Fish During Pregnancy Is Smart

Eating fish during pregnancy raises IQ in children

By Ben Wasserman - foodconsumer.org
Feb 16, 2007 - 11:17:44 AM

Children born to mothers who ate at least three servings of fish a week during pregnancy had significantly higher scores in tests of mental function in their early years, according to a new British-American study published in the Feb. 17 issue of the journal The Lancet.

The conclusion conflicts with the United States government’s fish advisory on fish consumption for pregnant women.

“For the baby’s development, at the level of 12 ounces a week during pregnancy, the beneficial effects of the nutrients in fish far outweigh the risk,” healthyday.com quoted Dr. Joseph Hibbeln, a clinical investigator at the U.S. National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and lead author of the study report.

The Food and Drug Administration and the Environmental Protection Administration and the Food and Drug Administration issued an advisory in 2004, which is still current, telling pregnant women to avoid eating more than 340 grams of fish – about 12 ounces a week – because of the danger of mercury poisoning.

According to the current finding, however, maternal seafood intake during pregnancy of less than 340 grams a week was associated with drastically increased risk of children being in the bottom 25 percent of verbal IQ at the age of 8 years and with suboptimum performance on tests of social behavior, fine motor activity, communication and social development.

Hibbeln was cited by as saying the FDA and the EPA have been briefed on the results of the study.

In response, Suzanne Ackerman, a spokeswoman for the EPA, was quoted as saying, “We looked at all the relevant information before issuing the guidelines. It is much too early to say whether one study will change the guidelines.”

Similarly Veronica Castro, an FDA spokeswoman expressed the FDA’s view on the finding saying, “We have made no changes to our current information regarding pregnant women and seafood consumption,” quoted by healthyda.com.

In the study, researchers followed the children of 11,875 women living in Bristol, England, who had expected due delivery dates between April 1991 and December 1992. The mothers were surveyed for their diet four times during pregnancy and the children were assessed periodically for their social and developmental skills.

“We noted that children of mothers who ate small amounts (less than 340 grams per week) of seafood were more likely to have suboptimum neurodevelopmental outcomes than children of mothers who ate more seafood than the recommended amounts,” the researchers write in their study report.

Not surprisingly, the apparent benefits “most likely” came from the high content of omega-3 fatty acids in fish, Hibbeln said. As for mercury, the fish consumed in England “appears to have more methyl mercury in it than the fish eaten in the United States, particularly tuna,” he was quoted as saying.

“Our study has shown that the benefits of eating fish do outweigh the risks,” Jean Golding, professor emeritus of pediatric epidemiology at the University of Bristol and a co-investigator for the study was quoted by healthday.com as saying.

“That might be at least three portions a week. Not at every meal, but we couldn’t see with the information we had any harm from eating fish.”

This statement is in disagreement with some previous study that showed that eating too much may offset the benefits from fatty fish oil or fish omega-3 fatty acids. Because of that, some researchers suggested that fish consumption should be limited according to the FDA/EPA fish consumption advisory.

http://foodconsumer.org/7777/8888/C_hildren_amp_W_omen_33/021611172007_Fish_During_Pregnancy_Helps_Child_s_Development.shtml

[quote]Miserere wrote:
Not surprisingly, the apparent benefits “most likely” came from the high content of omega-3 fatty acids in fish, Hibbeln said. As for mercury, the fish consumed in England “appears to have more methyl mercury in it than the fish eaten in the United States, particularly tuna,” he was quoted as saying.

“Our study has shown that the benefits of eating fish do outweigh the risks,” Jean Golding, professor emeritus of pediatric epidemiology at the University of Bristol and a co-investigator for the study was quoted by healthday.com as saying.
[/quote]

Why don’t they talk about considering pure EPA/DHA supplements without mercury (Flameout anyone) while perhaps still consuming some relatively risk free quantity of seafood… ?

[quote]vroom wrote:
Why don’t they talk about considering pure EPA/DHA supplements without mercury (Flameout anyone) while perhaps still consuming some relatively risk free quantity of seafood… ?[/quote]

I wonder if they even know fish oil caps exist…

That’s it.

When I have kids my wife will be popping 20g fish oil daily.

On the big day I want her DHA saturation so high the delivery room smells of fresh seafood.

– ElbowStrike

[quote]ElbowStrike wrote:
That’s it.

When I have kids my wife will be popping 20g fish oil daily.

On the big day I want her DHA saturation so high the delivery room smells of fresh seafood.

– ElbowStrike[/quote]

That’s hilarious and gross at the same time.

But be careful she doesn’t give birth to a mermaid :slight_smile:

[quote]vroom wrote:
Why don’t they talk about considering pure EPA/DHA supplements without mercury (Flameout anyone) while perhaps still consuming some relatively risk free quantity of seafood… ?[/quote]

Not only did this report fail to mention fish oil supplements, they completely ignored the role of iodine in brain development and function.

Hello, retards!!

http://www.who.int/features/qa/17/en/index.html

[quote]ElbowStrike wrote:
That’s it.

When I have kids my wife will be popping 20g fish oil daily.

On the big day I want her DHA saturation so high the delivery room smells of fresh seafood.

– ElbowStrike[/quote]

It does anyway.

Isn’t there a caution or warning on the Flamout bottle advising pregnant women against taking it?

I’m not at home so I can’t check my bottles but remember reading that warning on some fish oil caps… Seemed odd to me.

What’s up with that??