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Fixing a Mysterious Shoulder Injury?

The Baby Car Seat jacked my right shoulder.

I’ve been nursing a mysterious shoulder condition where if I pronate my humerus (think showing of your bicep with your forearm across your upper abdomen) and try to raise my arm I only get about 45 degrees and I can’t go any higher.

I’m weak on that side for benching but I’m okay with push presses and push ups. I’ve gone REALLY light on my lateral raises and have pushed them to the end of my workout.

This happened months ago and sometimes it when I wake up it kills me because my “natural” sleep position is on my back with my arms above my head. It doesn’t hurt to start out that way, but gets unbearable when I wake up during the night.

Here’s what I think I did after months of not knowing what the heck “caused” the injury: We have an extended cab four door pick up and I would have to heft the car seat to the middle of the back seat.

My right arm was usually the one that was placed at the bottom of the car seat and carried most of the weight to get it up where it needed to be.

I don’t remember when it happened I just know this is the result. Any ideas?

Talking to your physician helps.

Thanks for the suggestion, but I’ve already talked to one of the docs I work with and he suggests it to be bicipital tendonosis, but is oblivious for recuperation. The only the he suggested was some pre and post rotator cuff stretches with a broomstick…

hence the question.

Try using the rubber band physical therapy. Progressivly increase the tension. You’ll get the strength back quickly.

Sounds similar to what I had a while back. I tore the Bicep/Pec insert. If you do biceps, does your chest hurt?

The physical therapist recommended the above excersise.

If your techniques are wrong in your excersies it doesn’t help either.

[quote]ChuckDHunt wrote:
The Baby Car Seat jacked my right shoulder.

I’ve been nursing a mysterious shoulder condition where if I pronate my humerus (think showing of your bicep with your forearm across your upper abdomen) and try to raise my arm I only get about 45 degrees and I can’t go any higher.

I’m weak on that side for benching but I’m okay with push presses and push ups. I’ve gone REALLY light on my lateral raises and have pushed them to the end of my workout.

This happened months ago and sometimes it when I wake up it kills me because my “natural” sleep position is on my back with my arms above my head. It doesn’t hurt to start out that way, but gets unbearable when I wake up during the night.

Here’s what I think I did after months of not knowing what the heck “caused” the injury: We have an extended cab four door pick up and I would have to heft the car seat to the middle of the back seat.

My right arm was usually the one that was placed at the bottom of the car seat and carried most of the weight to get it up where it needed to be.

I don’t remember when it happened I just know this is the result. Any ideas?[/quote]

Chuck, although I am not an M.D., it sounds (from personal experience) as if you have a full-thickness rotator cuff tear, likely of the supraspinatus tendon. You need to have an MRI done on that shoulder, which will likely show the location and extent of any tears. So, seriously, go to an ortho, and when he/she sends you to get an MRI and diagnoses, let me know if my guess was correct.

[quote]ChuckDHunt wrote:
Thanks for the suggestion, but I’ve already talked to one of the docs I work with and he suggests it to be bicipital tendonosis, but is oblivious for recuperation. The only the he suggested was some pre and post rotator cuff stretches with a broomstick…

hence the question.[/quote]

The rotator cuff stretches with the boomstick deal is a miracle worker, but is excruciating when you start. Both my shoulders are messed up with the right one being worse. Mine was bad when I did like Roman salute pulling my arm across my chest or shoulders. between MSM, glucosamine and the stretches my shoulders, especially the right are at least 60% better in the last several weeks.

Thanks for all the input. When I get checked I’ll post up the results…

don’t even dick around with ortho guys, go straight to a shoulder specialist. ortho guys misdiagnose a lot of shoulder injuries. although an MRI tells you some information, arthrogram/CT (w/ dye) scans can tell you a great deal more. I am telling you, go to a shoulder specialist from experience.

Whoever you consult with, make sure they specialize in shoulder injuries.

A Master’s degree in the subject is a must. I won’t see anyone with anything less anymore. I wasted 12 sessions at $60 each at a PT with his “bachelor of physical therapy” and my shoulder was none the better.

Three sessions with a PT with her MSc in shoulder injuries and I was back in my kayak, training hard and racing again.

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I have a full-thickness supraspinatus tear, and none of those symptoms are present (just pain with overhead pressing movements and bench press). It is not fully detached, but it is a full-thickness tear.

[quote]patricio2626 wrote:
I have a full-thickness supraspinatus tear, and none of those symptoms are present (just pain with overhead pressing movements and bench press). It is not fully detached, but it is a full-thickness tear.[/quote]

If you have not already had surgery and are maybe looking into another alternative treatment, check out platelet (PRP) injections. Just a suggestion.

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Hi BBB,

‘Full-thickness’ simply means that part of the muscle is torn all of the way through. Picture, if you will, the center section of the supraspinatus frayed and detached, but the edges still intact at the attachments. This is common, due to the acromion putting pressure on and fraying the middle of the supraspinatus. Excuse the elementary diagram:

Shoulder
| | | |
| | | | <— The center is torn, but outside muscle bands still holding on.
| | | |
| | | |
Humerus

Here’s a web page that shows a full-thickness tear without full detachment (second photo):

[quote]bushidobadboy wrote:
patricio2626 wrote:
I have a full-thickness supraspinatus tear, and none of those symptoms are present (just pain with overhead pressing movements and bench press). It is not fully detached, but it is a full-thickness tear.

Doesn’t ‘full thickness’ mean all the way through? I think you’ll find that it does (or should, lol).

So how can you have a functioning muscle when the tear is all the way through? If yours is not detached then how can it be ‘full thickness’?

BBB[/quote]

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