercise can compensate for the difference and get your level where they need to be.

Personally I would skip the Omacor and go with Flameout. I know some people are still recommending the Kirkland brand but the toxins in fish oil are so nasty why take the risk of a lower quality product. I know that Consumer Reports gave them a favorable review but that was several years ago and you will need to take a much higher dosage than 1 serving of the Kirkland brand.


#7

Not to get in a pissing contest but Flameout and Omacor do have about the same EPA/DHA per serving.

1 serving of Flameout (4caps) has 3.02g of EPA/DHA and 1 serving of Omacor (4caps) has 3.6 grams of EPA/DHA.


#8

Why does a prescription version of omega-3's (Omacor) even exist? What's the point, seeing that you can buy essentially the same stuff OTC? Seems silly to me, not to mention worrisome that the pharmaceutical companies MIGHT eventually try to get fish oil supplements somehow banned from the OTC market now. Let's see if we all of a sudden see a spate of news reports saying "Fish oil supplements potentially dangerous if used incorrectly!!" Then we'll know it's begun. :frowning:

Incidentally, high doses of fish oil caps (something on the order of 4,000-5,000 mg of combined EPA + DHA per day) have caused my HDL to shoot up to astronomical levels (from somewhere in the 40's to 99!). And that was, or course, with OTC fish oil caps.


#9

Well, it's because Flameout is the first product to come close to prescription-strength doses. I don't pharmaceutical companies will ever be successful in mandating that you get a prescription for fish oil even if they tried. After all, we have prescription allergy medications but still plenty of OTC ones that are supposedly weaker.